Tuesday of the 29th Week of the Year

Luke 12:35-38

Vigilant and Faithful Servants

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES:

Once, when I went home to the province, I found nobody to meet me in the bus terminal late at night. Since our house was not far from the terminal, I took the courage to traverse a dimly-lighted street leading to our house. I found our home dark and our front gate locked.

Everybody was asleep. I had to knock hard at our gate to wake up anybody inside to open up for me. The following day, mu mother informed me that our family driver was told of my arrival, but while waiting for me at the terminal he overslept. I am no master but it would have been a big relief to be met by someone.

The gospel calls for Jesus’ disciples to be vigilant and alert like good servants preparing for the coming of the Son of Man. He compares the coming of the Son of Man to a master who comes home late. He expects his good servant to be ready and to open the door right away.

Like good servants, what preparations have made for the coming of our master and Lord Jesus if ever he arrives today, tomorrow or the next say? It is rather sad if we allow ourselves to “oversleep” and not prepare for his unexpected coming by prayer, service to the poor and the church, and fidelity to the commandments of God.

Remember the young rich man who longed for eternal life; he went home sad, for he was unprepared to leave his wealth and possessions in order to follow Jesus. Thus, Jesus said: “How hard it will be for rich people to enter the Kingdom of God.”

How hard it would be for us then to enter God’s kingdom if we fail to prepare and open our hearts for His arrival at a time we know not. (Fr. Gerry Donato, SVD Bible Diary 2004)

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“Carry no money bag, no sack, no sandals…”

The Lord must have been a radical minimalist to have uttered such words to His disciples in sending them off… or so I thought.

It was during a summer camp exposure in one of the SVD mission in the northern Philippines that this gospel made sense to me. The parish was mountainous and at least a thirty-minute (sometimes four hours) hike was required to move from one barrio to another (make that six hours for a neophyte hiker like me!)

Armed with knapsack of clothes, flashlight, a bottle of water, a small amount of money, radio, etc., I set out from the main parish church to the next barrio for a one-week-four-barrio assignment to help out in meeting the youth and conducting surveys needed by the parish priest.

A few minutes into my first hike and I already realized that much of what I had brought along, I could do without. Thus, in the first barrio, I left behind most of my clothes (regular washing in the river would be most practical), my flashlight (we only traveled by day and we could do with torches), money (with few stores and generous people sharing with us what they had, money was almost useless)…. and the sandals? I still had them on though they sometimes proved to be useless specially when wading into a waist deep river.

Was the Lord a minimalist? I couldn’t say but this I know, the Lord knew what was essential. First, an urgent gospel message of love that was to be the primary concern, not the many accidentals of the journey. Secondly, a companion (he sent them off in pairs). Much of the things I brought I didn’t need but most certainly, I could not have gone anywhere had it not been for my grade six companion-guide who brought me to our destination, and who unknowingly constantly reminded constantly reminded me of what a poor neophyte  me of what a poor neophyte hiker I was. Truly, the Lord knew what he was talking about. (Frt. Anthony Ynzon, SVD Bible Diary 2005)

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Pearl Harbor, the big American Naval Base was a victim of a sneak attack by Japanese planes, December 1941. On the same day, the US Air Force of Clark Field in Pampanga was bombed. Some time ago, a former SVD theology seminarian succumbed to a heart attack. We are familiar with the sudden downpours and flash floods of Manila. Unexpected happenings and the usual unpreparedness on our part stalk our daily life. Something natural in all of us, one may say.

Vigilance and readiness in today’s reading go beyond this world and our earthly life. The Lord will come at any time he wishes. One must be always prepared as his arrival touches on eternal life. To be always prepared means not only now but on the long run also. The early Christians during that time no longer felt that the Lord was soon to come but certainly sooner or later.

The intervening time, however, is crucial for the pilgrim church. The image of the unfaithful and the unwise steward comes to mind. In this world a disciple of Jesus ought to be discreet and prudent, otherwise he is the rich fool of the Bible. He never sees beyond himself, he never sees beyond this world. But the loyal and faithful servant does not take his task lightly. The world attracts and reaches the source of our alienation from God. If we are of God we accept Jesus, our hearts are set upon the heavenly treasure.

The dangers faced by the early Christians appear no less our dangers today. Our manana habit postpones things until it’s too late. There is nothing so fatal as to think we have plenty of time before the master arrives. The lessons of Pearl Harbor and Clark Air Base, the sudden deaths of friends and relatives should lead us to be more vigilant and ready for anytime the Lord “comes and knocks.” (Fr. Antolin Uy, SVD Bible Diary 2008)

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Be prepared: some would even translate this into, Laging handa, which is the famous motto of the Boy Scouts. But this is not an exact translation because lagging handa means “always ready.” Be prepared, on the other hand, is an exhortation. Lagging handa is just the proper response to it.

In today’s gospel, Jesus gives the exhortation and we are expected to give our response. This, of course, is not always ready. Jesus comes to me in different ways, in different forms and different times.  I may not always be alert to His coming and may not recognize Him when he comes. But I always pray that my eyes and heart may have the sense for the presence of God in my life. Today I remember the insight of Linus, or was it Charlie Brown, in Peanuts: “Why do we look for God up there where he is but where we are not, and not rather down here where we are and where he also is?” Remembering this, I pray i meet Jesus in every person and event He chooses to come. (Fr. Roderick Salazar, SVD Bible Diary 2009)

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Weekly Guide for Daily Prayer

Romans 5:12, 15b, 17-19, 20b-21
Psalm 40:7-8a, 8b-9, 10, 17
Luke 12:35-38

Recently, I helped coordinate and celebrate two major gatherings in my extended family – a reunion of my mother’s side of the family and the 65th wedding anniversary of my parents.

So, the emphasis on the importance of the servants’ readiness for the arrival of the head of the household in today’s gospel sparked a bit of anxious memories. Did we plan for enough food? How many guests will come? Would everyone enjoy themselves? Did we forget anything and/or anyone in our planning? What would the weather be like?

Obviously, some of these questions need to be addressed by any host(ess). Yet, in this chapter in Luke’s gospel, the importance on the servants’ readiness is more about ongoing preparedness, rather than getting ready for a special event. It is about an absolute trust in God’s loving goodness and presence. Unlike our attention to detail so as to not forget anything or anyone, this gospel chapter’s larger context sends a message that God is always there for us. We need not get bogged down by the minutiae of life so much as to try to be open to God’s love in our midst. Perhaps this story is not so much about us, as it is about God’s invitation to ‘lighten up’ on ourselves in our day to day worries and to be ever open to God’s presence in our lives.

In the first reading from Romans, we are reminded that we have been gifted with the unbelievable reality that God loves us…even in our frailties and vulnerabilities. From the beginning of time, humans have made mistakes and misjudgments. Yet, though we know that we are all capable of sin, we really need to emphasize the greater truth that God loves us so much that Jesus came to live among us. Through the Pascal mystery of Christ’s life, death and resurrection, we are invited,… no, perhaps we are commanded to focus on God’s healing spirit of forgiveness and love, evidenced through Jesus’ life, words, actions and being God’s living love among us.

Even today’s psalm will not let us forget that God’s wondrous love for us has no bounds. It is God who wants no sacrifice or oblation, no holocaust or sacrifice for sin, but rather for us to open our ears and our hearts to God’s loving kindness. The gift of God among us through the Holy Spirit’s presence is where we really need to focus our attention. All we have to do is say, “Here I am! I have come!”, just as the psalmist does in today’s song of praise.

Perhaps as I re-enter a saner schedule following the whirlwind of family celebrations, I will try to remember today’s message to open my ears, eyes and heart to God’s loving presence…be still and answer, “Here I am.”

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Weekly Guide for Daily Prayer

Romans 5:12, 15b, 17-19, 20b-21
Psalm 40:7-8a, 8b-9, 10, 17
Luke 12:35-38

Recently, I helped coordinate and celebrate two major gatherings in my extended family – a reunion of my mother’s side of the family and the 65th wedding anniversary of my parents.

So, the emphasis on the importance of the servants’ readiness for the arrival of the head of the household in today’s gospel sparked a bit of anxious memories. Did we plan for enough food? How many guests will come? Would everyone enjoy themselves? Did we forget anything and/or anyone in our planning? What would the weather be like?

Obviously, some of these questions need to be addressed by any host(ess). Yet, in this chapter in Luke’s gospel, the importance on the servants’ readiness is more about ongoing preparedness, rather than getting ready for a special event. It is about an absolute trust in God’s loving goodness and presence. Unlike our attention to detail so as to not forget anything or anyone, this gospel chapter’s larger context sends a message that God is always there for us. We need not get bogged down by the minutiae of life so much as to try to be open to God’s love in our midst. Perhaps this story is not so much about us, as it is about God’s invitation to ‘lighten up’ on ourselves in our day to day worries and to be ever open to God’s presence in our lives.

In the first reading from Romans, we are reminded that we have been gifted with the unbelievable reality that God loves us…even in our frailties and vulnerabilities. From the beginning of time, humans have made mistakes and misjudgments. Yet, though we know that we are all capable of sin, we really need to emphasize the greater truth that God loves us so much that Jesus came to live among us. Through the Pascal mystery of Christ’s life, death and resurrection, we are invited,… no, perhaps we are commanded to focus on God’s healing spirit of forgiveness and love, evidenced through Jesus’ life, words, actions and being God’s living love among us.

Even today’s psalm will not let us forget that God’s wondrous love for us has no bounds. It is God who wants no sacrifice or oblation, no holocaust or sacrifice for sin, but rather for us to open our ears and our hearts to God’s loving kindness. The gift of God among us through the Holy Spirit’s presence is where we really need to focus our attention. All we have to do is say, “Here I am! I have come!”, just as the psalmist does in today’s song of praise.

Perhaps as I re-enter a saner schedule following the whirlwind of family celebrations, I will try to remember today’s message to open my ears, eyes and heart to God’s loving presence…be still and answer, “Here I am.”

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October 23, 2012

St. John of Capistrano, priest

(OptM) WHITE

Tuesday of the 29th Week

GREEN

Eph 2:12-22

Ps 85

Lk 12:35-38

Lk 12:35-38

Vigilant and Faithful Servants

[Jesus said to his disciples,] 35 “Gird your loins and light your lamps 36and be like servants who await their master’s return from a wedding, ready to open immediately when he comes and knocks. 37Blessed are those servants whom the master finds vigilant on his arrival. Amen, I say to you, he will gird himself, have them recline at table, and proceed to wait on them. 38And should he come in the second or third watch and find them prepared in this way, blessed are those servants.”

REFLECTION: Gird your loins and light your lamps. No one can tell when the end time will occur or when God will call us back to himself. Hence, we have to be vigilant. How?

First, gird your loins. In ancient times, servants have an outer garment that is gathered up to the waist so that they can work unencumbered. The expression connotes readiness for continued and strenuous activities. God must find us working, completing our tasks and fulfilling our responsibilities. God must find us working for the good of others.

Second, light your lamps. Lighted lamps are meant to guide, show the way, and overcome darkness. They are ready to be of use. God must find us at the service of others. We use our time, talents, and treasure for the benefit of our fellow men and women. We must guide people, show them the right way, and make steps to conquer the darkness of sin, personal or societal. God must find us working for the salvation of his people.

Can you consider your life a service to others? How do you guide other people to the right way of Christ?

ssp.ph/index.php/online-resources/366-days-with-the-lord/2012-october-23-2012

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Monday, October 19, 2015

TUESDAY OF THE 29TH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME (YEAR B) – LUKAS 12:35-38. UNSA MAY ANGAY NATONG BUHATON ISIP MGA PINIYALAN SA DIOS? Duha ka butang ang gisugyot sa ebanghelyo. Una, si Hesus miingon, “Ibakos ang inyong bisti”. Ang mga sulugoon panahon sa Bibliya tag-as og sinina. Ang ilang hawakan kinahanglang ibakos aron sila makalihok ug makatrabaho. Sa pag-ingon ni Hesus “ibakos ang inyong bisti”, buot niyang dasigon ang mga tinun-an nga mag-andam kanunay sa kaugalingon alang sa pagpangalagad. Ug ikaduha, si Hesus miingon, “Pasigaa ang inyong lampara”. Ang nagsiga nga lampara maoy gamiton sa pagbuntog sa kangitngit ug paglamdag sa dalan. Sa pagsugo ni Hesus “pasigaa ang inyong lampara” buot niyang hagiton ang mga tinun-an sa pagpakigbatok sa mga daotan ug paghatag og mga maayong panig-ingnan. Posted by Abet Uy

abetuy.blogspot.com/2015/10/tuesday-of-29th-week-in-ordinary-time.html

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See Today’s Readings:  Year I,   Year II

Back to: Tuesday of the 29th Week of the Year

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