Thursday of the 23rd Week of the Year

Luke 6:27-38

Love of Enemies

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES:

Today, in the gospel, Jesus exhorts us to listen, to love our enemies, to do good to those who hate us, to bless those who curse, to pray for those who abuse us…

Why should we do all that? Are these not contrary to our nature? Jesus teaches us to be merciful just as the Father is merciful. God shows us that when we forgive others we also forgive ourselves. Isn’t this what is meant by our being given in “good measure, pressed down, shaken together, running over?”

“Lord, our God, thank you for the encounter we have with your word today. Help us to see you and the way we must follow you in mercy and love. Lead us in your divine will for in you alone is true security, joy and life. Change us that we may truly build your kingdom. Amen.” (Sr. Lourdes Felipe, SSpS Bible Diary 2002)

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A trapped rattlesnake can become so angry that it will bite itself. That’s exactly what we do to ourselves when we let anger and bitterness, hatred and resentment get the better of us. We end up biting (inflicting pain on) ourselves, not our enemy. The truth is we are harming ourselves more than we are harming our enemies.

There was a lady who came to talk to me about her philandering husband, how angry she was with him that she would literally kill him the moment she sees him. She was just consumed with anger and hatred that she wanted to blot him out of the face of the earth – instantly!

Because of this obsession, she doesn’t have any peace of mind, she is always edgy because of sleepless nights. Naturally, she feels sick – hypertension, too much stress and heart palpitation and what have you.

Doctors nowadays tell us that many of their patients are victims of their own anger and resentment. They are sick because they are obsessed with anger, bitterness and hatred. The best medicine they could take would be to follow Jesus’ teaching: “Love your enemies…do good actions to those who hate you….and pray for those who mistreat you.”

How do we deal with anger and resentment: are we controlling them or are they consuming us? Remember, when we forgive our enemies, we let the prisoner free – ourselves! (Fr. Fred Mislang, SVD Bible Diary 2007)

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We are told we must destroy the terrorists. Why is it that the world seems to be always divided? When I was a child during World War II, the enemies were the Japanese and Nazis. Then the communists became the enemy to be hated and conquered. Now the enemies are the terrorists, Moslem extremists, Bin Laden, Al Qaeda and anyone who disagrees with us.

But what does Jesus say? “Love your enemies. Do good to those who hate you. Pray for those who mistreat you?” do we ever pray for these global enemies?  And what about the “enemies” closer to home, those who annoy us or had offended or hurt us? Most people react to others the way others deal with them. If someone smiles at me or greets me, I automatically return the smile or greeting. If someone snubs or ignores me or even says an offensive word to me, I tend to do the same to them. That is the natural reaction. We do to others what they do to us. That is why there are so many conflicts.

Jesus gave what is like a magic formula, the Golden rule: “Do to others as you would have them do to you.” God does good to all, the good and bad alike. He warns us not to take revenge, not to get even, not to judge or condemn others.

Mother Angelica suggested: “We should not worry about getting even in this life. Death is the great equalizer.” (Fr. Jim Risse, SVD Bible Diary 2008)

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The story is told about a widow whose husband was about to be buried. When the casket was being carried out of the house, it hit the door, and the husband came back to life! Some years later, the husband died again, and as the casket was being carried out of the house, the widow pleaded with the pall bearers: Slowly please, do not bump the door again!”

There are two irritating and bothersome attitudes that keep on “resurrecting” in our Christian life – our being unforgiving and our being judgmental. Try as we might, a little bump could usually trigger our anger and pride and make us backslide in our spiritual journey. Whenever anger is “resurrected” we must become aware of it, and in surrender, pray again that most powerful prayer: “Come, Holy Spirit!” Whenever we are tempted to be judgmental, calculating or condescending we must pray St. Francis’ Prayer: “Lord, make me an instrument of your peace…”

Allow me to share this beautiful text message I received which should remind us to be forgiving and compassionate: “To be tender with the young; to be compassionate with the aged; to be sympathetic with the striving; to be patient with the weak; to be forgiving of sinners….for in our lifetime, we were, and will be any or of all of these.”

In humility, let us ask the Lord to give us forgiving hearts for we ourselves have been forgiven much. In humility, we ask also the Lord to remove our judgmental and condemning hearts and give us understanding and compassionate hearts. (Fr. Jerry Orbos, SVD Bible Diary 2009)

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PRAY THEN ACT. A few ago, I was host to a garden party in the Cardinal’s house where the families of the Cardinal’s benefactors were gathered and thanked. It was supposed to be a familiar gathering. Written invitations were sent out, including the names of the children. It so happened the typist made the mistake of sending an invitation to a family, naming only one child. Carla, to whom I gave First Communion last year, was not indicated in the envelope. She saw the envelope and said to herself that she was not coming. So when the parents and the elder brother came, I asked, “Where is Carla?” the mother said, “Father, you forgot to put her name in the envelope.” So wanting to ease her ill-feeling, I went to the telephone and I told her, “Carla, you are included in the invitation, please come over.” She said to me over the telephone, “”I am not coming, Father. I already prayed to God to send to send down rain tonight.” She sounded so sure that her prayers will be answered. I  could feel the simple pain of a child through the air waves and vibrations over the telephone. She was so sure the party would be spoiled with the rain that she had asked God to bring down on the party.

We pray but for what do we pray and with what do we pray? Jesus prayed also. That was the opening sentence of the gospel. What did he prayed for? I don’t know but from the succeeding sentences you can conclude that He prayed for discernment. He prayed for wisdom to be able to make the right decision. He also acted on the prayer. Acting on our prayers is something most of us neglect to do. We must first pray and then act. Jesus prayed and sought the will of the Father and then later acted on it. What happens most often with us is that we act and seeing the mistakes, we start praying so that the harm will be controlled.

Pray and then act. On the other hand, there are some of us who pray a lot for discernment but we don’t act at all. We just keep praying. I beg the Lord for us to have those two graces. First, to put prayer before any activity. Second, to put action after every prayer. (Bp. Soc Villegas Love Like Jesus p. 24)

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“You have enemies? Good,” says Winston Churchill. “That means you’ve stood up for something, sometime in your life.” All of us have enemies. As the great Tagalog Filipino poet writes: Sa paligid ay maraming/mga kaaway na lihim (The surrounding is full/of secret enemies).

Even Jesus has enemies (Luke 19:27, Phil 3:18). Jesus does not then command His disciples not to have enemies, but what to do when they have enemies. That is, “Love your enemies.” In this gospel reading, he gives three applications of love for enemies (vv. 29-30):

1)      Turn the other cheek. Striking a person on the cheek is a form of insult as it is today. An insult is sampal sa mukha (a slap on the face). To shame Him, the soldiers slap the face of Jesus (John 18:22). Turning the other cheek then is a dramatic and physical sign of non-retaliation that breaks the cycle of violence.

2)      Do not withhold your shirt. At that time, people usually wear two pieces of clothing, an undergarment and an out garment. The outer garment is multi-purpose: to indicate one’s social status, to cover the head, to use as a blanket at night, to carry kneading bowls and to serve as a pledge or collateral for one’s debts (Ex. 22:25-24). In this gospel reading, loving one’s enemies is readiness to pay one’s debts by not withholding one’s outer garment. That’s a practical wisdom especially to those who have bunch of enemies because they don’t pay their debts.

3)      Give to the one who asks of you. Those who ask are the poor, the beggars in particular. Loving enemies means then loving the beggars. During that time (even today), beggars are considered practically as “enemies” because they are outside the circles of community and friendship.

This recalls an old story about St. Lawrence the Deacon. He was the treasurer of the Church of Rome in the 3rd century AD. The Roman authorities, thinking that the Church was wealthy, commanded Lawrence to bring to them the treasures of the Church. After three days Lawrence returned. “Where is the treasure?” the Romans demanded. Lawrence led them to the entrance of the hall and threw open the great doors leading to the courtyard. Outside was assembled a great crowd of poor, beggars, blind and crippled humanity. “Behold, the treasure of the Church,” said Lawrence. (Fr. Randold Flores, SVD “7th Sunday in Ordinary Time Year A”Bible Diary 2007

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The story is told about a widow whose husband was about to be buried. When the casket was being carried out of the house, it hit the door, and the husband came back to life! Some years later, the husband died again, and as the casket was being carried out of the house, the widow pleaded with the pall bearers: Slowly please, do not bump the door again!”

There are two irritating and bothersome attitudes that keep on “resurrecting” in our Christian life – our being unforgiving and our being judgmental. Try as we might, a little bump could usually trigger our anger and pride and make us backslide in our spiritual journey. Whenever anger is “resurrected” we must become aware of it, and in surrender, pray again that most powerful prayer: “Come, Holy Spirit!” Whenever we are tempted to be judgmental, calculating or condescending we must pray St. Francis’ Prayer: “Lord, make me an instrument of your peace…”Allow me to share this beautiful text message I received which should remind us to be forgiving and compassionate: “To be tender with the young; to be compassionate with the aged; to be sympathetic with the striving; to be patient with the weak; to be forgiving of sinners….for in our lifetime, we were, and will be any or of all of these.”

In humility, let us ask the Lord to give us forgiving hearts for we ourselves have been forgiven much. In humility, we ask also the Lord to remove our judgmental and condemning hearts and give us understanding and compassionate hearts. (Fr. Jerry Orbos, SVD Bible Diary 2009)

 

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What I personally find most enlightening in the word of Jesus in today’s gospel is this: beyond and behind the practical and down-to-earth examples that he cited, we reflect some traits that go with real Christian love.

  • Love, in the words of Pope John XXIII, foregoes a lot. “Do good to those who hate you; bless those who curse you; pray for those who maltreat you.”
  • Love, in the words of Paul the Apostle is generous. “When someone slaps you on one cheek, turn and give him the other….Give to all who beg from you. When a man takes what is yours, do not demand it back….”
  • Love, in the words of John of the Cross, is without measure. “Love your enemy and do good; lend without expecting repayment…”
  • Love is always viewing things from the point of personal relationship. “Be compassionate…do not judge… For the measure you measure with will be measured back to you.” (Fr. Domie Guzman SSP New Every Morning New Everyday p. 274)

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September 13, 2012

St. John Chrysostom, bishop and doctor (M)
WHITE

1 Cor 8:1b-7, 11-13
Ps 139
Lk 6:27-38

Lk 6:27-38
Love of Enemies
[Jesus said to his disciples,] 27“But to you who hear I say, love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, 28bless those who curse you, pray for those who mistreat you. 29To the person who strikes you on one cheek, offer the other one as well, and from the person who takes your cloak, do not withhold even your tunic. 30Give to everyone who asks of you, and from the one who takes what is yours do not demand it back. 31Do to others as you would have them do to you. 32For if you love those who love you, what credit is that to you? Even sinners love those who love them. 33And if you do good to those who do good to you, what credit is that to you? Even sinners do the same. 34If you lend money to those from whom you expect repayment, what credit [is] that to you? Even sinners lend to sinners, and get back the same amount. 35But rather, love your enemies and do good to them, and lend expecting nothing back; then your reward will be great and you will be children of the Most High, for he himself is kind to the ungrateful and the wicked. 36Be merciful, just as [also] your Father is merciful.

37“Stop judging and you will not be judged. Stop condemning and you will not be condemned. Forgive and you will be forgiven. 38Give and gifts will be given to you; a good measure, packed together, shaken down, and overflowing, will be poured into your lap. For the measure with which you measure will in return be measured out to you.”

REFLECTION
Love your enemies. The Gospel tells us to examine how much we love or how we love, for that matter. We are called to love God. Love for God is manifested by the way we love our neighbors. How? Jesus tells us “to do good.” This means that we must not be selective in doing good. We must not be choosy whom we have to help, to pray for, to take care of. No matter what a person does to us, no matter if he hurts or insults us, we must continue to accept, understand, or forgive that person. Our love must assume a Christian character: not in feeling good but in doing good to others no matter what. Like what Jesus preaches and does, our love must be compassionate, unconditional, limitless, healing, and forgiving.

Can you claim that you can love your enemies and forgive them?
How do you feel when somebody forgives you?

ssp.ph/index.php/online-resources/366-days-with-the-lord/1991-september-13-2012

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V. 27: It’s a human tendency to show kindness and love only to those who are also good and kind to us. the burden of Christianity lies in this teaching of Jesus: love unconditionally. Go beyond the human tendency. show the same love, friend or enemy. (Fr. Ching OP)

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THURSDAY OF THE 23RD WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME (YEAR A) LUKAS 6:27-38. – Unsaon man nato paghigugma ang atong kaaway? Ang una natong buhaton mao ang paghatag og pasaylo. Himoon nato kini bisan kon ang atong kaaway wala mangayo niini. Diha sa atong kasingkasing ato siyang pasayloon sa daotan nga iyang nahimo. Gawas niini, mag-ampo kita alang sa iyang kaayohan, dili kaparotan. Atong sundogon si Hesus nga didto sa krus nag-ampo alang sa kaluwasan sa mga nagpasakit kaniya: “Amahan ko, pasayloa sila kay wala sila masayod sa ilang gibuhat”. Ang paghigugma sa kaaway dili sayon nga buhaton. Apan gisugo kini ni Hesus tungod kay kini makaayo dili lang sa kaaway kondili kanato mismo. Sa pagpasaylo sa kaaway, kita usab mapasaylo sa Dios. Ug sa pag-ampo alang sa kaaway, malibre nato ang atong kasingkasing sa kasuko ug pagdumot, ug sa ingon, maato ang kalinaw ug kalipay. Posted by Abet Uy

abetuy.blogspot.com/2014/09/thursday-of-23rd-week-in-ordinary-time.html

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Reflection for Thursday September 11, Twenty-third Week in Ordinary Time; Luke 6:27-38 Reflection: All of us will agree that we can easily love those who give us love in return. But are we willing to love those who’ve hurt us or those who continue on hurting us? Mother Teresa once said: “If you love until it hurts, there can be no more hurt, only more love.” A wife or a husband who truly love will continue to love his/her spouse notwithstanding the betrayal/s.

Many marriages fail because we put limits on how we give love. For example if a wife discovers that her husband is playing around with fire. The reaction of the wife is perhaps to take revenge and play with fire also and not to anymore love her philandering husband. But what will happen if we are like this? There would be many broken marriages, there would be many suffering children simply because we put limits on how we give our love.

Jesus in our gospel is advising us to change this mindset of reactive love. To bring our understanding of love to a much higher level; perhaps (If we can) to the level of God’s love for us.  But are we capable of raising to a higher level our understanding of love and on how we give love?

If we truly love Jesus we would be able to forgive and once again love a spouse who betrayed us. We would be able to love our siblings/relatives who’ve hurt us and who don’t want to listen to our well meaning advice/s. We would be able to love a friend who betrayed our trust.

Jesus tells us in the gospel:  For if you love those who love you, what credit is that to you? Even sinners love those who love them. And if you do good to those who do good to you, what credit is that to you? Even sinners do the same (Luke 6:32-33).

How do you love? – Marino J. Dasmarinas

mjdasma.blogspot.com/2014/09/reflection-for-thursday-september-11_9.html

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THE FIGHTER: “Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who mistreat you.” – Luke 6:27-28

Fighter. That’s what I was in my old life.

And yes I’ve seen and have been to many fights during my violent fraternity days. You’d think I was tough, right? Wrong!

Because none of those fights changed my life for the better. No matter how many bruises and how much battering my body received, it didn’t pacify the rebellion I had inside. The more I hated and the more evil I became!

It’s true, no one wins in a war.

That’s why Proverbs 16:32 says, “Better a patient man than a warrior, a man who has self-control than one who takes a city.”

The real fighter wins over himself. Then he can surround his opponents with a bigger circle of love, forgiveness and acceptance. To totally annihilate an enemy is to make him a friend.

Today is the day that you move from the environment of hatred into a life of grace.

Today let’s declare, “We’re no longer victims but victors!”

Let our new battlecry be, “By God’s grace, I am victorious!

I love, I forgive, I move on! I am God’s Powerful Champion!” Obet Cabrillas (kpreacherobet@gmail.com)

Reflection: The battle isn’t yours alone. If it is, you’ll be a loser. The battle is the Lord’s! Be on the winning side!

Lord, remind me that You fight with me in the battles I face. Amen.

kerygmafamily.com/modules/dailyreadings/read.php?date=2014-09-11

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GOING THE EXTRA MILE – I wonder how Jesus’ listeners reacted to His words in today’s Gospel passage. Did they turn around and go away, saying, “That’s too much”?

While most of the Ten Commandments begin with “Thou shall not,” Jesus gives us here a list of “Thou shall do.” And that makes it so difficult to practice what Jesus teaches here. It is easier to refrain from doing something bad than doing something extra. It is easier to avoid something not so good than going out of one’s way to do more than what was expected. The extra mile is a challenge that can make or break a Christian. I might say that I am as good a Christian as my neighbors, but Jesus challenges us to be better Christians than our neighbors. This is not to brag or to become proud, but to become more Christ-like. After all, Christ really went the extra mile.

Jesus did the extra mile when He stood up from the Last Supper and washed the feet of His disciples. And in line with today’s Gospel passage, Jesus explained to His shocked disciples, “I have given you a model to follow, so that as I have done for you, you should also do” (John 13:15).

Many see Christianity as a religion of prohibitions. But no! Christianity is a religion of “dos” rather than “don’ts.” Christianity is a religion of the positive rather than the negative. If only we would understand this, our religion could become more a source of joy and happiness. Having done something positive, something extra, and seeing the effect on the recipient of our good deed, there is joy.

I still have a photo from last year’s Easter Monday newspaper, which showed Pope Francis “taking a bath” in the crowd at St. Peter’s Square. He waved and smiled, kissed babies, and embraced a sick youth. He did not have to do this, but he went the extra mile.

Mission impossible? No! We only need to overcome our laziness and selfishness to reach out and bring joy to others by going the extra mile. Fr. Rudy Horst, SVD

REFLECTION QUESTIONS: Are you reluctant to do something extra for others? What hinders you from imitating Christ’s going the extra mile?

Lord, Your words seem demanding, but Your example is inspiring. Help me to reach out. Help me to do something extra for others and so bring joy to them.

kerygmafamily.com/modules/dailyreadings/read.php?date=2014-09-11

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CRAZY LOVER – “Love your enemies, do good to those who hate you, bless those who curse you, pray for those who mistreat you.’” – Luke 6:27

When you think about the verse above, you’d think God must be slightly crazy when He said this. First, He asks us to do good (not too hard there), then He tells us to forgive our enemies (a hard act in itself). But wait, there’s more. He goes beyond all this by saying, “Love your enemies.”

Think about it. As if liking an enemy wasn’t hard enough, He then asks us to love them?! Insane!

Personally, it was hard for me to do this. I felt like it was an impossible endeavor. But when I slowly came to know Jesus in a deeper way, I learned to forgive those who hated me, cursed me and abused me. Surprisingly, I felt lighter, joyful and more loved. I found it easier to forgive as I drew closer to Him.

This made me realize that forgiveness was, after all, not so much about forgiving the enemy. It was more about healing the forgiver. Erika Mendoza (epaulmendoza@gmail.com)

Reflection: “The weak can never forgive. Forgiveness is the attribute of the strong.” (Mahatma Gandhi)

Lord, thank You for Your forgiveness. Help me to forgive quickly every day.

kerygmafamily.com/modules/dailyreadings/read.php?date=2015-09-10

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CHOOSING THE PATH OF LOVE – One of the greatest dangers we face is to fail to take responsibility for the choices and opportunities we make. Many people go through life blaming others for their problems, never asking themselves what they are going to do to change their circumstances. Life passes them by because they never embrace it and throw themselves into it. They are not interested in making something of life; they want it delivered to them on a platter.

In today’s reading, Paul encourages us to make choices — to choose to put on love in relating with one another, to choose to take control of our lives (under the guidance of God’s grace, of course), and to live it reflecting the values and truths we believe in passionately. This is what life is all about — making the most of our situations and not waiting for the perfect opportunity before we make a move.

Jesus encountered all sorts of adversity in His life. The saints dealt with struggles and trials but did they let the difficulties define who they were? No. By the grace of God, they rose above their difficulties and embraced the possibilities that are always out there waiting to be grasped.

Paul lists a number of qualities for our relational lives: compassion, meekness, patience, and so on. It requires work as well as choices to make life happen. If we want to experience the fullness of life that God offers us, we have to work hard at it. Then we will see the grace of God at work in our lives. It is this experience that adds so much to our lives and strengthens us to persevere through our difficulties. It all boils down to the choices we make. Fr. Steve Tynan, MGL

REFLECTION QUESTIONS: Do you wait for things to happen in your life? Do you have a dream and pursue it relentlessly, making the most of life no matter what happens to you?

Jesus, thank You for Your grace at work in my life. Help me to embrace it fully, such that in everything I do, I will be able to draw from the storehouse of Your love and mercy.

kerygmafamily.com/modules/dailyreadings/read.php?date=2015-09-10

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September 10, 2015

Thursday of the 23rd Week in the Ordinary Time

Col 3: 12-17, Lk 6: 27-38

Acceptance of differences and diversity means to reduce enmity and hatred

One of the prominent reasons for fight between two groups or war between two countries is the human tendency to take revenge or retaliate. Jesus’ advice to his disciples to forgive enemies is very significant in this context. Jesus goes one step further and asks his disciples to love their enemies. Many of us may ask how one can love his enemies. According to Jesus the disciples of Jesus are expected to reach a higher spiritual level than the ordinary people.

Entertaining hurt feeling or enmity towards other person or persons will ultimately hurt oneself. We will not be able to focus on our tasks or do any creative work when we entertain hurt feelings or enmity. Therefore getting rid of the hurt feelings or ill feelings is needed for our own psychological well being.

We can recall the examples of persons, who could forgive their enemies and get inspiration from them. A few examples are Mahatma Gandhi, Gladys Steins, the widow of Graham stein who was burnt alive along with his two sons in Odisha and the parents of Sr. Rani Maria who was brutally murdered in a rural area of Indore diocese in Madhya Pradesh.

Forgiving ones enemies and loving them is possible only with God’s grace. Hence prayer is an important means. It is through prayer that we get the power and strength to forgive others. Yoga meditation is another means to make us calm down.

Some political parties in India have adopted for political mobilization a strategy of depicting particular religious minorities as enemies of the nation and spreading falsehood and hatred against them. This kind of political mobilization strategy divides the society and the nation and leads to frequent communal flare ups. The disciples of Jesus should not keep silent when such falsehood is spread. They have to make use of all means available to build understanding and harmony among the different communities.

There is also need for educating people, especially the students and youth that taking revenge is not a solution. It can lead only to a spiral of violence. In the context of increasing sectarian violence in the society, there is need for educating the people about the non-violent means for resolving conflicts. Fr. Jacob Peenikaprambil CMI

navchetana.com/web/homilies.php?date=2015-09-10

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A Most High Ideal

September 10, 2015 (readings)

Thursday of the Twenty-third Week in Ordinary Time

Father Patrick Butler, LC

Luke 6: 27-38

Introductory Prayer: God the Father, thank you for the gift of creation, including my own life. God the Son, thank you for redeeming me at the price of your own Body and Blood. God the Holy Spirit, thank you for being the sweet guest of my soul, enlightening my mind, strengthening my spirit and kindling the fire of your love in my heart.

Petition: Lord Jesus, help me to actively seek the perfection you desire for me.

  1. Revolution or Civil War?The values that Jesus proposes in his sermon on the mountain might be termed “revolutionary.” Never had the ideal of love been placed so high, demanding such heroism in practice. That’s why what Jesus asks provokes a struggle within me, between the “old man,” who resists this message, and the ideals my Lord places before me. This might be termed a “civil war” played out on the battlefield of my heart.
  2. The Golden Rule:Jesus gives me what has been termed the “Golden Rule”: do to others as you would have them do to you. Since I naturally love myself to the point of desiring all good things and nothing bad to come my way, Jesus exhorts me to transfer that benevolence to others. This requires an effort for me, since I tend towards egoism. What can lift me up out of my smallness, my narrowness?
  3. Becoming like God:God’s plan for me is marvelous. It exceeds my comprehension to hear Jesus tell me to be perfect, not according to a standard of human perfection, but according to divine perfection. My vocation is to become like God – for his divine life to increase in me and for my narrow, egoistic standards to diminish and disappear. I would not strive for such a high goal, if it were not commanded by my Lord. I must trust that he can do it in me. What I have to do is to collaborate with him, seeking him in prayer and discerning his will for me always.

Conversation with Christ: I thank you, Lord Jesus, for wanting to transform me into a greater likeness of God. Without you, this is impossible. With you, everything is possible, even in me with all my weaknesses and limitations. Your will be done!

Resolution: I will transform my way of judging from my point of view to God’s. Today I will strive to put into practice the “Golden Rule”.

epriest.com/reflections/view/508

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Today’s Readings:  Year I,   Year II

Back to:  Thursday of the 23rd Week of the Year

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