Monday of the 9th Week of the Year

Mk 12:1-12

Parable of the Tenants

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES:

The parable is so full of truths that we can note them only in the shortest way. It tells us certain things about God.

It tells us of the generosity of God. The vineyard was equipped with everything that was necessary to make the work of the cultivators easy and profitable. God is generous in the life and in the world that He gives to us.

It tells us of the trust of God. The owner went away and left the cultivators to run the vineyard themselves. God trusts us enough to give us freedom to run life as we choose. And as someone said: “The lovely thing about God is that He allows us to do so much for ourselves.”

It tells us of the patience of God. Not once or twice but many times the master gave the cultivators the opportunity to pay the debt they owed. He treated them with patience they little deserved.

It tells us of the ultimate triumph of the justice of God. Men and women might take advantage of the patience of God, but in the end comes judgment and justice. God may bear long with disobedience and rebellion but in the end He acts. (Fr. Louie Punzalan, SVD Bible Diary 2002)

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The point of the parable of the tenants in the vineyards is the refusal of those charged with the care of the vineyard to respect the authority of those who represent the owner, even and most especially the authority of the son. Jesus directed the parable to the religious leaders of his time who adamantly refused to believe in him as the Son of God and rejected the message of salvation he was offering.

The experience of rejection is not unknown to Jesus. This can be our consolation in moments when we feel most rejected, even humiliated. We don’t have to suffer rejection like Jesus that ultimately led to his death. Yet, out of deep love for His Father and for us, Jesus went beyond. Agonizing on the cross, among his last words were: “Father, forgive them for they know not what they do.” in the end, as in the parable, God vindicated His Son. God’s ultimate triumph happened on the cross. With Jesus’ death came His resurrection! “The stone which the builders rejected has become the cornerstone…”

In Jesus’ triumph on the cross lies our strength, our hope. We too can overcome. “No pain is so deep that God is not deeper still.” (Sr. Carmelita, SSpS Bible Diary 2005)

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In the beginning the Pharisees had been exemplary Jews. Zealously they upheld the Law of Moses in the time of Maccabees when rulers of other nations had been determined to root out the Jewish religion and make the Jewish people conform to the customs of those who worshipped false gods. But then after the time of persecutions they had become self-complacent; they turned into an elite group. No criticism of their way of life could be tolerated. Inside, they gave way to their greed and lust, but outwardly they still paraded as pious persons. People who spoke out and exposed them, namely, the prophets, were salvaged. They preferred to kill the prophets and thus silence them than to look into themselves and correct their ways.

The above is a historical rendition of today’s parable. The Pharisees are the tenants who have delusions of grandeur and self-importance; the messengers sent by God, the landowner, are the prophets; the son is Christ who suffered the same fate as the prophets.

From a different angle, this parable can also be re-titled the Parable of Missed Opportunities. The Pharisees and Jewish religious leaders in general, failed to respond to the messages of God in the persons of the prophets and finally His Son. They failed to seized the opportunities, those grace-filled moments of God’s invitation and visitation. Instead they became opportunists who sought to grab and hold to power. Worse, they cut down any threat against them; they “tried to arrest Him because they know that He told this parable against them. But they were afraid because of the crowds, so they went away and left Him.” (Fr. Stan Plutz, SVD Bible Diary 2006)

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“A man planted sugarcanes in his vast field. To do so, he gathered all the poor and the unemployed, including children, in the surrounding area and offered them work for a pittance and under subhuman conditions.

“In due time, a father of eleven children approached the owner to ask for a little more share from the abundant harvest. But the bodyguards of the seized the farmer, struck him and sent him back empty-handed. Another worker came to ask for money for hospitalization. They also struck him on the head and treated him shamefully. The workers started organizing themselves, so that they could together clamor for a just wage and a more human condition in their work. But one member disappeared and another was salvaged. In the same way the owner and his cohort treated many other workers; some they struck and others they killed. And so last of all of the workers sent their women and children for they said, ‘they will respect women and children.’

“But the owner and his bodyguards said to one another, ‘What shall we do? Let’s release the dogs when they come!’

“And so it happened that in desperation many workers joined the NPA and took up arms against the ungodly owner. Since then neither the owner nor the guerillas found rest in their lives, families and works.”

This parable and that of the gospel today tell us the following:

1.    Justice is necessary condition for peace and well-being.

2.    Greed (of the vineyard tenants and the sugarcane owner) promotes injustice and violence.

3.    Greed, injustice and violence belong to the reign of darkness which must be banished by the light of the Word who is Jesus.

4.    Our task as Christians is to promote justice in our relationship with God, with ourselves and with others. (Fr. Atilano Corcuera, SVD Bible Diary 2007)

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It is a very pleasant experience to spend harvest time with the farmers of Mindanao. The whole family and neighbors are involved. But how pitiful the situation turns out for many of them when all the work is done? Paying debts and loans will swallow most of their earnings. Against this background Jesus’ parable seems to me the reverse. If we let the farmers of Mindanao tell their story, it is the tenant who is being exploited and the financier the one not giving the right share at the right time. It was not like that with the leaders of Israel in Jesus’ time. They were the tenants of God’s vineyard. Service turned into exploitation and abuse; responsibility was replaced by privileges; solidarity with the poor and marginalized was substituted by purity rituals and laws; obedience to the divine will was put aside and the power of the religious system got control over God. Whenever we meet people representing this system of oppression, privileges, laws again human dignity and power beyond measure, we know that they are ready to get rid of God instead of serving others. let’s not allow ourselves to become like these tenants, otherwise, we might run the risk of rejecting and oppressing others while trying to own what is not ours. (Fr. Marcelo Cattaneo, SVD Bible Diary 2008)

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May 30, 2016 Monday

This parable can make one easily say of the tenants, “What a bunch of greedy ingrates!” It is difficult to learn and accept the lesson that Jesus Christ, the Word-made- flesh and God-with-us, wants to impart. It takes humility to recognize a favor and say, “Thank you for helping me out.”

Today, I ask, “Has God not given me a vineyard of gifts: intelligence, talents, loving family and friends, associates, even total strangers at times and situations, all bearers of blessings in my life? I give myself now, the opportunity to examine this vineyard and how my all-loving Creator God has carefully “put a fence around it, dug a hole for the winepress and built a watch tower” to protect it.

I remember how my widowed mother, despite her meager means, decided to transfer my sister and me from the public school in our small barrio to the Holy Ghost School run by the MissionaryS isters Servants of the Holy Spirit (SSPS) in Tayum, Abra where I eventually received my college diploma. Afterwards, I had big dreams of making it good in the USA or Canada and was ready to fly. Missionary service, I thought, could wait a while, perhaps three years or more. Thankfully, my mother’s friend, a sincere and courageous SSPS sister, took me to task, saying, “You are not going to make God wait!” The rest is history.

Prayer: Dear God, thank you for Your power within me enabling me to recognize Your unending grace without which I cannot overcome my selfish desires and weaknesses. Make me constantly aware that You are the Giver and Owner of all that I am. Grant me a thankful and generous heart, ready to serve and to share your gifts with others in love. Amen. (Fr. Ancille Elveña, SSpS | Manila Bible Diary 2016)

rveritas-asia.org/daily-reflection/663-may-30-2016-monday

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Today’s first reading (2 Pt 1:2-7) gives us a description of the road to heaven.  What are the steps that move us forward on the journey of holiness?

1. The first step is faith. You took that step when you decided to believe in Christ and make him the center of your life

2. Then, faith moves us forward into virtue. The “Catechism of the Catholic Church” (para.1804) defines virtue as “firm attitudes, stable dispositions, habitual perfections of intellect and will that govern our actions, order our passions, and guide our conduct according to reason and faith.” When we have faith in God, we desire to increase our goodness because it pleases him and draws us nearer to him.

3. Virtue moves us into discernment. If we prefer to keep one foot on  the path to heaven and one foot in the world, we don’t spend enough time discerning what is holy and what’s not. But if we prefer to have the virtues of heaven, the difference between good and evil become obvious.  And because we desire please God, we ask the Holy Spirit for wisdom and guidance.

4. Discernment advances us into self-control. Signs that we do not have  self-control are: frequently losing our temper; being continually fearful; jumping to conclusions; procrastination; schedules that are so busy they wear us out and leave us little time for spiritual matters and healthy relationships; letting others control our moods by their  hurtfulness or demands or disapproval; addictions of any sort, and losing track  of our goals and dreams. When we discern what’s at the root of our  anger or fear or additions, etc., we gain control over it. Then we’re faced with a decision, the 5th step:

5. Self-control moves us into piety (holiness). When we control our  knee-jerk reactions to the sins and frustrations around us, or to the temptations that are pulling us, and we choose instead to get down on our knees in humble discernment, we become free to act as Jesus would, and the Holy Spirit empowers us to succeed.

6. Piety moves us into caring about others. By choosing to imitate Christ, we unite ourselves to his perfect love. Without this, we’re driven into selfishness in order to fill in the gaps where love has been missing. With it, we find the right balance between letting Jesus meet our needs and letting Jesus meet the needs of others through us.

7. Caring for others moves us into perfect (100%) love. We become  Jesus’ hands and feet and warm embrace. We become so strong in our desire to be united to God who is Love that we make sacrifices for others like he did. There is no greater love than to lay down our lives daily as an example of what Christ’s saving love is really like.

God trusts us

A number of persons say that they are disturbed. They say that there is the absence of God in their lives or, if God is there, he seems not to care for them. Jesus’ story about the absentee owner of the vineyard gives us some perspectives on how we should read this experience of God’s absence of silence in our lives:

  • First, the vineyard is always the owner’s. even in His absence, He is the one in control. He has the rights. The workers therein are just tenants, stewards. The same is true with our lives. They are God’s. we should never doubt His power, his presence and his concern for us even during those times when we feel it hard to sense Him.
  • Second, the owner sent servants to collect His due from the harvest of the vineyard.But the tenants were unmindful. Likewise in our lives, God is not totally uninvolved. It could be that he is sending us His “servants” who are bearers of His messages. These could mean persons, places, events. All these could be sacraments of His presence. We just have to be more responsive and sensitive.
  • Third, the vineyard owner’s absence was an exercise of trust in the capacity of the tenants to do good. It is sad to realize, though, that the tenants did not measure up to the trust and goodwill of the owner. When God is absent or silent, it could also be that he trusts us to do good using what he has given us: our talents, our ability to discern, our guts and the basic goodness that is within us. Fr. Domie Guzman, SSP, New Every Morning New Everyday, p. 180)

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June 4, 2012

St. Francis Caracciolo
Monday of the Ninth Week
GREEN

2 Pt 1:2-7
Ps 91
Mk 12:1-12

Parable of the Tenants 

1[Jesus] began to speak to [the chief priests, the scribes, and the elders] in parables. “A man planted a vineyard, put a hedge around it, dug a wine press, and built a tower. Then he leased it to tenant farmers and left on a journey. 2At the proper time he sent a servant to the tenants to obtain from them some of the produce of the vineyard. 3But they seized him, beat him, and sent him away empty-handed. 4Again he sent them another servant. And that one they beat over the head and treated shamefully. 5He sent yet another whom they killed. So, too, many others; some they beat, others they killed. 6He had one other to send, a beloved son. He sent him to them last of all, thinking, ‘They will respect my son.’ 7But those tenants said to one another, ‘This is the heir. Come, let us kill him, and the inheritance will be ours.’ 8So they seized him and killed him, and threw him out of the vineyard. 9What [then] will the owner of the vineyard do? He will come, put the tenants to death, and give the vineyard to others. 10Have you not read this scripture passage:/ ‘The stone that the builders rejected/ has become the cornerstone;/ 11by the Lord has this been done,/ and it is wonderful in our eyes’?”/ 12They were seeking to arrest him, but they feared the crowd, for they realized that he had addressed the parable to them. So they left him and went away.

Reflection:

A man planted a vineyard. The parable tells us something about God, about ourselves, and about Jesus.

The landowner stands for God. He has great trust in his tenants, leaving everything to their care and their creativity. God waits for them to deliver, to produce, and to bear fruits. But the tenants claim the vineyard as their own, resorting even to violence to get rid of the true owner. But God patiently sends servant after servant, and finally his Son.

We are the tenants. God believes in our potentials. We are given responsibility for the vineyard and provided everything we need for the work. But there will be a day of reckoning: we will have to give God the produce.

The son is Jesus. The tenants, wanting to keep the vineyard, kill him. This is the supreme sacrifice of Jesus: he dies for our sins.

Do I return in gratitude to God my success and the fruit of my work? 

ph/index.php/online-resources/366-days-with-the-lord/1867-june-4-2012

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Parable of the Vineyard: “Finally the owner sent His son.” Few parables dramatize the patience of God so dramatically as this one. Three time the owner dispatches servants to obtain his share of the harvest.  And three times the vineyard tenants mistreat the servants. Finally, the owner, sends his “own dear son.” When this great overture of patience fails, the owner has no other alternative but to take action against the vineyard tenants.

God (the vineyard owner), who was so patient with the leaders of Israel (tenants), is patient with us, also. But as with the leaders of Israel, so with us, the day will come when God will hold us accountable for any failure on our part to respond to his generous patience.

Today’s reading invites us to ask ourselves: in what area of our life is God being especially patient with us?

Today’s reading invites us to pray: “Lord, don’t let your patience be lost on us.  Help us to be as patient with others as you are with us.” (Mark Link SJ, Illustrated Daily Homilies Weekdays, 1987 p. 82)

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Payback Time

June 1, 2015 (readings)

Memorial of Saint Justin, Martyr

Father Edward McIlmail, LC

Mark 12:1-12

Jesus began to speak to the chief priests, the scribes, and the elders in parables. “A man planted a vineyard, put a hedge around it, dug a wine press, and built a tower. Then he leased it to tenant farmers and left on a journey. At the proper time he sent a servant to the tenants to obtain from them some of the produce of the vineyard. But they seized him, beat him, and sent him away empty-handed. Again he sent them another servant. And that one they beat over the head and treated shamefully. He sent yet another whom they killed. So, too, many others; some they beat, others they killed. He had one other to send, a beloved son. He sent him to them last of all, thinking, ‘They will respect my son.’ But those tenants said to one another, ‘This is the heir. Come, let us kill him, and the inheritance will be ours.’ So they seized him and killed him, and threw him out of the vineyard. What then will the owner of the vineyard do? He will come, put the tenants to death, and give the vineyard to others. Have you not read this scripture passage: The stone that the builders rejected has become the cornerstone; by the Lord has this been done, and it is wonderful in our eyes?” They were seeking to arrest him, but they feared the crowd, for they realized that he had addressed the parable to them. So they left him and went away.

Introductory Prayer: Lord, I come before you humbly. As one who has frequently fallen into sin, I am aware of my weakness. Your great love, though, assures me that your grace can keep me on the path to holiness.

Petition: Lord, let me be open to you and your messages.

  1. Stand Corrected:Being corrected hurts. Being corrected in public hurts even more. And having one’s whole way of life corrected — well, that really stings. And so it must have been for the group of leaders who approached Jesus. Our Lord, in a not-so-subtle way, tells them that they are wrong. Wrong about their self-righteousness, wrong about their narrow reading of Scripture, and wrong about how they think God works in the world. This blinded them to the Son of God when he came among them. We like to think we would have been different ― we would not have rejected Jesus, we tell ourselves. Are we so sure? Aren’t we really like the leaders of Jesus’ time when we fail to listen to his agents ― a bishop, a parish priest, a legitimate superior? Have I said no to Christ lately?
  2. “Another Servant”God doesn’t give up on us after one try. He often sends a number of messengers into our lives, to draw us closer to him. Such is the illogic of a Father’s love. Where do we miss the clues that God sends us? It could be in something a child says; a line from a homily; an e-mail from a friend in crisis ― these are the ordinary means God uses to reach out to us. Old Testament prophets faced rejection by the people of God. Have things changed much? Could I be turning a deaf ear to a prophet?
  3. “This Is the Heir”The tenant farmers don’t seem very bright. They murder the son in order to get his inheritance. What father would give an inheritance to someone who killed his son? It doesn’t make sense. Then again, sin doesn’t make sense either. Many times we reject Christ in our life and then wonder why our prayers to God the Father go (seemingly) unanswered. What could we be thinking? How often do I offer up a sacrifice or an act of charity for a prayer intention?

Conversation with Christ: Let me live up to the demands of my faith, Lord. Let me realize that my dignity as a Christian demands that I try to live a life worthy of my baptism ― that I not be satisfied living like everyone else.

Resolution: I will offer up a decade of a rosary for a family member who is far from the faith.

© 1980-Present. The Legion of Christ, Incorporated. All rights reserved. Reproduced with Permission of Copyright Owner.

epriest.com/reflections/view/406?utm_source=bulletin_738&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Bulletin

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MONDAY OF THE 9TH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME (YEAR B) – MARCOS 12:1-12. KINSA MAN ANG TAG-IYA SA TANAN NING KALIBOTAN? Ang Sambingay sa mga Saop magpahinumdum kanato nga ang Dios maoy tag-iya sa tanang mga butang. Kitang mga tawo mga piniyalan lamang ug gilaoman sa Dios nga mag-amping ug magpalambo sa Iyang kabtangan ug kabuhatan. Nindot kini nga pahimangno tungod kay daghan kanato nagkinabuhi nga murag maoy tag-iya – laog ug hakog, mapahimuslanon ug abusado sa mga hinimo sa Ginoo. Ang Salmo 24:1 nag-ingon, “The earth is the Lord’s and everything in it; the world and those who live in it.” Sanglit iya sa Dios ang tanan, kinahanglan makamao kita mag-amping ug mogamit sa hustong paagi sa mga butang ning kalibotan. Hatagan nato ang Dios og bahin sa atong mga abot ug magpaambit kita ngadto sa isigkatawo kay kini mao may iyang gusto. Posted by Abet Uy

abetuy.blogspot.com/2015/06/monday-of-9th-week-in-ordinary-time.html

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Monday, May 30, 2016

MONDAY OF THE 9TH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME (YEAR C) – MARCOS 12:1-12. KINSA MAN ANG TAG-IYA SA TANAN NING KALIBOTAN? Ang Sambingay sa mga Saop magpahinumdum kanato nga ang Dios maoy tag-iya sa tanang mga butang. Matod pa sa Salmo: “The earth is the Lord’s and everything in it; the world and those who live in it” (24:1). Nindot kini nga pahimangno tungod kay daghang mga tawo ang nagkinabuhi nga murag maoy tag-iya – laog ug hakog, mapahimuslanon ug abusado – sa mga butang ning kalibotan. Tinuod man nga ang tawo maoy pinakabililhon sa tanang mga binuhat, ug tungod kaniya, gihalad sa Ginoo ang iyang kinabuhi. Apan, dili nato kalimtan nga ang mga mananap, kakahoyan, kadagatan, ug kahanginan mga binuhat usab sa Dios. Iyang gipiyal sa tawo ang kabuhatan ug kinaiyahan dili lamang aron gamiton, kondili aron usab ampingan ug palamboon. Posted by Abet Uy

abetuy.blogspot.com/2016/05/monday-of-9th-week-in-ordinary-time.html

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One Bread, One Body – Reflection for June 1, 2015

WILL YOU LEAVE JESUS OR SIN?

“They left Him and went off.” –Mark 12:12

Jesus told a parable which convicted people of their sin (Mk 12:1ff). When Jesus told a parable, He surely desired His hearers would respond by repenting and coming to Him. However, the response to the parable of the tenants was: “They left Him and went off” (Mk 12:12). Jesus’ hearers understood exactly what He was saying to them. They simply rejected both Jesus and His message.

How do you respond when Jesus convicts you of your sin? The Lord has long been sending you messengers to speak His Word to you (see Mk 12:2-4). He keeps talking of your sin not to condemn and punish you, but in order to save you (see Jn 3:17; Rm 8:1).

The Church begins each Mass the same way by inviting us to repent of our sin. How will we respond when the Lord convicts us of our sin? Will we leave Him and go away? (Mk 12:12) Or will we leave sin behind and come running to Jesus?

PRAYER: Father, I lay my pride, my will, heart, soul, and mind at the foot of Jesus’ cross. Give me only Your love and Your grace in return.

PROMISE: “Happy the man who fears the Lord, who greatly delights in His commands.” –Ps 112:1

PRAISE: St. Justin was the first Christian philosopher. He defended the faith and died as a martyr for Jesus.

mycatholic.com/reflections/2015-152.html

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June 1, 2015

Monday of the 9th Week of Ordinary Time

Tob 1: 3—2: 1b-8

Mark 12: 1-12

Vocation for Stewardship

The parable of Jesus about the vineyard and the wicked tenants irritated some of his listeners because they perceived that “he had told the parable against them.” They left him immediately. In fact, we must admire those people because they had at least a certain degree of self-awareness in spite of their incorrigible self-righteousness. However, through the parable of the wicked tenants Jesus was not just pointing his fingers at the scribes and the Pharisees of his time alone but at every human being who attempts to claim the ownership of what is entrusted to him/her. Jesus wants us to be conscious that whatever we have, we have received free and are given to us for a purpose. The tendency to forget the duties and responsibilities attached to the gifts and attempting to gain the ownership of the things at hand is nothing new. We can trace it back to our first parents at the Garden of Eden.

The landlord in the parable completed all preliminary works needed for a productive vineyard and entrusted it to tenants so that they may take care of it and harvest it at the proper time and handover the produce as he sends his servants to collect them. However, the moment those tenants gained access to the vineyard they wanted to make it their own. This is a natural human tendency. Whatever we have, we consider them as our own – our private property on which nobody else has got any right or claim. We turn our back towards the fact that everything, including our very being is not our own. We do not have any claim over the blessings we are enjoying. They are all free gifts. Day after day we are reaping the fruits of the hard work of others as if we are entitled to have them all. We forget the fact that we were and still are constantly at the mercy and goodwill of others.

Our vocation is for stewardship. We are blessed in order to be blessings for others. Our time, talents and treasures – these are given to us not to hide or conserve them as precious possessions but to distribute them to the needy. None of these blessings we can keep forever. They will be available to us only for a short while. The more diligently and generously we distribute them, the happier and praiseworthy our life will turn out to be. Dr. Kurian Perumpallikunnel CMI

navchetana.com/web/homilies.php?date=2015-06-1

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Monday of the Ninth Week in Ordinary Time

 May 30, 2016

2 Pt 1: 2-7; Mk 12: 1-12

Vocation for Stewardship

The parable of Jesus about the vineyard and the wicked tenants irritated some of his listeners because they perceived that “he had told the parable against them.” They left him immediately. In fact, we must admire those people because they had at least a certain degree of self-awareness in spite of their incorrigible self-righteousness. However, through the parable of the wicked tenants Jesus was not just pointing his fingers at the scribes and the Pharisees of his time alone but at every human being who attempts to claim the ownership of what is entrusted to him/her. Jesus wants us to be conscious that whatever we have, we have received free and are given to us for a purpose. The tendency to forget the duties and responsibilities attached to the gifts and attempting to gain the ownership of the things at hand is nothing new. We can trace it back to our first parents at the Garden of Eden.

The landlord in the parable completed all preliminary works needed for a productive vineyard and entrusted it to tenants so that they may take care of it and harvest it at the proper time and handover the produce as he sends his servants to collect them. However, the moment those tenants gained access to the vineyard they wanted to make it their own. This is a natural human tendency. Whatever we have, we consider them as our own – our private property on which nobody else has got any right or claim. We turn our back towards the fact that everything, including our very being is not our own. We do not have any claim over the blessings we are enjoying. They are all free gifts. Day after day we are reaping the fruits of the hard work of others as if we are entitled to have them all. We forget the fact that we were and still are constantly at the mercy and goodwill of others.

Our vocation is for stewardship. We are blessed in order to be blessings for others. Our time, talents and treasures – these are given to us not to hide or conserve them as precious possessions but to distribute them to the needy. None of these blessings we can keep forever. They will be available to us only for a short while. The more diligently and generously we distribute them, the happier and praiseworthy our life will turn out to be. Dr. Kurian Perumpallikunnel CMI

navchetana.com/web/homilies.php?date=2016-05-30

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ARE YOU KNOWN BY YOUR KINDNESS? – I performed many charitable works for my kinsmen and my people… – Tobit 1:3

One day, a plane hit a storm and was about to crash. The problem was there were four passengers and only three parachutes.

The first man took one parachute and said, “I’m a brain surgeon and my patients need me.” And he jumped off the plane.

The second man took the second parachute and said, “I’m a rocket scientist, one of the smartest men in the entire planet, and the world needs me.” And he jumped off the plane.

The third man was the Pope. He took the last remaining parachute and gave it to the fourth person who was a young boy. The Pope said, “Son, I’m an old man. I’ve served God enough. Go ahead and take this last parachute.”

The young boy smiled, “Your Holiness, it’s OK. There are still two parachutes left. The rocket scientist, the smartest man on the entire planet, jumped out with my backpack.”

Lesson?

The Pope won because he was kind.

The rocket scientist lost because he was not kind.

Kind people, at the end of the day, will always win.

Friend, do you want to be truly happy?

Be kind. Bo Sanchez (bosanchez@kerygmafamily.com)

Reflection: What good deed can you do for another person today?

Prompt me, Lord, to do a good deed each day, even to strangers.

kerygmafamily.com/modules/dailyreadings/read.php?date=2015-06-01

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WE ARE ALL APARTMENT DWELLERS – Nowadays, owning apartments and making a living out of rentals and leases can be a great challenge. While there are those who are conscientious with their obligations and limitations, some abuse their rights and privileges. There may even be tenants who would try to grab the property and would hide under all possible loopholes of the law. In such problematic situations, the owner may have to go  through a dragging and expensive lawsuit to assert his rights and claims.

Before God and His manifold goodness, Jesus warns us that we can actually behave like the renters whom we readily condemn for being arrogant and abusive. We may forget that all we have are just ours because of God’s mercy and entrustment. The following can be dangerous symptoms of our “forgetfulness” of being tenants and stewards:

Having No Time for God = Not finding time to look up to God, who gives us each breath and each day to enjoy what we have, is a danger sign of a disoriented attitude to life.

Uncaring for the Needy = The person, in this case, forgets that we are but channels of blessings for others.

Neglecting Proper Rest = Money, achievements and power become too important that one is even willing to sacrifice personal health and self for these new forms of idolatry.

Setting Aside Family and Personal Relations = The person who has this attitude surely forgets the simple rule of peace and happiness — that these are not found in things but in person-to-person relationships.

There is nothing wrong with enjoying our earthly life, for this life is God’s first creation for humans (cf Genesis 1). Constantly, though, we have to examine our level of attachment. Life and time are free. But they are not ours. Tenants and renters, we all are. Fr. Domie Guzman, SSP

REFLECTION QUESTIONS: Are you a real-life renter? How do you practice Christian justice in this aspect of your life? How do you make returns for all that the Good Lord has given you? Do you practice tithing faithfully?

Thank You, Lord, for all Your gifts and blessings. Enable me to spend my life well for Your glory.

kerygmafamily.com/modules/dailyreadings/read.php?date=2015-06-01

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Friday, May 27, 2016

Reflection for May 30, Monday of the Ninth Week in OT; Mark 12:1-12

Reflection: There is a story of a high and mighty government official who was asked to resign from his post. For the reason that he engaged in high stakes corruption and abuse of authority. Instead of voluntarily resigning he clung to his post because according to him there is still much more money to be stolen in the coffers of his government office.

Since he was not willing to resign he was investigated and was found guilty it resulted in the forfeiture of all his government benefits. This high government official was so greedy that it became the instrument for his disgrace.

In our gospel the tenant farmers are the greedy characters, they were the religious leaders of Israel, they were not willing to give what was due to God which was represented by the owner of the vineyard. They killed all of the messengers (prophets) even the only begotten son of the owner they killed as well. At the end, because of their greed the tenant farmers were severely punished by the owner.

It doesn’t pay to greedily amass immoral wealth. For whatever we have now that is borne out of our greed will eventually be taken away from us. – Marino J. Dasmarinas

mjdasma.blogspot.com/2016/05/reflection-for-may-30-monday-of-ninth.html

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May 30, 2016

REFLECTION:       In the garden of Eden, Satan, disguised as a talking snake, entices Adam and Eve to eat of the forbidden fruit, promising them that “you will be like gods,” a false promise.

Paradoxically, though, it had always been God’s plan to share his divinity with the creatures he had made. But this gift of his was to be received as a gift, and not wrested from him by stealth. That is why Adam and Eve’s underhanded attempt to snatch at divinity was such a miserable failure.

But God did not give up on us. He kept his dream of making us gods, provided we graciously accepted this as a gift—a gift made possible by our becoming one with his Son in obedient love. That is why, in the last book of the Bible, we hear Christ say: “I will give the victor the right to sit with me on my throne, as I myself first won the victory and sit with my Father on his throne “(Rev 3:21). All this is alluded to in the mysterious words of Peter’s Letter contained in today’s first reading, “you share in the divine nature.”

Yes, our enthronement has already begun.

CLARETIAN COMMUNICATIONS FOUNDATION, INC.

8 Mayumi Street, U.P. Village, Diliman, 1101 Quezon City, Philippines

Tel.: (02) 921-3984, 922-9806 • Fax: (02) 921-6205

schoolofthewordonline.com/scriptural-library/daily-gospel/english/item/3549-may-30-2016

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See Today’s Readings:  Year I,   Year II

Back to: Monday of the 9th Week of the Year

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