Tuesday of the 30th Week of the Year

Luke 13:18-21

The Parable of the Mustard Seed and of the Yeast

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES from Fr. Francisco Lucas MATEO Seco 

2019 Liturgical day: Tuesday 30th in Ordinary Time

«What is the kingdom of God like?»

+ Fr. Francisco Lucas MATEO Seco

(Pamplona, Navarra, Spain)

Today, the liturgical texts, through these two parables, place before our eyes one of the characteristics of the Kingdom of God: it is something that flourishes slowly —as a mustard seed— but, eventually, grows to offer shelter to the birds in its trees. Tertulian said it like this: «We come from yesterday and we fill everything». With this parable, Our Lord encourages us to patience, fortitude and hope. These virtues are especially necessary for those who devote themselves to propagate the Kingdom of God. We must be patient, and with God’s grace and human cooperation, wait for the planted seed to grow while profoundly embedding its roots in the good soil to gradually become a tree. In the first place, we need to have faith in the virtuality —fecundity— contained in the seed of the Kingdom of God. This seed is the Word; it is also the Eucharist that is planted in us through Communion. Our Lord Jesus Christ compared himself to «a kernel of wheat that falls to the ground and dies (…). But if it dies, it produces many seeds» (Jn 12:24).

The Kingdom of God, our Lord goes on, is similar to «the yeast a woman has taken and hidden in three measures of flour until it is all leavened» (Lk 13:21). Here also the yeast capacity to leaven all the dough is mentioned. This is what happens with “the rest of Israel” which the Old Testament mentions: the rest will have to save and leaven all the people. Continuing on with the parable, we only need the yeast inside the dough, getting to the people, to be like salt that preserves from corruption and makes all food to taste (cf. Mt 5:13). Time is also of essence so that it can carry out with its function by and by.

Parables encouraging patience and the hopeful certainty; parables referring to the Kingdom of God and to the Church, and that are also applied to the growth of this same Kingdom in each of us.

evangeli.net/gospel/day/IV_272

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Tuesday of the 30th Week of the Year

Luke 13:18-21

The Parable of the Mustard Seed and of the Yeast

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES from Carmelites.ie

2019 Tuesday 29 (2019.10):         Of the Thirtieth Week in Ordinary Time

Romans 8:18-25; Psalm 125; Luke 13:18-21

In the letter to the Romans St Paul acknowledges that we do suffer in this life but he goes on to say that those sufferings are nothing compared to the glory which is to be revealed at our resurrection. That glory is in the next life and we must be patient for it will not be revealed to us in this life, though it is there for each one of us. The Psalm supports Paul’s teaching – “Those who are sowing in tears will sing when they reap.” In the Gospel passage for today, we see Jesus talking about the kingdom of God and his message is that it is something which has the power to transform society. It may start with humble beginnings but it has the power to be a great transforming and growing force which can bring peace, beauty and shelter to our modern and often way-ward world. However, it can only grow if each member of the Church plays their role in the building up of the kingdom, otherwise the kingdom will remain very small. Retrieved 2019.10.29 from Carmelites.ie

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Tuesday of the 30th Week of the Year

Luke 13:18-21

The Parable of the Mustard Seed and of the Yeast

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES from Fr. Martin Hogan

2019 29th October >> Fr. Martin’s Gospel Reflections / Homilies on Luke 13:18-21 for Tuesday, Thirtieth Week in Ordinary Time: ‘What is the kingdom of God like?’

Tuesday, Thirtieth Week in Ordinary Time

Gospel (Europe, Africa, New Zealand, Australia & Canada)

Luke 13:18-21

The kingdom of God is like the yeast that leavened three measures of flour

Jesus said, ‘What is the kingdom of God like? What shall I compare it with? It is like a mustard seed which a man took and threw into his garden: it grew and became a tree, and the birds of the air sheltered in its branches.’

Another thing he said, ‘What shall I compare the kingdom of God with? It is like the yeast a woman took and mixed in with three measures of flour till it was leavened all through.’

Gospel (USA)

Luke 13:18-21

When it was fully grown, it became a large bush.

Jesus said, “What is the Kingdom of God like? To what can I compare it? It is like a mustard seed that a man took and planted in the garden. When it was fully grown, it became a large bush and the birds of the sky dwelt in its branches.”

Again he said, “To what shall I compare the Kingdom of God? It is like yeast that a woman took and mixed in with three measures of wheat flour until the whole batch of dough was leavened.”

Reflections (5)

(i) Tuesday, Thirtieth Week in Ordinary Time

Both of the parables in today’s gospel reading contrast small beginnings with powerful results. The tiny mustard seed becomes a tree, providing shelter for the birds of the air. The small amount of yeast leavens a large batch of flour, providing bread for humans. There is also a contrast between what is hidden and what is visible. The seed sown in the ground does its work invisibly and only becomes visible when the plant begins to push through the soil. The yeast works invisibly in the flour and its impact only becomes visible when the batch of dough rises. Jesus declares that these sets of contrasts can be compared to the kingdom of God. In what sense? Jesus seems to be saying that the kingdom of God comes to pass through actions that seem very insignificant at the time and may not be visible to others. There is an important message there for the times in which we live as church. In the past, the size and visibility of the community of faith, the church, was evident to all. Today the presence of the church is smaller and almost seems invisible to many. Jesus is reminding us that God can work powerfully through what seems small and invisible. Our calling is to sown the seed, and become the leaven, in accordance with our gifts and energy levels, and to trust that the Lord will work through us in ways that will surprise us.

And/Or

(ii) Tuesday, Thirtieth Week in Ordinary Time

In this morning’s gospel Jesus takes an image from the world of men and the world of women in that culture, a man who takes a mustard seed and throws it in his garden and a woman who takes some yeast and mixes it in with three measures of flour. In each case the small gesture produces significant results. The mustard seed becomes a tree where the birds find shelter; the yeast mixing with the flour produces bread which satisfies human hunger. These are images, Jesus declares, of the kingdom of God. Jesus seems to be saying that the coming of God’s kingdom is not always about grand gestures. The coming of God’s kingdom, the doing of God’s will on earth as in heaven, is often to be found in what to an outside observer seems small and insignificant. Jesus is suggesting that God can work powerfully through the smallest gestures, when they reflect something of God’s Spirit. God is present in our world in and through our small acts of kindness, through our largely unnoticed actions of caring for one another. Jesus would say that even the giving of a cup of cold water has significance beyond our imagining. The eternal can be present in the simplest of gestures. Our daily efforts to be faithful to the gospel in small ways can have consequences that would surprise us. The miraculous is all around us, working through our smallest efforts at goodness, if we have eyes to see.

And/Or

(iii) Tuesday, Thirtieth Week in Ordinary Time

The two parables that Jesus speaks in this morning’s gospel reading, one parable involving a man and the other involving a woman, have a similar focus. In both cases a contrast is drawn between something very small and the very significant impact it goes on to have. A tiny mustard seed produces a tree which becomes a home for the birds of the air. A tiny piece of leaven transforms a significant amount of flour. In each case, Jesus says that the kingdom of God is like that. Jesus seems to be saying that in the realm of God what is very small can turn out to be very significant. Even our smallest acts of kindness can have an impact for good beyond anything we might imagine. Small initiatives taken in the service of the Lord can create an opening for the Lord to work powerfully. We can be tempted to think that unless some event within the church is big and impressive in the eyes of the world it does not count for much. Yet, the parables in today’s gospel suggest that it is the small actions, the tiny initiatives, what goes unnoticed by most people, that can become the bearers of the kingdom of God.

And/Or

(iv) Tuesday, Thirtieth Week in Ordinary Time

In using the image of the mustard seed in the soil and of the leaven in three measures of flour for the kingdom of God, Jesus is suggesting that the kingdom of God, the goodness of God, can often be present in small and insignificant ways in people’s lives. Those looking at soil might never suspect that a mustard seed is hidden there; those looking at three measures of flour might never suspect that leaven is hidden there. Yet, the mustard seed in the soil can transform the garden and the leaven in the flour can transform the dough. We can miss the little signs of God’s presence, of God’s goodness in ourselves and in others. Deep within our nature God has planted the seed of God’s life that can grow in surprising ways; deep within our hearts God has placed the yeast of grace that has the potential to transform us into the image of Jesus. We need to keep reminding ourselves of this good news, especially in times of failure, when we may not be living as the Lord is calling us to live. Even at those times when we look unpromising to ourselves and others, we still carry deep inside us a divine treasure whose power at work within us, as Paul reminds us, can do immeasurably more than all we might imagine.

And/Or

(v) Tuesday, Thirtieth Week in Ordinary Time

In this morning’s gospel reading Jesus speaks two parables, one featuring a man and the other featuring a woman. Both suggest that something very small can produce effects far beyond what might have been expected. The farmer threw a mustard seed into his garden and from it grew a tree whose branches provide shelter for the birds of the air. A woman places a small piece of yeast in a batch of dough and the result is a leavened batch of bread which feeds several people. Jesus is saying that the kingdom of God is like that. God can work powerfully through the smallest of gestures. The little good that we do can have consequences far beyond our imagining. The small initiatives we take in the service of another can bear fruit that we could never have intended. The small step to reach out in love towards someone can launch a movement of love that we never anticipated. In the course of his ministry the Lord did not usher in the kingdom of God in a blaze of glory. Rather in his day to day encounters with ordinary people he sowed seeds of the kingdom and eventually those seeds went on to produce a wonderful harvest. We are all called to sow seeds of the kingdom in the day to day circumstances of our lives; we are called to act out of the values of the kingdom in our daily encounters with others. In so doing we are sowing the seeds of a harvest beyond our imagining.

Fr. Martin Hogan, Saint John the Baptist Parish, Clontarf, Dublin, D03 AO62, Ireland. Retrieved 2019.10.29

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Tuesday of the 30th Week of the Year

Luke 13:18-21

The Parable of the Mustard Seed and of the Yeast

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES from Faith.ND

2018 Reflection – October 30, 2018

Nancy Sullivan

ND Parent

I have never seen a mustard tree, but the imagery Jesus uses to compare its genesis to the Kingdom of God reminds me of the massive oak in my backyard. Over a century ago, some intrepid squirrel buried a seemingly insignificant acorn in the soil there. Through the quietly miraculous action of sun, soil, and water this seed has become a colossal hardwood whose gigantic trunk and soaring branches teem with life.

I’ve always held the most obvious interpretation of the mustard tree metaphor: small actions boldly began and persistently nourished with faith, hope, and love can lead to surprising, miraculous results.

I think of my friend, Sr. Kathleen, who in 1977 began serving peanut butter sandwiches to the homeless from an abandoned storefront on the near west side of Cleveland. Through the work of countless volunteers, including the help of many Notre Dame alumni and Notre Dame students engaged in service-learning projects, the storefront slowly expanded to become the West Side Catholic Center. Today the Center provides shelter, meals, clothing, and advocacy to thousands of our most vulnerable brothers and sisters in Cuyahoga County each year. Surely, this is the Kingdom of God in our midst.

I find Jesus’ teaching in today’s Gospel to be both comforting and challenging: comforting when my efforts seem so puny in the face of so much need, and challenging when I am tempted by cynicism and my own inertia to say, “Why bother?” Jesus instructs us to plant the small seed anyhow, for we do not plant it alone. The creative power of God, the life-giving love of Christ, and the movement of the Holy Spirit in the diligent work of many Christians will quietly and miraculously bring forth the Kingdom of God in ways we can scarcely imagine.

faith.nd.edu/s/1210/faith/social.aspx?sid=1210&gid=609&pgid=43081

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Tuesday of the 30th Week of the Year

Luke 13:18-21

The Parable of the Mustard Seed and of the Yeast

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES from Navchetana

2018 Tuesday of the 30th Week in the Ordinary Time

October 30, 2018

Tuesday of the 30th Week in the Ordinary Time

Eph 5: 21-33; Gospel LK 13:18-21

The Parable of the Mustard Seed & the Parable of the yeast

Jesus loved trees. He meditated with silence of the trees on hilltops (Lk. 6:12). He taught under trees (Jn 1: 48). He told several parables with the metaphor of plants and trees (Mt 13: 31-32, Lk. 13: 18-19).

Jesus experienced the Divine as Father deep within himself as the stem experiences the roots. “I have come forth from the Father” (Jn 16: 28). “The Father who is the source of life has made the son the bearer of life” (Jn 5: 26). The underlying language Jesus used is the language of a tree. The stem would speak of its roots, roots are in me, and we are one. Jesus said, “I am in the Father; the Father is in me” (Jn 10, 30).

The parable of the mustard seed is found in all the three synoptic Gospels. In Matthew and mark the seed grow up into a “shrub”, but in Luke into a “tree”. And Luke specifies that the birds made “nests in its branches”. Nowadays the concept of “Birds of the air” is very strong and popular as it denotes caring the underprivileged wanderers and homeless people. Several organizations are taking care of them by helping their material and spiritual needs.

When we reflect the relationship of the root with the stem and that of the stem with the branches there is a strong inter-relatedness. The same vital sap flows from the roots through the stem into the branches. There is a beautiful co-existence. The entire tree does not live for itself; rather it gives itself away fully: flowers, and fruits, branches and leaves, roots and stem and shelter and shade. The tree reminds that self-giving adds quality to human life. Life evolves in love. Human existence is a co-existence.

A tree is a symbol of social life and responsibility. We need to care the unwanted, unloved and uncared homeless people providing the basic needs such as food shelter and clothes and a decent dignified living. The growth of the kingdom is measured by our generous giving and caring the oppressed and marginalized people.

The Parable of the yeast “To what shall I compare the Kingdom of God”? It is like yeast that a woman took and mixed in with three measures of flour until all of it leavened” (Lk. 13: 21). So of the parables and teachings of Jesus powerfully portrays the feminine aspect of the divine. The woman keeps the flour mixed with the yeast and the whole flour got leavened. Another woman searches a coin and when she finds it she celebrates with her friends. The ever alert and sensible handmaids are waiting for the bridegroom. “Those who thirst let them come and drink from me” (Jn 7: 37) is a powerful thought coming from the depth of the heart of a mother. The “motherly” Jesus wished to keep Jerusalem under his care just like “a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you were not willing!”(Matt: 23: 37).

The whole language and mind-set of Jesus used during the Last Supper is that of motherly love. Washing the feet, serving the table, offering bread and dying for others – all are integral part of motherly/feminine love. During the Supper, John, the Evangelist who opens the mysteries who carries the symbol of an Eagle “was reclining next to Jesus” just like a child who is so close to its mother.  God is at the same time Father and Mother to all those who adore and worship him and he a compassionate Father (Mother) who loves all – “the just and the unjust”. (Ref. Matt. 5: 42-48) Fr. Shepherd Thelappilly CMI

navchetana.com/web/homilies.php?date=2018-10-30

2019 Tuesday of the 30th Week in Ordinary Time

October 29, 2019

Tuesday of the 30th Week in Ordinary Time

Romans 8: 18-25; Psalms 126: 1-2b, 2cd-3, 4-5, 6; Luke 13:18-21

Kingdom asks for Death

Even after praying for 2000 years, the Kingdom of God remains as a distant reality, somewhere up in heaven. It has not come down to the ‘experiential level.’ Jesus used two examples to speak about the Kingdom of God; mustard seed and leaven. These two are very simple and close to the everyday life. But they both have one thing in common, that is death.

In order that the kingdom of God grows in us we must undergo a death process; death to the self, ego, mind, identity and many more.

When the plant comes up, the mustard seed is nowhere. You won’t get it even if you dig for it. When the dough is leavened, you cannot separate the leaven from it. The separate existence of leaven is no more. There is the ‘death’.

Only when the Jesus of Nazareth died there was Jesus Christ. Jesus had foretold his death many times even though the disciples could not grasp it. The teaching on the Kingdom of God, that we read today, was in the context of foretelling of his death (Lk 9:22, 9:44)

When the young Francis ‘died’ to his egoistic self, there came a saint and the people around him experienced the kingdom of God.

Sr. Mary Teresa had to ‘die’ to give birth to Theresa of Kolkata through whom the sick and destitute experienced the Kingdom.

Kingdom of God is very simple and natural like a mustard seed. But it asks for our death – death to my ego, my selfish plans, my comfortable life, my personal interests, my love for power, etc.

If we dare to ‘die,’ the Kingdom of God will grow in us like a huge tree that can shelter birds of the air. Fr. Johnson Bezalel CMI

navchetana.com/web/homilies.php?date=2019-10-29

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Tuesday of the 30th Week of the Year

Luke 13:18-21

The Parable of the Mustard Seed and of the Yeast

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES from Association of Catholic Priests

2018 30 October. Tuesday, Week 30

Married holiness

Deep in our human nature is planted a seed that is meant to grow to complete human fulfilment. There is an inner “yeast” to transform us as in the dough that is baked into fresh bread, the staff of life. Marriage, one of the most basic, elementary of human institutions, mirrors the mystery of Christ’s love for the church.

Christian hope cannot be limited on the prospect of heaven but must also attend to the details of human life. Ephesians suggests that marriage, family and marital love should be inspired by the example the spiritual presence of Jesus. A faithful and fruitful marriage is a powerful image of Jesus’ love for the church. All genuine love, whether within marriage or friendship, produces holiness. What is said of Christ’s love for the church is applied to marriage, in Ephesians: “He gave himself up for her.” The idea that wives should be submissive to their husbands is now outdated and should be seen as just a historical-cultural echo from the past. This same section of Ephesians also speaks of the obligation of slaves to obey their masters (Eph 6:5)…. and no one would quote this today to support slavery, that was taken as normal in those days.

If we want to belong to the reign of God, we need to discern the hidden mustard seed of divine possibility in our lives. In this way we can resemble the woman who so kneads the yeast into the dough that not only does her own life rise to its full potential, but other people’s lives benefit also.

Two parables, one message

The two parables in today’s gospel, one involving a man and the other involving a woman—have a similar focus. Both draw a contrast between something very small and the very significant impact it makes. A tiny mustard seed produces a tree which becomes a home for the birds of the air. A tiny amount of leaven transforms a significant amount of flour. In each case, the kingdom of God is like that.

In the realm of God what is very small can turn out to be very significant. Even our smallest acts of kindness can have an impact for good beyond anything we might imagine. Small initiatives taken in the service of the Lord can create an opening for the Lord to work powerfully. We can be tempted to think that unless some event within the church is big and impressive in the eyes of the world it does not count for much. Yet, the parables suggest that small actions, tiny initiatives, often unnoticed by others, can promote the kingdom of God.

associationofcatholicpriests.ie/2018/10/30-october-tuesday-week-30/

2019 29 October, 2019. Tuesday of Week 30

Fermentation and growth

In many places bread is considered as the staff of life. It was so vital a food that Jesus often used it as an image for life itself. Deep within us is planted a seed that will grow to full flowerin; there is an inner zest to transform and ferment us as yeast does in the dough that is baked into fresh bread.. The whole created world eagerly awaits the revelation of what is already stirring within it, and of ourselves as children of God.

Paul’s letter to the Romans sparkles with a magnificent hope. He believes that that every human being carries the seed of eternal life, that we are called to be children of God. A grace of transformation has come through Jesus Christ for all of humanity. Even the billions of non-Christians in the world also carry within themselves the seed or image or eternal life with God. The goodness and humanity in the pagan world, and among Buddhists, Hindus, Sikhs and Muslims or the strong monotheistic religion of Islam, represent a yearning for what is yet to be revealed.

To live our lives to the full, we must nurture the hidden mustard seed of divine possibility within us. Like the woman who kneads the yeast into the dough that will be baked into life-sustaining bread, we can do our part to contribute freshness, life and dignity, wherever we are.

Two images, one focus

Both parables, about the man (gardening) and the woman (baking), have the same moral teaching. Each contrasts very small beginnings with the great effect they can have. The mustard seed grows large encough to shelter nesting birds. A tiny pinch of leaven ferments a basin full of flour. Jesus says that the kingdom of God works like that. In the eyes of God what starts very small can bring a rich result.

Even small acts of kindness can have an impact for good our expectations. Small initiatives in the service of the Lord can be very helpful for others. We need not think that unless some church event is big and impressive it counts for little. the two images in today’s gospel suggest that even small actions and initiatives, unnoticed by most people, can help promote the kingdom of God.

Fermentation and growth

In many places bread is considered as the staff of life. It was so vital a food that Jesus often used it as an image for life itself. Deep within us is planted a seed that will grow to full flowerin; there is an inner zest to transform and ferment us as yeast does in the dough that is baked into fresh bread.. The whole created world eagerly awaits the revelation of what is already stirring within it, and of ourselves as children of God.

Paul’s letter to the Romans sparkles with a magnificent hope. He believes that that every human being carries the seed of eternal life, that we are called to be children of God. A grace of transformation has come through Jesus Christ for all of humanity. Even the billions of non-Christians in the world also carry within themselves the seed or image or eternal life with God. The goodness and humanity in the pagan world, and among Buddhists, Hindus, Sikhs and Muslims or the strong monotheistic religion of Islam, represent a yearning for what is yet to be revealed.

To live our lives to the full, we must nurture the hidden mustard seed of divine possibility within us. Like the woman who kneads the yeast into the dough that will be baked into life-sustaining bread, we can do our part to contribute freshness, life and dignity, wherever we are.

Two images, one focus

Both parables, about the man (gardening) and the woman (baking), have the same moral teaching. Each contrasts very small beginnings with the great effect they can have. The mustard seed grows large encough to shelter nesting birds. A tiny pinch of leaven ferments a basin full of flour. Jesus says that the kingdom of God works like that. In the eyes of God what starts very small can bring a rich result.

Even small acts of kindness can have an impact for good our expectations. Small initiatives in the service of the Lord can be very helpful for others. We need not think that unless some church event is big and impressive it counts for little. the two images in today’s gospel suggest that even small actions and initiatives, unnoticed by most people, can help promote the kingdom of God.

associationofcatholicpriests.ie/2019/10/29-october-2019-tuesday-of-week-30/

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Tuesday of the 30th Week of the Year

Luke 13:18-21

The Parable of the Mustard Seed and of the Yeast

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES from Living Space

Tuesday of week 30 of Ordinary Time – Gospel

Commentary on Luke 13:18-21

At this point Luke inserts two short parables about the kingdom of God which Jesus is inaugurating. Let us remind ourselves briefly what we mean by the ‘kingdom of God’. The Greek word is basileia which is more accurately translated ‘kingship’ or ‘reign’. So it is a network of relationships rather than a place that we are talking about. The basileia of God occurs wherever people are submitting themselves to that loving power of God in their lives and in their mutual relationships, working together to bring God’s love and justice to the world.

Jesus is the symbol, the very embodiment, of the kingdom as, through him, God’s loving power breaks into people’s lives. And, insofar as they accept him and his message, the kingdom is being realised. In the Lord’s Prayer we ask God that the whole world may, in this sense, come under the reign of God when we say, “Your Kingdom come; your will be done on earth as in heaven.”

So today, Jesus gives two parables or images of the Kingdom. First, he compares it to a mustard seed which a man planted in his garden. The tiny seed eventually grew into a sizeable bush so that the birds were able to make their nests in it. When these words were written the Church, the agent of Jesus’ mission, was still tiny but it had already begun to grow considerably from its beginnings with a handful of Jesus’ disciples. There is an air of hope and confidence that it will continue to grow in spite of the persecutions and setbacks it is facing and will continue to face. How amazed would those Christians be to know that the seed since has grown not into a shrub but into a huge tree! In our own time, we need to keep fresh the hope and confidence of this parable. In so far as we are dedicated to truth and love we have nothing to fear; ultimately they will and must prevail.

The second parable compares the reign of God to a small measure of yeast that a woman kneads into a batch of dough as she makes bread. In time, under the influence of the small amount of yeast, the whole batch will begin to swell and rise. In Scripture, yeast, because it is a fermenting agent, usually symbolises what is evil and corrupt but here the emphasis is on its growth effect. This is an image of how the reign of God spreads through the world. It does so by being totally inserted into that world. Externally it is not seen but its influence is felt everywhere bringing about gradual change. As Christians, we are called to be agents (though not the only agents) of the Kingdom. We can only do this by ourselves being fully inserted in our societies, not by separating ourselves from them. At the same time, we must keep our distinctively Christian vision just as the yeast, though invisible, remains distinct from the dough it is transforming. If this looks like infiltration, it is! But not all infiltration is bad, not if it is driven by God’s truth, goodness and beauty. Such infiltration does not undermine but builds up and transforms.

livingspace.sacredspace.ie/o1303g/

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