Friday of the 7th Week of Easter

  • John 21:15-19
  • Jesus and Peter

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES from 365 Days With The Lord

GOSPEL:

15 When [Jesus and the disciples] had finished breakfast, Jesus said to Simon Peter, “Simon, son of John, do you love me more than these?” He said to him, “Yes, Lord, you know that I love you.” He said to him, “Feed my lambs.” 16 He then said to him a second time, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” He said to him, “Yes, Lord, you know that I love you.” He said to him, “Tend my sheep.” 17 He said to him the third time, “Simon, son of John, do you love me?” Peter was distressed that he had said to him a third time, “Do you love me?” and he said to him, “Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you.” [Jesus] said to him, “Feed my sheep. 18 Amen, amen, I say to you, when you were younger, you used to dress yourself and go where you wanted; but when you grow old, you will stretch out your hands, and someone else will dress you and lead you where you do not want to go.” 19 He said this signifying by what kind of death he would glorify God. And when he had said this, he said to him, “Follow me.”

REFLECTION:

2007 This gospel episode is quite inexhaustible in terms of depth of meaning, richness of teaching, levels of symbolism. Among many aspects of it which come to mind, one is the fact that it happened a very short time – at most, a few weeks – after Peter denied Jesus three times on the night of His interrogation by the Jewish tribunal. Yet, that betrayal in no way dissuades Jesus from building His Church on Peter. Not that Jesus ignores the betrayal. He does not. In fact, He is very careful to give Peter a chance to nullify his betrayal with three protests of love. For Jesus knows that Peter’s betrayal, by making him more humble, can be positively integrated into Peter’s total destiny. Because God uses even our past sins and mistakes for our own good – if we sincerely disown them. Psychologist Adrian van Kaam, in his book The Dynamics of Spiritual Self-Direction, explains how this all works out:

“God can help us,” he writes, “to make the best of the past so that nothing is wasted in our lives. During the years that we were perhaps not yet totally in line with our true self-direction, we have been gathering experience, information and understanding, both of ourselves and of the secular society around us. God used that growing awareness to lead to this point of dissatisfaction and of discernment of new and better possibilities of life. We should show our gratefulness and trust in Him by not lamenting what has been while wasting the possibilities of today and tomorrow. Nobody can change the past as such; everybody can change the impact of the past on the future. Even the negative experiences of the past can help us to prevent similar mistakes in our new life direction. Nothing in our lives is wasted” (pp. 266-267).

SOURCE: “365 Days with the Lord,” ST PAULS, 7708 St. Paul Rd., SAV, Makati City (Phils.); Tel.: 895-9701; Fax 895-7328; E-mail: publishing@stpauls.ph; Website: stpauls.ph.

2008 Peter had three times denied Jesus in His final suffering and, in today’s Gospel reading, the risen Lord sought His love and forgave him. Jesus began by asking Peter three times whether Peter loved Him – a central question of every Christian’s life. Peter, however, was sad and confused. Was Jesus alluding to his sin of denying Him three times and asking, “Do you love Me now, at last?” Or was Jesus asking, “Do you love Me more than you love your nets, your boat, and a catch of fish?” Or was He asking, “Do you love Me more than your fellow disciples do?”

By now, Peter was aware that he had often left much to be desired. And he’d been made compassionate by his own need for forgiveness and mercy. Love, humility, contrition, and obedience to the Lord were to be the hallmarks of Peter’s future ministry. His glorious side enabled him to grow in fidelity.

Peter would now no longer dare to say anything that would put him above the rest: No bold claims, no rash promises. He couldn’t even answer with the same word for “love” that Jesus used. In asking Peter if he loved Him, Jesus’ word – agapas in the Greek of John’s Gospel – connoted sacrifice. So, unsure of whether he was capable of that highest kind of love, he answered by affirming, in the Gospel’s original Greek, philo. This meant a love of sentiment, of affection, of attachment. Of those he was sure.

SOURCE: “366 Days with the Lord,” ST PAULS, 7708 St. Paul Rd., SAV, Makati City (Phils.); Tel.: 895-9701; Fax 895-7328; E-mail: publishing@stpauls.ph; Website: stpauls.ph.

2009 Follow me: Peter denies the Lord three times, and Jesus gives him a chance to redeem himself by asking him to profess his love the same number of times. After Peter reaffirms his love for the Lord, he is given a new commission—a pastoral one. When Jesus first calls him from his occupation of catching fish, Peter is told that he will be catching men (Lk 5:10, Mk 1:17). Here, he is told to feed the Lord’s lambs, tend his sheep, and feed his sheep (vv 15-17).
How seriously Peter takes this second commission may be seen from his letter to the new Christian communities. He urges them to “tend the flock of God” so faithfully that they may receive an unfading crown of glory at the manifestation of the chief Shepherd (1 Pt 5:1-4).
In words which echo the first call of the disciples (Jn 1:43), Jesus concludes Peter’s commission with a command: “Follow me” (v 19). And Peter does follow Jesus—as his disciple, unto death. Indeed, his protestation is fulfilled: “I will lay down my life for you” (Jn 13:37).

2010 FEED MY LAMBS Ancient Near Eastern texts traditionally depict the king as a king-shepherd who provides for the well-being of his subjects. In the Bible, Jeremiah rebukes the kings of Israel for their slackness in office (Jer 2:8; 10:21). The prophet proclaims that Yahweh will give Israel new shepherds who will pasture the people with integrity (Jer 3:15). Ezekiel later also rebukes the kings and other leaders for their neglect of the people (Ez 34:1-10). He proclaims that God will take the people, his flock, out of the charge of their human leaders. God declares himself the shepherd of the people (Ez 34:11-22; Ps 23; Is 40:11). In time, God will give the people a shepherd of his own choice, another David (Ez 34:23-24).
Jesus sees his relationship with the crowd that follow him as that of a shepherd and sheep (Mt 9:36-37). His compassion makes Jesus feed the crowd. Later, Jesus proclaims himself as the “Good Shepherd” who lays down his life for his flock (Jn 10).
Jesus’ words to Peter—“Feed my lambs”—can be taken as the giving of a solemn charge to care for and to rule the community of believers in his name. Jesus, the Chief Shepherd (1 Pt 5:4), enters into a contract with Peter as a delegated caretaker. In accordance with the Semitic form of entering an agreement (Gn 23:3-20), Jesus stresses the terms of the agreement three times.
The apostolic tradition will later pass on this image of the shepherd who is “feeding the flock” as a metaphor for Christian leadership (1 Pt 5:1-4; Acts 20:28-29).

2012 Tend my sheep. Jesus gives Peter a graced opportunity to redeem himself. Peter declared that he would lay down his life for Jesus (Jn 13:37), but then, as Jesus predicted, Peter denied his Master three times (Jn 18:17, 25-27). Peter now professes his love for Jesus three times. 

Peter is not only forgiven. He is entrusted with an important mission to work for Jesus: “Tend my sheep… Feed my sheep.” The flock remains the sheep of Jesus. Peter is not given power to rule and dominate. His authority will be seen in understanding, humility, and service—not in dominance, superiority, and privilege. Peter has to be like Jesus, a good shepherd willing to feed, care for, and die for the flock of Jesus.

Whatever happens, Jesus will always receive us back. He will continue to trust us and hope in us. But we have to be sincere and truthful to him. We must admit our limitations and shortcomings. Jesus will again send us on a mission. 

“Do you love me?” How will you answer Jesus’ question?

2013 Do you love me? This is one of the most beautiful scenes in the whole gospel of John. By the lake of Tiberias, Jesus gives Simon Peter a chance to reverse his denial of Jesus during his passion. Three times Peter denied him. Three times Jesus now asks Peter to profess his love. And to show that Peter’s rehabilitation is complete, thrice Jesus gives Peter the charge of his whole flock, his Church.

When we fail Jesus, he gives us a chance to recover. In fact, he gives us more chances than we lost by our sins. Peter recovered and became not only the chief representative-shepherd of Christ’s flock, but gave his life for Jesus and the gospel.

One who is forgiven more, loves more

(cf Lk 7:41-43).

graceandspace.org/welcome/home/365-days-with-the-lord/1718-jesus-and-peter-.html

2016 DO YOU LOVE ME? The original Greek text gives a profound insight into this dialogue between Jesus and Peter. The Greek language has three words for love: Eros, philia, and agape. Twice Jesus asks whether Peter has the highest form of love for Him (agape), but Peter, now more careful after having denied his Master, admits that he has only a love for Jesus that comes naturally (philia). No wonder that Peter is distressed, but then the third question of Jesus surprises us. Jesus now goes down to the level of Peter and asks him whether he has philia for Him. This dialogue tells a lot about Jesus. He first challenges Peter, but when he sees that the apostle is not yet ready for the highest form of love, He meets Peter where he is. But Jesus knows that one day Peter will be able to show his agape when he gives his life for Christ and for his faith. Jesus constantly challenges us to His high ideals—for example, to love even our enemies. But he also understands our weakness and accompanies us further on our way to perfection—if only we allow Him to guide us. With His help and compassion we can reach heaven and be saints one day.

Lord, I have denied You many times. I have shied away from Your challenges. As You understood Peter, understand me and guide me on the way to perfection.

SOURCE: “366 Days with the Lord 2016,” ST. PAULS Philippines, 7708 St. Paul Rd., SAV, Makati City (Phils.); Tel.: 895-9701; Fax 895-7328; E-mail: books@stpauls.ph; Website: stpauls.ph.

mb.com.ph/jesus-and-peter/

2018 Follow me. Jesus says this to Peter to conclude his conversation with him. Has Peter not been following Jesus? Jesus must mean something different now after Peter three times assures Jesus of his love for him and for his flock. Jesus does not have to check on Peter’s loyalty, but to give him an opportunity to articulate his best before giving him a new assignment. Jesus is always thinking ahead. Peter must upgrade his vision and goals to be able to put up with Jesus.

Peter is talking no longer to an ordinary man who was made to suffer and die, but to the Lord who is risen. Things should be different now after the resurrection.

To follow Christ means that Peter will undergo his own passion, death, and resurrection. As a follower of the Risen Lord, Peter will exert more effort. He will serve Jesus’ flock as a leader, a provider, and a martyr. He will lay down his life for the flock.

Following Christ is allowing oneself to be led by Jesus and opening oneself to God’s grand plan of salvation. Peter will nourish a great many people by his preaching. His sharing will be based on his first-hand experience with Jesus since he started his ministry. His words will come straight from his heart and from his memories, and he will die like Christ crucified.

* * *

How are you doing as a follower of Christ?

* * *

SOURCE: “365 Days with the Lord,” ST PAULS, 7708 St. Paul Rd., SAV, Makati City (Phils.); Tel.: 895-9701; Fax 895-7328; E-mail: publishing@stpauls.ph; Website: stpauls.ph.

tempo.com.ph/2018/05/18/jesus-and-peter-2/

2020 Jesus asks this question three times as if to counteract Peter’s threefold denial when Jesus was arrested in Gethsemane (Jn 18:17, 25, 27). In the first two questions, “Do you love me,” Jesus uses the Greek word agape, referring to a love that entails the whole person’s will and readiness for sacrificial love. Peter responds using phileo (affective love). In the third question, Jesus comes down to Peter’s level. The Apostle’s answer, “Yes, Lord, you know that I love you!” is a profession of faith, trust, and belief in Jesus.

Assured of Peter’s undying loyalty, Jesus entrusts the community of believers to Peter with the repeated command, “Feed my lambs,” “tend my sheep,” and “feed my sheep.” Jesus is not mistaken in choosing Simon as the leader, the rock (Kephas, Petros) on which he will build his Church. Peter is now ready to follow Jesus.

* * *

SOURCE: “365 Days with the Lord 2020,” ST. PAULS Philippines, 7708 St. Paul Rd., SAV, Makati City (Phils.); Tel.: 895-9701; Fax 895-7328; E-mail: books@stpauls.ph; Website: stpauls.ph.

tempo.com.ph/2020/05/29/simon-son-of-john-do-you-love-me/

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Friday of the 7th Week of Easter

  • John 21:15-19
  • Jesus and Peter

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES from Verbum Dei Philippines

2020 Verbum Dei Philippines

May 29, 2020 – Friday

Gospel: John 21:15-19

Do you love me? Feed my sheep. 

Jesus asks Simon Peter thrice, “Do you love me?” and after each “Yes” response is a call of “Feed my sheep.” Jesus presents us the same question and same call. Who are the sheep in our life? Jesus want us to concretize our response to Him by taking care and feeding the people He entrusted to us. 

Mother Mary, help us to respond to your call of feeding the sheep entrusted in our care. Amen.

facebook.com/verbumdeiphilippines/photos/a.432918427272/10156823553807273/?type=3&theater

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Friday of the 7th Week of Easter

  • John 21:15-19
  • Jesus and Peter

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES from Shrine of St. Jude

2020 Friday May 29th (2020)

Love grows in intensity as time goes by. It could also lose its force. Jesus however invites Peter into deeper intimacy with Him again by His triple interrogation of the love Peter has for Him. He gives Peter the chance to redeem himself from his triple denial of the Lord during His passion. This episode from the past will be buried this day if Peter will be up to the occasion. Each time the Lord asks Peter and he affirms his love, a corresponding responsibility is placed upon him. This will allow Peter to validate his declaration of love by his readiness to do what the Lord commands him to do. Blessed is that day when Peter was redeemed by love.

shrineofstjude.org/bible-diary-for-may-24th-30th/

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Friday of the 7th Week of Easter

  • John 21:15-19
  • Jesus and Peter

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES from Seminarians’ Musings

2020 Seminarians’ Musings

#DailyGospelMusings for the Friday of the Seventh Week of Easter, 29 May 2020

Christianity is a religion of martyrs. In fact, the English word martyr is directly taken from the Greek word for “witness”. If there are material things and experiences “to die for” which is a hyperbole of great desire and longing, the truths of the Faith which reveal to us the saving face of Jesus is something literally worth dying for. We have been hearing for the past days the troubles Paul went through to proclaim Christ to both Jews and Gentiles, and it seems that there is no stopping to the mission of this great apostle no matter where it leads him. 

Yet today, this is not the case for many of us. People will pant and long for the time when they will visit the mall, or watch their favorite telenovelas, or go on foodtrips and outings with their friends and family, yet rarely do we hear of people actually desiring to go to church in the time of the “new normal”. Many of our clerics are not creative enough to find ways and to work around government prohibitions to provide the sacraments and sacramentals to the faithful. A religion of “martyrs” has now become a “non-essential religion”, where trips to nail care salons, booze shops, and pet care shops are more vital than the longing for God. 

These times of pandemic, are as what Pope Francis says, a time of choosing for each one of us. Like Peter, we are faced each day with the three-fold question of Jesus: “My child, do you love me more than these?”. Let us choose to cling on to our faith, and to express our longing to be able to practice our faith with the community. We may undergo pandemics like these that limit us, or even persecutions that seek to harm us, but let us choose to seek, love, and serve Christ before everything else. If we constantly cower in worry and fear without the courage of standing for Christ and his Church, we will not receive the grace and fortitude that God gives us to live our lives in His love.

facebook.com/seminariansmusings/photos/a.375013106001051/1630245357144480/?type=3&theater

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Friday of the 7th Week of Easter

  • John 21:15-19
  • Jesus and Peter

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES from Linda Schork

2020 Daily Scripture, May 29, 2020

“Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you.

Jesus said to Peter, Feed my sheep.” -John 21:17

Today the Church celebrates the Memorial of St Paul VI, Pope. Since I was a child I have been fascinated by the Papacy. A many years ago I had read three or four books on Pope John XXIII. Then a few years ago I was curious about the background of the Second Vatican Council and read about Pope Pius XI and Pope Pius XII. From my readings, I have come to realize the importance of the papacy in world history. Up until now, I had not considered reading about Saint Paul VI. From the short research, I have done for this reflection it has inspired me to read at least one book this summer about Paul VI.

The Gospel reading for today as well as for the Memorial both have Jesus giving Peter the message about the leadership of the Church. The Memorial Gospel is from Matthew where Peter proclaims that Jesus is the Christ and Jesus then gives Peter the “keys to the Kingdom of Heaven” showing that Peter has authority on earth and that as his vicar, extends to Heaven. In the daily Gospel Jesus asks Peter three times to feed the flock. Commentaries that I have read say that this is to redeem Peter from the three times he denied Jesus. Yes, and along with that an instruction as to how to lead the Church.

The Popes throughout history have helped to give spiritual guidance to the People of God as the events of the time dictate. Pope Paul VI was no different. June 21, 1963, he found himself leading the Church at the beginning of the Second Vatican Council. He would spend the next 15 years focusing on World peace, social justice, World hunger, illiteracy, brotherhood under God and international cooperation. Themes that even speak to us today. We see John Paull II as a great world traveler but Paul VI was the first to visit India and the United States. He was the first to make an extended 10-day journey that included several countries in Africa. He wrote several important Papal Encyclicals such as Ecclesiam Suam (His Church) on concern for workers and the poor; Humanae Vita which addressed birth control; and Popularum Progressio (Progress of the People’s) on social justice; and many others. He looked to what was happening in the world and spoke to that just as any other pope has done. It is not until Pope Francis that I have become most interested in reading papal encyclicals. Pope Francis’ writings are very easy to read and use as a reflection. Their words are written for us to reflect upon and learn more deeply about our faith, our Church. How is Pope Francis feeding the flock these days? What words does he have for us that might comfort and console as we move through this pandemic? On the Vatican website, you can find his daily and Sunday homilies. They are there to feed us. Pull a seat up to the table and enjoy the feast.

May you and your families stay safe and healthy during this time.

Linda Schork is a theology teacher at Saint Xavier High School in Louisville, Kentucky.

passionist.org/daily-scripture-may-29-2020/

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Friday of the 7th Week of Easter

  • John 21:15-19
  • Jesus and Peter

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES from OCarm.

2020 Lectio Divina: John 21:15-19

Lectio Divina

Friday, May 29, 2020

• We are in the last days before Pentecost. During the time of Lent, the selection of the Gospels of the day continues the ancient tradition of the Church. Between Easter and Pentecost, the Gospel of John is preferred. And thus, during these last days before Pentecost, the Gospels of the day narrate the last verses of the Gospel of John. When we return to Ordinary Time, we will go back to the Gospel of Mark. In the weeks of Ordinary Time, the Liturgy proceeds to a continuous reading of the Gospel of Mark (from the 1st to the 9th week of Ordinary Time), of Matthew (from the 10th to 21st week of Ordinary Time) and of Luke (from the 22nd to the 34th week of Ordinary Time).

• The Gospel readings for today and tomorrow speak about Jesus’ last encounter with His disciples. It was an encounter of celebration, marked by tenderness and affection. At the end Jesus calls Peter and asks him three times, “Do you love Me?” Only after having received three times the same affirmative response, Jesus entrusts to Peter the mission of taking care of the sheep. In order to be able to work in the community, Jesus does not ask many things of us. What He asks of us is to have much love!

• John 21:15-17: Love at the center of the mission. After a whole night of fishing in the lake catching not even one fish, they go to the shore.  The disciples discover that Jesus has prepared bread and roasted fish for them. When they finish eating, Jesus calls Peter and asks him three times, “Do you love Me?” Three times, because Peter denied Jesus three times (Jn 18:17,25-27). After the three affirmative responses, Peter also becomes a “Beloved Disciple” and receives the order to take care of the sheep. Jesus does not ask Peter if he has studied exegesis, theology, morals, or canon law. He only asks, “Do you love Me?” Love in the first place. For the communities of the Beloved Disciple the force which supports and maintains unity is love.

• John 21:18-19: The foreshadowing of death. Jesus tells Peter, “Truly I tell you: when you were young, you put on your own belt and walked where you liked; but when you grow old you will stretch out your hands, and somebody else will put a belt around you and take you where you do not want to go!” Throughout life, Peter, and we too, gain maturity. The practice of love will take root in life and people will no longer be the bosses of their own life. Service to the brothers and sisters out of love will prevail and will lead us. How we dress is often a reflection or necessity of the work we do. If we choose to accept it, God can “dress” us in new clothing for a new destination according to His wants, and send us where we may not want to go. Somebody else will put a belt around you and take you where you would rather not go. Fro Peter there is a the meaning, as the Evangelist comments: “He tells him this to indicate the kind of death by which Peter would give glory to God.” Then Jesus adds: “Follow Me.”

• Love in John – Peter, do you love Me? – The Beloved Disciple. The word love is one of the words which we use most nowadays. Precisely because of this, it is a word that has been greatly worn out. But the communities of the Beloved Disciple manifested their identity and their own intentions by this word. To love, is above all, a profound experience of relationship among people in which similar sentiments and values prevail – a care and concern for the other over oneself, as well as joy, sadness, suffering, growth, renunciation, dedication, fulfillment, gift, commitment, life, death. All these together are summarized in the Bible in one single word in the Hebrew language. This word is hesed. It is hard to translate into our language. Generally, in our Bibles it is translated by charity, mercy, fidelity or loving kindness. The communities of the Beloved Disciple sought to live this practice of love in a very radical way. Jesus revealed this in His encounters with people with sentiments of friendship and tenderness, as for example, in His relationship with the family of Martha and Mary of Bethany: “Jesus loved Martha and her sister and Lazarus.” He weeps before the tomb of Lazarus (Jn 11:5,33-36). Jesus always embodies His mission in a manifestation of love: “having loved His own, He loved them to the end” (Jn 13:1). In this love, Jesus manifests His profound identity with the Father (Jn 15:9). For His communities there was no other commandment except this one: “to act as Jesus acted” (1 Jn 2:6). This presupposes “love of the brethren” (1 Jn 2:7-11; 3:11-24; 2 Jn 4-6). Being such a central commandment in the life of the community, love is defined by John as follows: “This is the proof of love that He laid down His life for us and we too ought to lay down our lives for our brothers.” Our love should not be just words or mere talk but something active and genuine.” (1 Jn 3:16-17). Anyone who lives this love and manifests it in words and attitudes becomes a Beloved Disciple.

• Look within yourself and say, “What is the most profound reason that motivates me to work in the community – love, or a concern for ideas?”

• Jesus asks Peter three times. Each time he answers you can feel a rising tension, one that says “what can I do to show you if you don’t believe me?” It isn’t a casual conversation. Do I have this forcefulness in responding to Jesus in my life, or just a casualness?

• Do I allow myself to be dressed by someone else for service to others? Do I go where He leads me? Is my attitude my answer to Jesus’ question: “Follow Me.”?

• What is “my life”? It is not only biological. It is also lifestyle, actions, and identity that come from ego, pride, and self-will. There is something in common though: To “lay down one’s life” has a totality to it. Do I “lay down” my pride, ego, will, wants, and lifestyle for others in my community, or for the “little ones”, the poor or rejected? Is it in totality, or just when it is convenient?

ocarm.org/en/content/lectio/lectio-divina-john-2115-19

evangeli.net/gospel/day/III_65

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Friday of the 7th Week of Easter

  • John 21:15-19
  • Jesus and Peter

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES from Evangeli

2020 Liturgical day: Friday 7th of Easter

«‘Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you’. Jesus then said, ‘Feed my sheep’»

+ Fr. Joaquim MONRÓS i Guitart (Tarragona, Spain)

Today, we should be grateful to St. John for having left with us the evidence of an intimate dialogue between Jesus and Peter: «Simon, son of John, do you love me?», and he said, «Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you». Jesus then said, «Feed my lambs’» (Jn 21:15). —From the smallest ones, newly born to the Grace of God… you must take care, as if you were Myself… When a second time… «Jesus said to him, ‘Look after my sheep’», He is actually telling Simon Peter: —You must guide all those who follow me in my Love, and you must see to it they all have the charity ordained. Thus, through you, everyone will realize they are following Me; for it is my Will you go always first, while administering the merits that —for each one— I have gained.

«Peter was saddened because Jesus asked him a third time, ‘Do you love me?’», and he said, «Lord, you know everything; you know that I love you’» (Jn 21:17). His triple denial makes him rectify, and just remembering it, saddens him. —I truly love you despite I denied you…, you know how much I have regretted my betrayal, you know how much I found consolation by being with your Mother and brothers.

I find consolation in remembering that the Lord established the power to forgive sins that separate us, whether a little or a lot, from his Love and the love to our brothers. —I find consolation when admitting the truth of my distancing from You while feeling from your priestly lips the «I absolve you» “by way of judgment”.

We find consolation in the power of those keys Jesus Christ confers to his priests-ministers, to open again the doors to his friendship. —Lord, I see that indifference can be arranged by a more intense act of love. It makes us altogether evaluate the immense joy of the Sacrament of forgiveness to confess our sins, which are really a “lack of love”.

evangeli.net/gospel/day/III_65

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