Third Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C)

Neh 8:2-4,5-6,8-10; 1Cor 12:12-30 (12:12-14,27); Luke 1:1-4:4-21

The Beginning of the Galilean Ministry

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES from Fr. Tommy Lane

2013 Your Word is a Lamp for my steps and a Light for my path

Homily for the Third Sunday of Year C

by Fr. Tommy Lane

What do you read every day to nourish your mind and feed your mind? What do you refrain from reading because it would not uplift or delight you or would corrupt your mind? What TV programs do you watch because they are helpful and what TV programs do you not watch because they are not uplifting you? We decide how to nourish our minds and feed our minds by choosing what to read and watch, and we decide how to protect our minds by not reading or watching what does not uplift us.

What would feed our minds and uplift our minds most of all? The Bible, because it is the Word of God. That is why in the first reading (Neh 8) Ezra the priest read the Law, which is the Torah or first five books of Old Testament, to the Jews in Jerusalem, and why in the Gospel (Luke 4:14-21) Jesus read from the Scriptures in the synagogue in Nazareth. That is why we read Sacred Scripture every time we assemble here for Mass or some other liturgy. That is why we are encouraged to read our Bibles at home every day. The Bible is the Word of God and is therefore the most nourishing food for our mind each day.

Sometimes we forget how precious the Word of God is but think of this example. In 1964 the Romanian government released religious and political prisoners. One of them, Richard Wurmbrand, had spent nearly three of his fourteen years in prison in solitary confinement. In his book entitled In God’s Underground (pages 106-107) Wurmbrand describes how one day a new prisoner named Avram arrived in the prison. The upper part of his body was in a plaster cast. When the guards left him he drew out a small tattered book from behind the plaster cast. None of the other prisoners had seen a book for years. They asked him what the book was. It was the Gospel of John. Wurmbrand wrote that he took the book in his hand and no life-saving drug could have been more precious to him. From that day the tattered little book went from hand to hand, many learned it by heart and each day they would discuss it among themselves. That reminds us that sometimes we forget the importance of the Word of God in our lives.

In fact the Bible is so important that Vatican II tells us that the Church has always venerated the Scriptures as she venerated the Lord’s Body (Dei Verbum §11), though of course no with the same worship. The Catechism of the Catholic Church (§103) repeats the same point. Do you venerate the presence of Jesus in the Bible? A famous preacher in the third century, Origen, expressed it like this,

“You receive the body of the Lord with special care and reverence lest the smallest crumb of the consecrated gift fall to the floor. You should receive the word of God with equal care and reverence lest the smallest word of it fall to the floor and be lost.”

That reminds us that in every celebration of the Eucharist there is both a Liturgy of the Word and a Liturgy of the Eucharist. The apparition at Knock is a representation of both the Liturgy of the Word and the Liturgy of the Eucharist.

How do we hear the Word of God? We have an opportunity to hear the Word of God each time we come here. Try to go home after each Mass with some idea from the Scripture readings or their explanation in the homily in your mind. Ask yourself, “What is the Lord saying to me?” when you hear these readings from Scripture proclaimed and explained. If we don’t ask ourselves “What is the Lord saying to us?” it is no surprise if we do not hear the Lord. Those of you who proclaim the Word of God in the Scripture readings have a privileged duty. The Church teaches that when Sacred Scripture is proclaimed in the liturgy it is Christ himself who is speaking (Sacrosanctum Concilium §7). So readers, prepare well. Allow Christ to speak through you to all of us. Remember that Jesus is using your voice to talk to all of us. You have a privileged responsibility. Jesus uses your voice to talk to all of us because when you proclaim the Scriptures Jesus talks to us.

We also hear the Word of God by reading the Bible in our own homes. I began by asking questions about what way we nourish our minds. Try to nourish your mind every day by feeding it with Sacred Scripture for at least a few minutes. As part of your family prayer together every evening why not read a short passage from the Gospels and think about it means for you. Open your Bible and light a candle beside it as a sign of the presence of Jesus in the Scriptures. Keep your Bible in a prominent place in your home so that you will see it every day and be reminded to read it.

St. Gregory wrote, “The Bible is a love letter sent by God to his people in which we can perceive the heart of God.” Read and listen to God’s love letter to you every day. St. Jerome said, “Ignorance of the Scriptures is ignorance of Christ.” The Word of God in the Bible brings us healing and helps us cope with life’s problems. We may not find an answer to every problem but it will certainly broaden our vision. So Ezra read the Law, the Torah or first five books of Old Testament, for the Jews in Jerusalem and Jesus read the Scriptures in the synagogue in Nazareth. It is no wonder that Ps 119:105 says,

“Your word is a lamp for my steps
and a light for my path.”

Let us nourish and feed our minds every day on the Bible, God’s love letter to us.

“The Bible is a love letter sent by God to his people in which we can perceive the heart of God.”

“Ignorance of the Scriptures is ignorance of Christ.”

“You receive the body of the Lord with special care and reverence lest the smallest crumb of the consecrated gift fall to the floor. You should receive the word of God with equal care and reverence lest the smallest word of it fall to the floor and be lost.”

Copyright © Fr. Tommy Lane 2013

This homily was delivered when I was engaged in parish ministry in Ireland before joining the faculty of Mount St. Mary’s Seminary, Emmitsburg, Maryland.

Source: frtommylane.com/homilies/year_c/03.htm

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Third Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C)

Neh 8:2-4,5-6,8-10; 1Cor 12:12-30 (12:12-14,27); Luke 1:1-4:4-21

The Beginning of the Galilean Ministry

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES from anawim

2019 Third Sunday in Ordinary Time

Meditations

Today we repeat the heartwarming refrain of the Responsorial Psalm, “Your words, Lord, are Spirt and life.” In today’s liturgy, therefore, the Church invites us to ponder the meaning and importance of the Word of God for our lives. We take time to encounter the Word, the life-giving Word who was in the beginning with God (cf. Jn 1:1). From the Divine Word come words that are truly “Spirit and life” for us. These words include his decrees, his precepts, and his commands, which, as the Psalm tells us, give wisdom to the simple, joy to the heart, and light to the eye.

In today’s reading from the Book of Nehemiah we observe that the people of Israel were deeply moved, even to tears, as they listened to the words of the law of the Lord. Yes, “the precepts of the Lord are right, rejoicing the heart.” Why were the people touched so deeply as they received the words of the Lord? Because they were previously in exile, which meant that for a long time they felt cut off from God and from his words. The Ark of the Covenant was lost, the temple had been desecrated, and the people had ignored or forgotten much of what God had told them. The absence of the Word of God was tantamount to the absence of God in their lives, which led to the loss of their identity and then to complete disorientation. How could they live as God’s Chosen People if they no longer knew who chose them or what he said to them? We recall that their being forced into exile was a result of their unfaithfulness to the word of God.

Now that the people have been brought back from exile and have rebuilt the walls of the city, it is an inexpressible joy for them to hear once again the words of the Lord, to be filled with his “Spirit and life.” It is like coming back to life. They are regaining their identity and finding once more meaning in their lives. It is no surprise that they spend several long hours listening attentively. In response they bow down in reverence, for the words of the Lord are the people’s living connection with the One from whom they come. The leaders remind the people that this day on which they receive the word of God is a holy day, a day for rejoicing in the Lord.

It is the same for us. Today is the Lord’s Day. We rejoice to be able to worship the Lord in the Church and to hear his word. As we listen, we take his word into our hearts, and consequently find our identity and meaning in our lives.

In today’s Gospel, we encounter the life-giving Word of God in a new and greater way: in Jesus Christ, the Word made flesh. Jesus goes into the Nazareth synagogue and reads from the Book of the prophet Isaiah. The passage he selects is a summary prophecy, an inspired “job description” of the awaited Messiah, who will come to bring good news to the poor, to set the captives free, and to give sight to the blind. The words of the prophecy mirror what we learn from today’s Psalm. Just as the words of God – his laws, decrees, precepts and commands – give Spirit and life, so too does the Word made flesh give Spirit and life. The Messiah’s mission is to refresh the soul, give wisdom to the simple (the poor) and enlighten the eye (bring sight to the blind).

Jesus declares that the Scripture passage he has just proclaimed is fulfilled in the hearing of his audience. It is being fulfilled in our own hearing as well, as we ponder the word today. We meet Jesus in his word. Conversely, when we neglect the word, we neglect him. “Ignorance of the Scriptures,” St. Jerome says, “is ignorance of Christ” (cf. CCC 133). When the inspired word is proclaimed, Christ the Messiah is proclaimed. It is he who gives sight to the blind, giving us wisdom and freedom. Jesus the Eternal Word who speaks the good news of joy through the Scriptures is the good news in person; he is not just an abstract concept or an idea, he is the Word made flesh.

Jesus comes to us in a very special way in the Holy Eucharist. Through his Eucharistic presence, which is identical with his presence while he was on earth, he continues to fulfill the prophecy of Isaiah. When we encounter the Eucharistic Lord, the Word made flesh, we are filled with joy and peace; we receive wisdom and the true light of faith, to see clearly through the darkness of this world. He gathers us together and nourishes us with his life-giving word as he feeds us with his Body and Blood. Our life as a Catholic Christian community is and should be centered on the Holy Eucharist.

The Eucharist also expresses our unity as the one Body of Christ. Many though we are, our communion with Christ makes us all one. St. Paul in his First Letter to the Corinthians reminds us that we are all one in Christ. We have been given different gifts as members of the one Body. We all have the responsibility to use whatever gifts we are given to build up the Body of Christ, the Church. “You are Christ’s body, and individually parts of it.” These words of the Lord also give us Spirit and life!

When have I felt as if I were in exile? How can I worship the Lord? Do I center my life on the presence of Jesus in the Eucharist?

Source: anawim2.com/anawimway/meditations/third-sunday-in-ordinary-time-2/

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Third Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C)

Neh 8:2-4,5-6,8-10; 1Cor 12:12-30 (12:12-14,27); Luke 1:1-4:4-21

The Beginning of the Galilean Ministry

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES from 365 Days With The Lord

GOSPEL

The Prologue

1Since many have undertaken to compile a narrative of the events that have been fulfilled among us, 2just as those who were eyewitnesses from the beginning and ministers of the word have handed them down to us, 3I too have decided, after investigating everything accurately anew, to write it down in an orderly sequence for you, most excellent Theophilus, 4so that you may realize the certainty of the teachings you have received.
14Jesus returned to Galilee in the power of the Spirit, and news of him spread throughout the whole region. 15He taught in their synagogues and was praised by all.
16He came to Nazareth, where he had grown up, and went according to his custom into the synagogue on the sabbath day. He stood up to read 17and was handed a scroll of the prophet Isaiah. He unrolled the scroll and found the passage where it was written: 18“The Spirit of the Lord is upon me,/ because he has anointed me to bring glad tidings to the poor./ He has sent me to proclaim liberty to captives/ and recovery of sight to the blind,/ to let the oppressed go free,/ 19and to proclaim a year acceptable to the Lord.” 20Rolling up the scroll, he handed it back to the attendant and sat down, and the eyes of all in the synagogue looked intently at him. 21He said to them, “Today this scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing.”

REFLECTION:

2010: The Year of the Lord’s Favor Is… Today

Jesus was a familiar face in Nazareth where he grew up. He attended the Sabbath services with Mary and Joseph, with his cousins and relatives. The community knew them well. When Joseph died, Jesus carried on his trade as carpenter.
Then, one day, Jesus left Nazareth. It was not altogether unexpected; many young men had forsaken this dull town, from which nothing good seemed to come out, in search of greener pastures. But the news that soon reached Nazareth was beyond expectations. It said that Jesus had achieved renown as a rabbi in the region of Galilee. Some people said he was a prophet; others marveled at his healing power. Whoever thought that a carpenter would turn out to be a religious figure?
Now the famous son returns. Naturally all Nazareth gathers in the synagogue to hear him speak. The hazzan—the synagogue caretaker and master of ceremonies—hands Jesus a scroll of Isaiah. Unrolling the scroll, Jesus quickly finds a passage from the prophet and proclaims: “The Spirit of the Lord is upon me… He has anointed me… to bring glad tidings to the poor… to announce a year of favor from the Lord.”
The people are amazed at the way Jesus proclaims the prophecy. They can feel his authority. They fix their eyes on him as they wait for what more he has to say. The words then come like a trumpet blast: “Today this Scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing.”
After the Christmas season, which reveals to us the mystery of the child Jesus, the liturgy opens the public ministry of Jesus with these ringing words: “Today this Scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing.” For those of us who heard the infancy stories of Matthew and Luke proclaimed during Advent and Christmas, the person of Jesus seems a mystery no longer: he is the fulfillment of the messianic expectations, the Word made man, the Son of God. Now comes the obvious question: What will this Child be when he grows up?
“Today this Scripture passage is fulfilled.” The life and ministry of Jesus is the proclamation of the good news that God loves his people and cares for them, especially the poor, the sick, and the downtrodden. Jesus proclaims a “year of favor from the Lord,” God’s holy year when all forms of slavery and oppression cease.
“In your hearing…” The prophecies of Isaiah were fulfilled then and there in the synagogue of Nazareth because Jesus was present. In the same manner, they are realized today when the words of Jesus are proclaimed in our own hearing.
We sometimes wonder why even if we celebrate Christmas yearly, each time we get caught up in its mystery and enchantment. The peace and good will of the season fill us in a special way. If we pause and think about it, the spirit of Christmas is with us the whole year round.
This is because Jesus is “Emmanuel”—God-with-us today. He continues to be reborn in our hearts.
God’s salvation is being fulfilled “in our hearing.” Jesus, through the Holy Spirit, is always at work to bring “glad tidings” to those who open their hearts to receive the good news.

2013 He has sent me to proclaim liberty to captives. The Lord Jesus presents himself in his inaugural speech, declaring his program as a liberator. And that is how he appears in the gospel of Luke: Jesus liberates people from their sicknesses, from religious ignorance, from fear, from sin, and even from death. He knows that you and I are in need of liberation, and he has come to set us free by the power of the Spirit of God.

Do we allow Jesus to free us from the things that enslave or limit us? If we submit to Christ, we shall experience the freedom of the children of God, as did Mary Magdalene, Paul, Augustine, Francis of Assisi, Charles de Foucauld, and many other saints and blesseds. It is true, though, that like St. Augustine, we put off allowing Christ to free us. We say to Christ, “Yes, Lord… but not yet!”

Once we have experienced the freedom that God gives, we should then, like Jesus, also help set others free. The test of the genuineness of our conversion to Christ and our experience of freedom is our eagerness to help others experience what we have experienced.

“It is unthinkable that a person should believe the word and submit himself to the kingdom without becoming a person who bears witness to it and proclaims it in his turn” (Paul VI, Evangelii Nuntiandi).

Source: graceandspace.org/welcome/home/365-days-with-the-lord/1608-the-beginning-of-the-galilean-ministry-.html

2019 Today this scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing

January 27, 2019 | Filed under: Opinion,Reflections Today | Posted by: Tempo Desk

IN writing his gospel, the evan­gelist Luke states his intention to establish a link between the Old Covenant/Testament and the New, with Jesus Christ as the main connection. He writes to a certain Theophilus, who may be construed as the patron who pays for the manuscripts ac­cording to the custom of his time (no print­ing press existed), or to “Theophilus,” who in Greek means “lover of God” and may represent every Christian. The writers of the New Tes­tament recognize the authority of the Jewish Sacred Scriptures, often referring to the “Law of Moses,” to David, to the prophets, and to the Holy Spirit. Luke here quotes the prophet Isaiah: “The Spirit of the Lord God is upon me, because the Lord has anointed me; he has sent me to bring good news to the afflicted, to bind up the brokenhearted, to proclaim liberty to the captives, release to the prisoners, to announce a year of favor from the Lord” (61:1-2).

Jesus is the fulfillment of the Law, the His­tory, and the Prophets. Jesus restores the or­der of creation broken by the disobedience of the first man Adam; he fulfills the covenant given to Abraham and Moses; he establishes the eternal Kingdom promised to the house of David; he is the anointed and Spirit-filled prophet in the mold of Isaiah and Elijah and Elisha; he is the Messiah who will liberate the whole humanity from sin, sickness, and death. His entrance signifies the Lord’s year of mercy, recalling the jubilee year wherein debts are forgiven and freedom is given to slaves and captives – a new era of total liberation for all humanity.

SOURCE: “365 Days with the Lord,” ST PAULS, 7708 St. Paul Rd., SAV, Makati City (Phils.); Tel.: 895-9701; Fax 895-7328; E-mail: publishing@stpauls.ph; Website: stpauls.ph.

Source: tempo.com.ph/2019/01/27/today-this-scripture-passage-is-fulfilled-in-your-hearing/

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Third Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C)

Neh 8:2-4,5-6,8-10; 1Cor 12:12-30 (12:12-14,27); Luke 1:1-4:4-21

The Beginning of the Galilean Ministry

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES from Bishop Abet Uy, DD

2016 Saturday, January 23, 2016

3RD SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME (YEAR C)

Lukas 4:16-21

Ang pagbasa, pagpaminaw ug pagpasabot sa Pulong sa Dios nahimong dakong kabahin  sa kinabuhi sa katawhan sa Israel. Pananglitan, gisaysayan kita diha sa unang pagbasa  kon giunsa pagdala sa usa ka pari nga gingalag Esdras ang Libro sa Balaod ni Moises ngadto sa katawhan nga nagkapundok, apil ang mga kabataan. Diha sa iyang pagpaambit ug pagpasabot sa Pulong sa Dios, gidasig ni Esdras ang katawhan nga magpabiling masaligon haloyo sa mga kalisod ug pagsulay nga ilang nasinati. Pinaagi sa makanunayong pagpaminaw sa Pulong sa Ginoo, ang katawhan sa Israel nailhan isip katawhan sa Dios ug nahatagag makahuloganong kinabuhi.

Ang pag-adto ni Hesus sa sinagoga matag Adlawng Igpapahulay nagpakita sa iyang pagkamatinud-anon sa tradisyon sa iyang katawhan. Ang ebanghelyo nagsaysay nga usa niana ka higayon si Hesus mibarog sa sinagoga, mikuha sa basahon, ug mibasa sa usa ka bahin sa sulat ni Isaias nga nag-ingon: “Ang Espiritu sa Ginoo ania kanako. Gidihogan ko niya aron pagdala sa maayong balita ngadto sa mga kabos, pagsangyaw og kagawasan sa mga binilanggo, paghatag og bag-ong kahayag sa mga buta ug kagawasan sa mga dinaogdaog, ug sa pagpahibalo sa tuig sa kalooy sa Ginoo.” Adunay batid sa Bibliya nga misugyot nga kining bahina sa Kasulatan maoy paborito ni Hesus tungod kay kini naghatag og katin-awan sa iyang pagkatawo ug misyon isip anak sa Dios.

Si propeta Isaias nagsangyaw mahitungod sa usa ka kahimtang nga maoy gusto sa Dios para sa iyang katawhan – usa ka kalibutan nga pagaharian sa kaangayan, kagawasan, gugma ug kalinaw. Sa pag-ingon ni Hesus, “Karong adlawa ang maong panagna natuman samtang namati mo kanako”, iyang gipasabot nga ang kabubut-on sa Dios natuman diha kaniya. Siya ang pinili nga gipasabot ni Isaias nga maoy magdala’g maayong balita ngadto sa mga kabos, kagawasan sa mga binilanggo, kahayag sa mga buta, ug kaluwasan sa mga dinaogdaog.

Karong Domingoha kita gidasig, una sa tanan, sa paghatag og dakong bili sa Pulong sa Dios. Ang Pulong sa Ginoo mao ang pagkaon sa atong kalag. Ang Salmo karong adlawa nagpahinumdom kanato nga ang Pulong sa Dios maoy maghatag og bag-ong kinabuhi, kaalam sa mga yano, kalipay sa kasingkasing sa mga tawo ug lamdag sa atong mga mata (Salmo 18:7-9). Busa, angay gayod nga sa matag adlaw atong busgon ang atong kaugalingon sa mga Pulong sa Ginoo. Mahimo nato kini pinaagi sa makanunayong pagbasa ug pagpamalandong sa Balaang Kasulatan. Ang Simbahang Pilipinhon nagdeklara ning semanaha nga “National Bible Week” aron dasigon ang katawhan sa pagbasa, pagtoon ug pagpamalandong sa mga Pulong sa Ginoo.

Ug ikaduha, ang Simbahan naghagit kanato sa pagtrabaho uban sa Ginoo alang sa katumanan sa Iyang plano para sa mga kabos, dinaogdaog ug nagkalisod. Pinaagi sa atong bunyag, kita nakaambit dili lamang sa dignidad ni Hesus kondili sa Iya usab nga misyon. Sama kang Cristo, kita adunay tawag sa paghatag sa kaugalingon alang sa pagpagaan sa kalisod sa mga kabos, pagpalingkawas sa mga naulipon sa sala, ug sa paghatag og maayong panig-ingnan alang sa mga kulang og kahibalo.

Diha sa ikaduhang pagbasa, gihulagway ni San Pablo ang katawhan sa Dios isip “Lawas ni Kristo”. Kini maoy iyang pamaagi sa pagdasig kanato sa pag-alagad sa usag-usa. Sanglit kabahin man kita sa usa ka lawas, angay gayod nga maghunahuna kita sa kaayohan sa tanan. Dili maayo nga ang atong kaugalingon lamang ang atimanon o amomahon. Gani, si Pablo mipasabot nga angay natong hatagan og pabor ang mga nagkalisod sama nga ang Dios mihatag og mas dakong pagtagad sa mga anaa sa ubos sa katilingban (1 Cor. 12:22-25). Ug midugang pa gayod si Pablo sa pag-ingon: “Kon usa ka sakop ang mag-antos, dapat mag-antos ang tanan uban kaniya; kon adunay usa ka miyembro nga mapasidunggan, angay nga magsadya ang tanan uban kaniya” (1 Cor. 12:25-26).

Pamalandongan nato kini:

  1. Matod sa Bibliya, “Ang tawo mabuhi dili sa pan lamang kondili sa matag Pulong nga mogawas sa baba sa Dios.” Ang pangutana mao kini: ato bang gipakaon matag adlaw sa pagkaon nga espirituhanon ang atong kaugalingon?
  2. Sa atong pagpaminaw sa Pulong sa Dios, natandog ba kita ug nadasig sa pagsunod sa panig-ingnan ni Kristo, ilabina sa iyang pag-atiman sa mga kabos? Posted by Abet Uy

Source: abetuy.blogspot.com/2016/01/3rd-sunday-in-ordinary-time-year-c.html

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Third Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C)

Neh 8:2-4,5-6,8-10; 1Cor 12:12-30 (12:12-14,27); Luke 1:1-4:4-21

The Beginning of the Galilean Ministry

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES from Deacon Pat

Catholic Diversity – Yet United

Last weekend I heard a great homily by Father Jonathan Molina that spoke of the Body of Christ, most specifically the Body of Christ within the Catholic Church. It is easy to identify the differences that we all have, but we must never forget, just like a traditional family, there is conflict at times, disagreement, and even fighting, yet we are family.

In his humility, Father Jonathan stated that this homily was not entirely original, borrowed and adapted (However, are not most homilies similarly borrowed and adapted?)

Homily – 3rd Sunday in Ordinary Time C

Describing the Catholic Church, James Joyce, an Irish writer and poet, once said, “Here comes everybody.”

What an apt description! Here comes everybody.

Here comes Peter, the denier. Here comes Thomas the doubter. Here comes Judas, the betrayer.

Here comes Augustine, a converted pagan. Here comes Ignatius, a soldier. Thomas Aquinas, a philosopher. Here comes Paul, a tent-maker.

Here comes the outspoken Catherine of Sienna and the quiet Therese of Lisieux.

Here comes Martin de Porres, Juan Diego, Father Damien, Lorenzo Ruiz. Here comes Francis, preaching to the birds and Claire, dancing in the fields.

We are all that and even more.

We are monks who copied scripture onto parchment, and preserved God’s word during one of the darkest times in history.

We are priests and nuns who could barely speak the language, but came to an unruly place called America and created the most extensive parochial school system on earth, passing on what we knew, and what we believed.

We are laborers from Italy and Poland and Germany and Ireland who arrived in Brooklyn with nothing, and left behind towering temples of stone and glass in what we now call a City of Churches.

We are G.K. Chesterton, Thomas Merton, Pope John Paul.
We are John Wayne, Oscar Wilde and Susan Boyle. We are Newt Gingrich, Ted Kennedy, Tony Blair and Fulton Sheen. We are Sean Hannity and even Michael Moore.

We are Oscar Romero and Dorothy Day and Caesar Chavez and Mother Theresa.

We are the soldier in Iraq praying the rosary, we are the teenager who walked the Walk for Life today in San Francisco, we are the woman in Haiti – devastated and lost, we are the immigrant in the barrio with Our Lady of Guadalupe tattooed on our back.

We are Fr. Corapi and Fr. Hebda. We are Fr. Uriel and Fr. Jonathan. We are Deacon Ray, Deacon Pat and Deacon Everett. We are Mother Angelica and Sr. Maura.

We are the Knights of Columbus and Catholic Daughters of America. We are the St. Vincent de Paul Society and the Agape Charismatic Prayer Group.

We are young and old, rich and poor. We are saints and sinners. Yet, we are – the Body of Christ. Not perfect. Not whole. Broken. Bruised. In need of healing, in need of grace. Yet we are – the body of Christ.

Like a stained glass window. We are those different glasses. Some are blue, some are green, some are yellow, some are gold. Some are big, some are small.

When we bring our faces close to the stained glass window, we can admire the beauty of each glass, the way it’s cut colored, and shaped.

But as we step back from it, we can see that all these different glasses, all these different colors and shapes reveal to us another beautiful picture, a more complete picture, telling a story none of these different stained glasses can tell by itself.

That is what being the body of Christ is about.
That is what our life in a community is about.

Each of us is like a little glass with a different shape and color, yet a little piece of a magnificent work of art. No one can really say, “You are different. You do not belong. I do not need you. I alone make God visible” – No – only together, as everybody, do we reveal the body of Christ, the face of God to the world.

Let others who see us then – as the Catholic Church, as the Catholic Church in this Northern part of California, as the parish of Our Lady of Mercy, be able say to say: “They make God visible.”

That is what being the body of Christ is about!

Source: deaconpathomily.blogspot.com/search/label/Catholic%20Diversity%20-%20Yet%20United

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Third Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C)

Neh 8:2-4,5-6,8-10; 1Cor 12:12-30 (12:12-14,27); Luke 1:1-4:4-21

The Beginning of the Galilean Ministry

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES from Missionary Society of the Philippines

2013 3rd SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME: JESUS RETURNED TO GALILEE IN THE SPIRIT’S POWER

Lk 1:1-4; 4:14-21

THE GOSPEL TODAY features the return of Jesus to his native province, Galilee. By that time, the Galileans must have already heard about his fame: his preaching, his healing of the sick, and his casting out of demons. Well, they must be proud of him as a fellow Galilean. His return to his town Nazareth was unexpected. But people must have been excited to hear him speak. The scene was kind of dramatic. Reading a passage from the book of Isaiah, he then told the people, “Today this scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing.”

Now, let us try to reflect some of the important moments in the gospel.

First, there is a mention of the Spirit in the passage. Accordingly, Jesus returned to Galilee “in the power of the Spirit.” Jesus, who was conceived by the Spirit, is now a bearer of the Spirit. Before he began his public ministry, he was driven by the Spirit to the desert. At his baptism, the Spirit was present. Now, in his public ministry, the Spirit is all the more present. So, there is a linkage between Jesus and the Spirit. Elsewhere in the gospels, Jesus talks about his oneness with the Father. Now, the gospel says about his oneness with the Spirit. What does this do to us? On the one hand, this passage is a good aid for us to understand better and deeper our belief in one God: the unity of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. On the other, this also leads us to realize that, like Jesus, we are a “Spirited-people.” Let us not forget the presence of the Spirit in our lives, allow him to work in us, and follow where he leads us.

Second, Jesus’ return to Galilee and Nazareth shows how important it is to link ourselves to our roots. Jesus remembers the place where he grew up. He must have remembered too the things he used to do in that place. And one of these was to go to the synagogue and read a scripture passage. In life, homecoming or coming home is considered important. People who have a happy childhood would naturally love to “come home.” But for people who have sad memories during their childhood would never dare to “come home.” Our past, our childhood, whether happy or sad, is part of our life. In the road toward wholeness, the recommendation is to always go back to our roots.

Third, let us reflect on his solemn declaration, “Today this scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing.” He declares himself as the expected Messiah who fulfills the prophecy of Isaiah. It can also be viewed as the call to mission because of the “bringing of glad tidings to the poor, liberty to captives, sight to the blind….” We can relate this to our baptismal promises. When we were baptized, the Church did not look at our own merits, but to the faith of our parents and godparents. Thus, there must be a time in our life that we express our “owning” of this faith, as well as our “fulfilling” of the baptismal promises, that is, the call to mission. Like Jesus, we must also learn how to say to the Church and God that, “Today, this passage is fulfilled in your hearing.” It should be clear to us that when we receive the sacrament of confirmation, we become missionaries because we are to bring good news to others. The bringing of good news is part of our Christian responsibility. We must be expressive of our faith so that we could also share it with others.

But certainly, it requires that we should first put our own house in order. We need to accept first the good news of Jesus and invite him in our lives. Only then we can share it with others.

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2016 3rd SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME: THE COMING HOME OF JESUS

Lk 1:1-4; 4:14-21

THE GOSPEL TODAY features the return of Jesus to his native province, Galilee. By that time, the Galileans must have already heard about his fame: his preaching, his healing of the sick, and his casting out of demons. Well, they must be proud of him as a fellow Galilean. His return to his town Nazareth was unexpected. But people must have been excited to hear him speak. The scene was kind of dramatic. Reading a passage from the book of Isaiah, he then told the people, “Today this scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing.”

Now, let us try to reflect some of the important moments in the gospel.

Firstly, there is a mention of the Spirit in the passage. Accordingly, Jesus returned to Galilee “in the power of the Spirit.” Jesus, who was conceived by the Spirit, is now a bearer of the Spirit. Before he began his public ministry, he was driven by the Spirit to the desert. At his baptism, the Spirit was present. Now, in his public ministry, the Spirit is all the more present. So, there is a linkage between Jesus and the Spirit. Elsewhere in the gospels, Jesus talks about his oneness with the Father. Now, the gospel says about his oneness with the Spirit. What does this do to us? On the one hand, this passage is a good aid for us to understand better and deeper our belief in one God: the unity of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. On the other, this also leads us to realize that, like Jesus, we are a “Spirited-people.” Let us not forget the presence of the Spirit in our lives, allow him to work in us, and follow where he leads us.

Secondly, Jesus’ return to Galilee and Nazareth shows how important it is to link ourselves to our roots. Jesus remembers the place where he grew up. He must have remembered too the things he used to do in that place. And one of these was to go to the synagogue and read a scripture passage. In life, homecoming or coming home is considered important. People who have a happy childhood would naturally love to “come home.” But for people who have sad memories during their childhood would never dare to “come home.” Our past, our childhood, whether happy or sad, is part of our life. In the road toward wholeness, the recommendation is to always go back to our roots.

Thirdly, let us reflect on his solemn declaration, “Today this scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing.” He declares himself as the expected Messiah who fulfills the prophecy of Isaiah. It can also be viewed as the call to mission because of the “bringing of glad tidings to the poor, liberty to captives, sight to the blind….” We can relate this to our baptismal promises. When we were baptized, the Church did not look at our own merits, but to the faith of our parents and godparents. Thus, there must be a time in our life that we express our “owning” of this faith, as well as our “fulfilling” of the baptismal promises, that is, the call to mission. Like Jesus, we must also learn how to say to the Church and God that, “Today, this passage is fulfilled in your hearing.” It should be clear to us that when we receive the sacrament of confirmation, we become missionaries because we are to bring good news to others. The bringing of good news is part of our Christian responsibility. We must be expressive of our faith so that we could also share it with others.

But certainly, it requires that we should first put our own house in order. We need to accept first the good news of Jesus and invite him in our lives. Only then we can share it with others.

Source: msp.org.ph/homilies.do?id=21867

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2019 3rd SUNDAY IN ORDINARY TIME: THE SPIRIT OF THE LORD IS UPON ME

Lk 1:1-4; 4:14-21
THE GOSPEL TODAY features the return of Jesus to his native province, that is, Galilee. By that time, the Galileans must have already heard about his fame: his preaching, his healing of the sick, and his casting out of demons. Well, they must be proud of Him as a fellow Galilean. His return to his town Nazareth was unexpected. But people must have been excited to hear Him speak. The scene was a kind of dramatic. Reading a passage from the book of Isaiah, He then told the people, “Today this scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing.”

Let us reflect on some of the important moments in the gospel.

Firstly, Jesus is the bearer of the Spirit. The gospel text says that Jesus returned to Galilee “in the power of the Spirit.” There is a significant role of the Spirit in the life of Jesus. Like, for example, He was conceived by the Holy Spirit. Then before He began his public ministry, He was driven by the Spirit to the desert. At his baptism, the Spirit was present in a form of a dove. Now, in his public ministry, the Spirit is all the more present. So, there is a linkage between Jesus and the Spirit. Elsewhere in the gospels, Jesus talks about his oneness with the Father. This gospel passage says about Jesus’ oneness with the Spirit.

How important is this to us? On the one hand, this passage helps us understand better our belief in one God: the unity of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit. On the other hand, this also leads us to realize that, like Jesus, we are a “Spirited-people.” Let us not forget the presence of the Spirit in our lives; let us allow Him to work in us, and we try to follow where He leads us.

Secondly, Jesus’ return to Galilee and Nazareth shows how important it is to link himself to His roots. Jesus remembers the place where He grew up. He must have remembered the things He used to do in that place. And one of these was to go to the synagogue and read a scripture passage.

In our life, homecoming is considered important. People who have a happy childhood would naturally love to “come home.” But for people who have sad memories during their childhood would not want to “come home.” However, our past, whether happy or sad, is part of our life. In the road toward wholeness, the recommendation is to always go back to our roots.

Thirdly, after reading a passage from the book of the prophet Isaiah, Jesus declares, “Today this scripture passage is fulfilled in your hearing.” He declares himself as the expected Messiah who fulfills the prophecy of Isaiah. This can be also considered as the call to mission because of the “bringing of glad tidings to the poor, liberty to captives, sight to the blind….”

We can relate this to our baptismal and confirmation promises. When we received these two sacraments of initiation, we have become missionaries because we are called to bring good news to others. The bringing or sharing of good news to others is part of our Christian responsibility. That is why we have been called to be expressive of our faith by fulfilling the sacramental promises. AMEN.

Source: msp.org.ph/homilies.do?id=25937

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Third Sunday in Ordinary Time (Year C)

Neh 8:2-4,5-6,8-10; 1Cor 12:12-30 (12:12-14,27); Luke 1:1-4:4-21

The Beginning of the Galilean Ministry

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES from Kiliti ng Diyos

B.I.B.L.E. – Basic Information Before Leaving Earth: Reflection for 3rd Sunday in Ordinary Time Year C – January 20, 2012 – Bible Sunday and Year of Faith

Isang barbero na naging “Bible Christian” ang nakaisip na ipalaganap sa kanyang mga “customers” ang Salita ng Diyos sa Bibliya.  Masyado siyang na-inspire sa mga pangangaral na kanyang narinig kaya’t naisip niya na gamitin ang kanyang propesyon bilang barbero upang magbahagi ng mga aral tungkol sa Diyos sa halip na “kuwentong barbero” ang pinag-uusapan nila ng kanyag mga parokyano habang nagpapagupit,.  Kaya’t winika niya sa Panginoon: “Lord, kung sino man ang unang papasok sa aking barberya ay pangangaralan ko ng iyong Salita.”  Nagkataong may pumasok agad na isang lalaki at nagsabing gusto niyang magpaahit.  “Yes sir, saglit ng po!” At pumasok saglit sa kanyang silid ang barbero at nagdasal muli.  “Lord, ito na ang pagkakataong ibinigay mo. Ipapangaral ko na ang iyong Salita!”  Lumabas ang barbero tangan-tangan ang labaha sa kanang kamay at ang Bibliya sa kaliwa. Hinarap ang customer at buong sigasig na nagsalita: “Kapatid… handan ka na bang mamatay?” At kumaripas ng takbo ang customer… hehe.   Ano nga ba ang Bibliya?  Ang sagot ng isang bata ay napaksimple pero makahulugan.  Ang B.I.B.L.E. daw ay:  Basic Information Before Leaving Earth!  (Tama pala ang barbero na nasa kanang kamay ang labaha at kaliwa naman ang Bibliya!)  Tunay nga naman na dapat bago lisanin ang mundo ay nabasa natin ang Bibliya.      Sapagkat ang Bibliya ay hindi lamang aklat na naglalaman ng Salita ng Diyos. Ito ay naglalaman din ng Kanyang kalooban para sa ating lahat.  Ito ay gabay para sa ating pamumuhay bilang mga Kristiyano.  Kaya nga’t nakakalungkot isipin na lilisanin mo ang mundong ito na hindi man lamang nabuklat ang Bibliya at hindi mo nabasa ang Kanyang salita.  Ang ikatlong Linggo ng Enero ay inilalaan upang paalalahanan tayo ng kahalagahan ng Kanyang Salita sa pagdiriwang ng Bible Sunday. Ano ba ang mga maari nating gawin upang mapahalagahan ang Salita ng Diyos?  Ngayong Taon ng Pananampalataya ay marami tayong maaring gawin. Una, dumalo sa Misa at makinig ng mabuti sa mga Salita ng Diyos na binabasa sa atin at ipinaliliwanag.  Baka naman nakatapos ka ng Misa na hindi mo maalaala ang mga pagbasa at ang paliwanag ng pari? Pangalawa, magbasa ng Bibliya araw-araw.  Imposible ito kung wala kang sipi ng Bibliya .  Kung nakakaya mong bumili ng mamahahiling gadgets at ibang kagamitan at walang dahilan para hindi ka makabili ng aklat na ito.  Pangatlo, pag-aralan ang Salita ng Diyos sa pagdalo sa mga Bible Study o Bible Sharing na ginagawa sa inyong Parokya. (Hindi sa mga Born-Again groups).  Kailangang pag-aralan ang Kanyang Salita sapagkat nagtataglay ito ng mga katotohanan ng ating Pananampalataya. Ang mga pagbasa natin sa Linggong ito ay dapat magbigay sa atin ng inspirasyon.  Sa unang pagbasa ay narinig natin kung paano naantig ang damdamin ng mga Israelita ng marinig nila ang Salita ng Diyos.  Napaluha pa nga sila dahil sa nakaligtaan nila ito ng matagal.  Sa Ebanghelyo ay narinig natin si Jesus na inako ang karapatan na ipahayag ang Salita ng Diyos sapagkat siya mismo ang katuparan nito. Nawa ay maisapuso natin ang tunay na pagmamahal sa Salita ng Diyos.  Basahin. pagnilyan. dasalin at isabuhay natin ang Kanynag Salita.  Kapag nagawa natin ito ay masasabi nating handang-handa na tayo para sa buhay sa kabila.  Tunay na ang Bibliya ay “Basic Information Before Leaving Earth!”

Source: kiliti-ng-diyos.blogspot.com

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SABADO, ENERO 23, 2016

KATAWAN NI KRISTO: Reflection for 3rd Sunday in Ordinary Time Year C – January 24, 2016 – YEAR OF THE EUCHARIST & FAMILY – JUBILEE YEAR OF MERCY

Isang malaking pagpapala para sa ating mga Pilipino na ang ating bansa ay muling hinirang na pagdarausan ng International Eucharistic Congress.  Ito ang ika-51 pagtitipon ng mga obispo, pari, pinunong layko at kinatawan ng iba’t ibang sektor ng Simbahan at lipunan mula sa iba’t ibang panig ng mundo upang magbigay saksi sa tunay na presensiya ng Panginoong Jesus sa Banal na Eukaristiya.  Huling ginanap ito sa Pilipinas noong taong Pebrero 3-7, 1937 sa Manila na siya ring kauna-unahang kongreso na ginanap sa Asia.  At ngayon nga ito ay kasalukuyang ginaganap sa siyudad ng Cebu na magtatapos sa Enero 31, 2016.   Napapanahon para sa ating mga Pilipino ang pagdiriwang na ito sapagkat marami sa ating mga Katoliko ang hindi na nakababatid sa tunay na kahulugan ng tunay na presensiya ng Panginoong Jesus sa Banal na Eukasristiya.  Hindi lang ito nangangahulugan ng pag-aatanda ng krus sa tuwing ang jeep na ating sinasakyan ay daraan sa isang simbahan (na kung minsan nga ay mali pa ang ating pag-aantanda).  Hindi lang ito nangangahulugan paglalakad ng nakaluhod mula sa bukana ng simbahan papuntang dambana. Lalo namang hindi lang ito pag-aabuloy sa tuwing tayo ay dumadalo ng Misa.  Minsang tinanong ko ang isang batang Grade 3 na kandidato sa First Communion: “Ano ang kaibahan ng krusipiho na aking hawak-hawak sa Banal na Ostia na tatanggapin mo sa Komunyon?”  Nagulat ako sa kanyang sagot sapagkat ang karaniwang bata ay magsasabing, “Father, ang Ostia ay nakakain, ang krusipiho ay hindi!”  O kaya naman. “Ang Ostia ay bilog at puti, ang krusipiho ay hindi.”  Ngunit ang batang ito ay nagbigay ng kasagutang nagpapahayag ng isang malalim na pananampalataya: “Father, ang krusipiho ay kamukha ni Kristo pero hindi sa Kristo.  Ang Banal na Ostia ay hindi kamukha ni Kristo ngunit ito ang TUNAY NA KRISTO!”  Kamangha-mangha!  Batid ng batang ito ang kahulugan ng Ostiang kanyang tatanggapin.  Isang pagmumulat sa ating mga Katolikong Kristiyano sapagkat marami sa atin na ang akala ay simbolo lamang ni Kristo ang Banal na Ostia.  Kaya nga marahil ay malimit na wala sa loob ang ating pagtanggap dito.  Hindi pinaghandaan.  Kulang sa paniniwala.  May mga ilan na hindi naman nagsisimba sapagkat buong misa ay kausap ang katabi o busy sa pagtetext ang at makikita mong pipila at tatanggap ng Komunyon. May mga ilang late ng dumating sa Misa, halos kalahati na ang inabutan at nagkokomunyon pa rin.  May ilan namang nahahaluan pa ito ng pamahiin.  May kilala akong sabungero na itinago ang Ostia at ipinatuka sa kanyang manok sa pag-aakalang lalakas at siguradong walang talo ito dahil nasa kanya si Kristo. Ayun, isinabong at ipinusta ang kanyang buong suweldo at… talo! Patay ang manok!  Marahil ay talagang napapanahunan na para maintindihan natin ang kahulugan ng dakilang sakramentong ito.  Unang katotohanan na dapat nating paniwalaan, si Jesus na tunay na Diyos ay nasa Banal na Eukaristiya kaya’t nararapat lang bigyan natin siya ng nararapat na pagpaparangal, paggalang at pagsamba!  At sa bawat pagtanggap nito ay dapat nagpapanibago ito sa atin tungo sa kabanalan.  Ikalawa, sa tuwing tayo ay tumatanggap ng Banal na Komunyon ay hindi lamang ang presensiya ni Jesus sa Banal na Ostia ang ating tinatanggap sapagkat ang katawan ni Kristo ay hindi lang nalilimita dito.  Sa Sulat ni San Pablo sa mga taga-Corinto ay sinabi niya na tayo ang bumubuo sa katawan ni Kristo!  Siya ang ulo at tayo ang mga bahagi ng kanyang katawan.  Kaya nga’t kung kaya natin siyang tanggapin sa Banal sa Ostia ay dapat kaya rin natin siyang tanggapin sa ating kapwa.  Ibig sabihin, handa kang tumanggap, umunawa, at magpatawad lalo na sa mga hindi mo kasundo o may kasamaan ka ng loob.  Malaki ang hinihingi sa atin ng ating pananampalatayang Kristiyano.  “Ang pananampalatayang walang kasamang gawa ay pananampalatayang patay” sabi ni Santiago Apostol.  Mahalagang bahagi ng ating pananampalataya ang konkretong pagsasabuhay nito.  Nawa ay maipakita natin ito sa Banal na Eukasitiya.  Tayo na bumubuo ng Katawan ni Kristo ay dapat magpakita ng pagmamahal at awa sa isa’t isa. Ipinaskil ni kalakbay ng kabataan

Source: kiliti-ng-diyos.blogspot.com/2016/01/katawan-ni-kristo-reflection-for-3rd.html

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SABADO, ENERO 26, 2019

BIBLE CHRISTIAN KA BA? : Reflection for 3rd Sunday in Ordinary Time Year C – January 27, 2019 – YEAR OF THE YOUTH

Ano ba ang ibig sabihin ng Biblia?  May isang lola na nagbabasa ng Bibliya at habang siya ay nagbabasa ay pinagmamasdan siya ng kanyang apo. Manghang-mangha ang bata sa panood sa kanya.  Lumapit ito at nagtanong: “Lola, alam ko na po ang ibig sabihin ng Biblia!”  Tuwang-tuwa ang matanda at nagtanong: “Ano, yon apo?” Sagot ng bata: “Ang kahulugan ng BIBLE ay nasa limang titik nito: Basic Information Before Leaving Earth! Kailan ka mamamatay lola?”  Ano nga ba ang Biblia? Paano nga ba ang tamang pagbasa at pag-intindi nito? “May isang “Bible Christian” na mahilig gamitin ang Bibliya upang malaman kung ano ang gusto ng Diyos sa kanya lalo na sa paglutas sa kanyang mga prolema. Minsan ay nalugi ang kanyang negosyo at katulad ng kanyang nakaugalian ay sumangguni siya sa Bibliya. Kinuha niya ito at nakapikit na binuksan ang pahina. Laking pagkagulat niya ng bumungad sa kanya ang Mateo 27:5 na nagsasabing: “Lumabas si Hudas at nagbigti!”. Natakot siya at sinubukan niyang maghanap uli. Habang nakapikit ay muli niyang binuksan ang Bibliya at ang kanyang hintuturo ay tumapat sa Lukas 10:37 na ang sabi: “Humayo ka’t gayon din ang gawin mo.”Halos himatayin na siya sa takot nang muli niyang buksan ang Banal na Aklat. Ang bumungad sa kanyang talata: Juan 13:27, “Kung ano ang iyong kailangang gawin, gawin mo na agad!” At alam n’yo na marahil ang kasunod… hehe.  Ang ikatlong Linggo ng Karaniwang Panahon ay parating inilalaan sa padiriwang ng National Bible Sunday!  Ang Bibliya ay hindi parang “Libro ng mga Hula” na nagsasabi ng ating kapalaran. Hindi rin ito katulad ng mga “Best Seller” na libro sa National Books Store. Hindi lang ito naglalaman ng kasaysayan o pamantayan sa mabuting pamumuhay. Ang Bibliya ay ang SALITA NG DIYOS!  Ito ang aklat na kung saan ay ipinahayag ng Diyos ang Kanyang pag-ibig at katapatan sa tao sa pagbibigay sa atin ng kaligtasan. Sa Ebanghelyo ay nakita natin kung paano nangaral si Hesus ng buong sigasig! Ang Bibiliya ay ang pangangaral ni Hesus sa atin sa kasalukuyang panahon.  May oras ba akong inalalaan sa pagbabasa ng Bibliya? Baka naman may “tag price” pa ang Bibliya kong nabili o kaya naman ay namumuti na sa dami ng alikabok dahil hindi ko nagagalaw sa pinaglalagyan nito!  Kung me tiyaga kang tapusin ang libro ng paborito mong nobela o kaya naman ay wala kang sawa sa pagdodownload at pagbabasa ng mga e-books ay bakit kaya ni isang pahina ng Bibiliya ay hindi mo matagalang basahin? Ang sabi nga nila: Kung gusto mo may paraan… kung ayaw mo, may dahilan!  Ugaliin natin ang araw-araw na pagbabasa ng Bibliya! Sa panalangin tayo ang nakikipag-usap sa Kanya. Sa pagbabasa ng Bibliya… Siya ang nakikipag-usap sa atin.  Sa pakikipag-usap sa atin ng Diyos sa Banal na Kasulatan ay ipinahahayag Niya ang Kanyang kalooban.  Kailan mo hinayaang kausapin ka Niya? Ngunit hindi lang sapat na basahin ang Bibiliya. Mas mahalaga sa pagbabasa ay ang pagninilay sa Salita ng Diyos at ang pagsasabuhay nito. May mga Kristiyanong pabibilibin ka dahil kaya nilang banggitin mula sa memorya ang mga kapitulo at bersikulo ng Biblia. Ang tanong… isinasabuhay ba nila ito?  Saulo mo man ito mula sa unang pahina hanggang sa huli ngunit hindi mo pinagninilayan at isinasabuhay ay para ka lamang “wang-wang” na nag-iingay na walang mabuting nagagawa sa kaligtasan ng iyong kaluluwa at ng kaluluwa ng iba.  Ang mga pagbasa natin sa Linggong ito ay dapat magbigay sa atin ng inspirasyon.  Sa unang pagbasa ay narinig natin kung paano naantig ang damdamin ng mga Israelita ng marinig nila ang Salita ng Diyos.  Napaluha pa nga sila dahil sa nakaligtaan nila ito ng matagal.  Sa Ebanghelyo ay narinig natin si Jesus na inako ang karapatan na ipahayag ang Salita ng Diyos sapagkat siya mismo ang katuparan nito. Nawa ay maisapuso natin ang tunay na pagmamahal sa Salita ng Diyos.  Basahin, pagnilayan o ipanalangin at isabuhay! Ito ang paraan upang matawag na mga tunay na “Bible Christians”.  Nawa ay pahalagahan natin ang Salita ng Diyos sa ating buhay.  May nabasa akong isang mensahe sa Facebook tungkol sa pagpapahalaga sa Bibliya.  Ganito ang kanyang sinasabi:  “What of we began to treat our Bibles that way we treat our cellphones? What if we carried it with us everywhere?  What if we turned back to go get it if we forgot it?  What if we checked it our for messages through out the day? What if we used it in case of emergency? What if we spent an hour or more using it each day?”  Ipinaskil ni kalakbay ng kabataan

Source: kiliti-ng-diyos.blogspot.com/2019/01/bible-christian-ka-ba-reflection-for.html

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See Today’s Readings: Cycle C

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