Friday of the 6th Week of Easter

John 16:20-23

The Disciples’ Joy

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES:

Travelling with a companion on a deserted road in my mission assignment one day, we passed by a vehicle that was noticeably moving slowly. Assuming the car had mechanical trouble, we stopped and offered assistance. The driver, a fellow missionary (not an SVD), had a flat tire. However, he had no spare tire, so I exclaimed: “What? Running a car in a mountainous area and so remote without a spare tire?” and he said to me: “You know, I was already an hour on the road when I remembered that I left behind my spare tire at the mission house downtown but I said to myself God will provide for my needs.” “And you believe that?” I asked. “Yes!” came the candid reply. “And I assume He sent you.” We laughed but realized the truth of God’s abiding presence even in the smallest detail of our daily life.

Many times in our life, while caught up in a fast and frenzied world, we lose the sight of the Lord. And before us, are plastered all sorts of worldly promises and distractions offering us nothing but confusion. What is the promise of our Lord in moments like these? Well, one ad says: “Times like these, you need a Juicy Fruit gum!” But we Christians hope for companionship with our Lord as we turn our lives only to Him. He is not only our “Juicy Gum,” but our “Lifesaver” as well! We can turn desolate moments into beautiful and faith-filled occasions. “Whatever we ask the Father in Jesus’ name, He will give us!” (Fr. Kids del Parto Bible Diary 2002)

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I shall see you again; then your hearts will rejoice with a joy no one can take from you.” As the first Ascension event is about to take place, Jesus consoles His distressed disciples. He compares their grief to that of a woman who travails in labor. But when the child is born, the mother is no longer in anguish; she rejoices that a new life has been brought forth. The prophet Isaiah used this image of childbirth when speaking of the suffering of Israel before her restoration (26:17-19). Saint Paul said that: “All creation is groaning and in pabor pains” awaiting the fullness of redemption (Rom 8:22). Jesus’ disciples are in tribulation because they are on the threshold of a completely new experience: “the trouble with hello is goodbye.” But when they see the Risen Lord, the disciples will surely rejoice. On that day, their joy will be full and incomparable.

Do we also turn to God in times of pain and suffering? Do we also bring consolation to those who are in pain and suffering? Do we ever realize that life is an interplay of joy and sorrow? Life is never always full of sorrows. Life too brings with it joy that God alone could give. An anonymous writer said; “God knows the bitter, weary way. He knows the endless striving day by day. He knows how hard the fight has been. The clouds that come our lives between. The wounds the world has never seen, He knows. We still can bear it, feeling this God knows.” (Fr. Louie Punzalan, SVD Bible Diary 2004)

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This coming Sunday is the feast of the Ascension, when all of us in the Church remember and celebrate Jesus’ return to the father from whom He has come. Today we find Jesus preparing the apostles and ourselves also, for the time when He will no longer be physically present and we will in a new relationship with the Father and with each other through Jesus.

With Jesus we are now completing the Easter experience in our liturgy and we are all preparing to renew and to live this Easter experience in our lives. Parting is always difficult, but this gospel passage is a message of consolation and hope, as well as a warning for Jesus’ disciples and for all of us.

When Jesus died on the cross all the apostles ran away. Why would they do in the future when the going got difficult? What would we do? Obviously Jesus was worried about this and showed concern and hope for the apostles themselves, as He does for us also. The growth of the Church has vindicated His hope.

We suffer as Christians, we are often afraid, we feel the contradiction between our present lives here in the world and our hope in Christ’s coming, we are aware of our own weakness and inadequacy, we are misunderstood and frequently ridiculed and even occasionally persecuted by other people. However, these are growing pains in the process of emerging as the people that God wants us to become and forming our environment according to God’s plan. Even though Christ may seem at times to be far away from us, it is important that we do not allow ourselves to be discouraged or crushed by the difficulties and sadness that we meet in our lives.

It would be a great encouragement to the apostles and for us to know that we can ask in Jesus’ name for anything and that will be granted to us. They have been educated by Jesus and brought up to live His life and we are invited to do the same. Obviously they will not ask for anything contrary to the name of Jesus. Hopefully, neither will we! (Fr. Alan Meechan, SVD Bible Diary 2007)

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“The Bucket List” is the title of a movie about two terminally-ill men who went on a journey to fulfil a wish list before finally saying goodbye to their loved ones. The bucket list is a list of things to be done before they die.

The gospel today is part of the farewell discourse of Jesus. Before His passion and death, He prepares the apostles for His departure. He makes a list of things to be said and done. He says that they will face trials and persecutions. People will reject them. The apostles will experience anguish and sorrows. Then He consoles them and speaks words of encouragement. He tells them to remain strong and not be afraid. He will leave them but He will send the Holy Spirit. Then they will receive joy and will be able to speak with courage because He will always be with them.

This is also exactly the situation of the apostle Paul. In the first reading, he was accused by the people of Corinth. Paul feared for his life. Yet he endured in faith and spent the rest of His life spreading the gospel.

One day, we will also leave this world behind. How would you like to spend the rest of your life? What do you plan to do with your life? How would you like to leave this world behind? What do you have in your bucket list? (Fr. Jose Honorio P. Mateo, SVD Bible Diary 2012)

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May 6, 2016 Friday

A sage came to a King once to give him a small piece of scroll on which was written: “This too shall pass.” He kept this to heart and promised to apply it in his life. One day, an emperor challenged the king, and war broke out between the two kingdoms. In the battle eld, the king thought they were trapped and was filled with fear. Where his soldiers hid him in the cracks of a mountain pass to mislead the enemies, he repeatedly said “this too shall pass” and found respite. Returning jubilant for the troops’ successful defeat of the opposition forces, he also repeated, “this too shall pass,” and found sobriety. The king soon realized, that in the midst of joy and pain, happiness and sorrow, all these things shall pass, just as all of us shall pass in this world.

“This too shall pass” must not make us mere spectators as life unfolds. In our Good News today, we read that a woman’s horrible pain in childbirth is temporary – soon replaced with the joy of motherhood. It reminds us that in situations with “dead ends” and where there is no place to run to or hide, we continue to have hope and faith. This too shall pass. Even death is no “dead end”, this season of Easter reminds us, it is only the gateway to Life.

As we soberly celebrate Easter joy, let us also nd solace in His Suffering and Death for our sins.

Offer your pains, addictions, and trials to Jesus, the Divine Word, and know that Life comes after dying. This too shall pass, kaya kapit lang kapatid, and look forward to that day when we can all share life, in a New Life spent with our Resurrected Lord. (Fr. John Ferdinand M. Cruz, SVD Parokya San Miguel, Mabuhay, Zamboanga Sibugay Bible Diary 2016)

rveritas-asia.org/index.php/daily-reflection/631-may-6-2016-friday

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My Reflection for Friday May 30, Sixth Week of Easter John 16:20-23 – Reflection: A good man was wondering about how difficult his life was. He was in debt and his house was possessed by a bank due to unpaid loans. He was now questioning the Lord about his very difficult life. After a few days he won in a lottery and he was able to pay everything and he had more to spare and save.

Jesus was telling the disciples that they would go through difficult moments in their lives while others are rejoicing. Nonetheless, Jesus was also assuring His disciples that for as long as you stay with me you all will be able to pull through all of your difficulties.

We must always remember that the life that we have chosen with Jesus will not always be a bed of roses. There shall be drought and loneliness we may even feel alone but we will be able to pull through all of these emotional and other difficulties because we continue to hold and rest our destiny upon Christ Jesus.

Let us never hold-on to this world for it will never help us solve our problems/difficulties in life. Let us rather hold-on to Jesus for HE has the words of eternal life (John 6:68).

Are you in a difficult situation now? Hold-on to Jesus and rest your hope in Him alone. (Marino J. Dasmarinas)

mjdasma.blogspot.com/2014/05/my-reflection-for-friday-may-30-sixth.html

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Friday, May 6, 2016

Reflection for May 6, Friday of the Sixth Week of Easter; John 16:20-23

Reflection: A good man was wondering about how difficult his life was. He was in debt and his house was possessed by a bank due to unpaid loans. He was now questioning the Lord about his very difficult life. After a few days he won in a lottery and he was able to pay everything and he had more to spare and save.

Jesus was telling the disciples that they would go through difficult moments in their lives while others are rejoicing. Nonetheless, Jesus was also assuring His disciples that for as long as you stay with me you all will be able to pull through all of your difficulties.

We must always remember that the life that we have chosen with Jesus will not always be a walk in the park. There shall be drought and loneliness we may even feel alone but we will be able to pull through all of these emotional and other difficulties because we continue to hold and rest our destiny upon Christ Jesus.

Let us never hold-on to this world for it will never help us solve our problems/difficulties in life. Let us rather hold-on to Jesus for HE has the words of eternal life (John 6:68).  – Marino J. Dasmarinas

mjdasma.blogspot.com/2016/05/reflection-for-may-6-friday-of-sixth.html

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OUTWARD PRAISE: Sing praises to God, sing praises; sing praises to our King, sing praises. – Psalm 47:6

At the salon, clients were having their hair straightened or permed. When each lady was done, she would casually thank the hairdresser. I’ve been visiting that salon for years but I never thought to also praise the hairdressers for something other than their service. So I said to my stylist, “You know, Jo, you look pretty today — with your hair nicely curled and makeup done well. The salon is lucky to have you work for them.”

Her expression lit up like the sun. She made me repeat what I had said, then she called a fellow stylist to tell her what I had said about her. Imagine how a sincere, unexpected compliment can make a person’s day. Her happiness also made me happy.

We may think that God doesn’t need validation from us. Let’s appreciate with outward praise the bounty of blessings and unconditional love we receive from God. Let’s burst out in joyous song and pay it forward by praising others. When we give praise to Him, we expand our hearts and create space for more blessings to come. Gina J. Verdolaga (mgjver@yahoo.com)

Reflection: “And when he came near, even now at the descent of the Mount of Olives, the whole multitude of the disciples began to rejoice and praise God with a loud voice for all the mighty works that they had seen.” (Luke 19:37)

Thank You, Lord, for allowing me to serve my brothers and sisters in Your name.

kerygmafamily.com/modules/dailyreadings/read.php?date=2014-05-30

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1ST READING: Paul spends a year and a half in Corinth. The work of evangelization is normally slow and steady. One first has to identify the key figures in the community and convince them of the Gospel. Once that is done, they will begin to take the lead in convincing the next generation of evangelists, and so on. Never think that the work of evangelization is quick or easy. Acts 18:9-18

GOSPEL: Grieving, mourning and weeping are all part of the work of sharing the Gospel. We will weep over our failures; we will mourn the hardheadedness of the people; we will grieve those who do not want to honor the Lord in their lives. It has been like this from the beginning, when Jesus wept over Jerusalem because the people were reluctant to respond to His preaching. John 16:20-23

think: Grieving, mourning and weeping are all part of the work of sharing the Gospel.

kerygmafamily.com/modules/dailyreadings/read.php?date=2014-05-30

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THE FATHER WILL GIVE US ALL THAT WE NEED: The promise of Jesus at the end of today’s Gospel reading is not a blank check for anything that we might desire. The context in which the promise is made clearly indicates to us that the person asking the blessings of the Father is a disciple who wants to proclaim the Kingdom of God. This effectively limits the promise to those things that we need for our faith walk with Jesus.

That’s a bit of a pity, you might say. Well, yes and no. It is ridiculous to think that God will give everyone everything they want without any basis for it. But it makes a lot of sense that He would give all that is needed for the proclamation of the Gospel. That is His stated objective throughout the Scriptures and at the heart of every revelation through the lives of the saints. What Jesus is really saying is that those who seek to serve the Kingdom will not find God wanting in providing the means to do exactly that.

The saints know that this is true — it is one of the secrets of their success. They simply trust that when they act on the will of God, He will provide everything that is needed to accomplish His will. It takes a lot of courage to step out and launch a new Church initiative that needs huge funding. However, we cannot sit around and do nothing for fear of looking like a fool if the funding does not come.

Let us follow the path of discipleship without concern for how we will look in the eyes of others as that will only hinder us from obeying God. Let us always seek to put the mission and ministry of the Gospel first so that all may come to know the gift of salvation in their lives. Fr. Steve Tynan, MGL

REFLECTION QUESTION: Do you ever doubt that God will give you everything you need when you follow Him?

Holy Spirit, help me to let go of my need to look good in front of others and to put Christ above everything in my life.

kerygmafamily.com/modules/dailyreadings/read.php?date=2014-05-30

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THE WAY OF BEAUTY – One of the many descriptions the papacy of Pope Francis has been given is that it is a ministry of gestures. Pope Francis is not the philosopher/poet that St. John Paul II was. Neither is he the strict academician/theologian that Benedict XVI is. Pope Francis, though certainly not lacking in intellectual depth and seriousness, evangelizes the culture by the way of beauty. In the short period of his papacy, the world has been captivated by stirring images of an approachable churchman — hugging children, kissing disfigured individuals, washing the feet of women and convicted persons during the rites of Holy Thursday Mass.

Because beauty is attractive to everyone, even non-believers are beginning to take a look at the Church that Pope Francis leads. Even secularists like Elton John, who otherwise totally just ignore the Church and consider Her irrelevant, considers him their “hero.” Beauty is accessible to anyone. It attracts the human heart. And when you have attracted the heart, the proclamation of truth will not be far behind. Here lies the genius in Pope Francis’ papacy.

Through his ministry of gestures and the way of beauty, Pope Francis is able to share the fragrance of Christ and His message in a manner that is non-threatening and non-intimidating.

All throughout the week, we have been reading the apostolic efforts of Paul and his companions in the Acts of the Apostles (see today’s First Reading). The faith that we have right now, we owe to their bold proclamations. But the perpetuation of that same faith, we owe to the persuasive and attractive evangelizing ways of modern successors of Peter and their collaborators.

How engaging it would be if every Christian becomes an evangelizer through the way of beauty. Let us not forget that the Gospel is a proclamation, not an argumentation. That’s why you share it, not shove it in people’s throats.Fr. Joel Jason

REFLECTION QUESTION: In what simple way today can you evangelize through a ministry of gesture?

Lord, make me an ardent yet gentle proclaimer of Your Gospel. Amen.

kerygmafamily.com/modules/dailyreadings/read.php?date=2016-05-06

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On Grieving and Rejoicing

May 15, 2015 (readings)

Friday of the Sixth Week of Easter

Father John Doyle, LC

John 16:20-23a

Jesus said to his disciples: “Amen, amen, I say to you, you will weep and mourn, while the world rejoices; you will grieve, but your grief will become joy. When a woman is in labor, she is in anguish because her hour has arrived; but when she has given birth to a child, she no longer remembers the pain because of her joy that a child has been born into the world. So you also are now in anguish. But I will see you again, and your hearts will rejoice, and no one will take your joy away from you. Amen, amen, I say to you, whatever you ask the Father in my name he will give you.”

Introductory Prayer: Lord, as I begin this prayer I offer you my whole self: my thoughts, desires, decisions, actions, hopes, fears, weaknesses, failures and petty successes. I open my entire being to you, aware that you know everything already. I’m certain of your mercy and of the purifying power of your penetrating, loving gaze.

Petition: Lord, give me great peace and interior joy in the midst of life’s trials.

  1. “You Will Weep”Grief is not an agreeable experience in itself. Jesus doesn’t promise his disciples that by following him they will be shielded from the sorrow characteristic of any exile in a foreign land. A Christian’s value system is diametrically opposed to the worldly view. Be honest and the common opinion will consider you backward or naive. Be kind and you will be seen as gullible. Be faithful to the love of your spouse and you will be seen as having repressive tendencies. The list could go on and on. An authentic Christian stands out among the fingers of the world as truly the sorest thumb. Have I accepted this unpleasant and challenging element of Christianity?
  2. “I Will See You Again”“Your grief will become joy.” The disciples were surprised and discouraged by Jesus’ crucifixion, but Jesus’ death would not be the final scene in the play. After the dramatic events of Calvary came the joy of the Resurrection, a new and glorious life. How happy the disciples must have been to see Our Lord again! But even then Jesus seems to play “peek-a-boo” with his disciples. He walks through walls bringing them joy and then he just disappears again. We can have a similar experience in prayer. The alternation of dryness and consolation is an essential part of God’s pedagogy with us. Sometimes it seems that the Lord is right beside us and other times that he is on foreign business. Am I able to exercise my faith in the presence of the Lord beyond the state of my feelings at the moment?
  3. “Your Hearts Will Rejoice”Sometimes the charge is leveled against Christianity that its moral prohibitions are a source of sorrow and frustration. A closer look shows a different picture entirely. The closeness of the Lord, along with the recognition that the goods of this world are fundamentally good gifts lavished by the Father upon his children, brings profound joy. When we are able to distinguish the presence and action of the Lord in every created thing and through every circumstance, we experience a joy unknown to the world. “I will see you again, and your hearts will rejoice, and no one will take your joy away from you.” Do I have this joy founded on my faith and the awareness of God’s immense personal love? Does my obedience to the moral law stem from a complete trust in God who desires my happiness?

Conversation with Christ: My Jesus, when you are near me I experience great joy. I know that you are always with me. Help me to exercise my faith and to be able to strengthen the faith of those of my brothers and sisters who need me to show them your love.

Resolution: I will offer up any difficulty that the Lord sends me today for those who do not yet have the joy of his friendship.

epriest.com/reflections/view/389?utm_source=bulletin_730&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Bulletin

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One Bread, One Body – Reflection for May 15, 2015

WHO’S GOT YOUR TONGUE?

“Do not be afraid. Go on speaking and do not be silenced.” –Acts 18:9

On the first Christian Pentecost, the Holy Spirit dealt in a magnificent way with tongues. First, the Spirit appeared in the form of “tongues as of fire” (Acts 2:3). The apostles yielded their formerly silent tongues to speak in both native and foreign languages, proclaiming the prophetic Word of God (Acts 2:4ff). Their hearers used their tongues to repent and ask how to be saved (Acts 2:37).

Once the Spirit has your tongue, the battle begins. Satan accuses you of being foolish (Acts 2:13) and attacks any fears you may have. The world attempts to intimidate and silence you. This is what the apostles experienced once the Spirit took over their tongues. Nevertheless, the apostles yielded to the inspiration of the Spirit, not to the attacks of Satan and the world.

When we yield our tongues to the Spirit, the pressure to stifle the Holy Spirit and hold our tongues is so fierce that the Lord personally assures us: “Do not be afraid. Go on speaking, and do not be silenced, for I am with you” (Acts 18:9).

Today is the first day of the Pentecost Novena, nine days of prayer to prepare to receive the Holy Spirit in fullness at Pentecost. Give the Lord your mind, heart, soul, and tongue. Ask the Lord to teach you “what to say and how to speak” (Jn 12:49). Allow the Holy Spirit to control your speech in both your native tongue and in the spiritual gift of tongues.

PRAYER: Father, I ask You in Jesus’ name to prepare my heart to be a worthy dwelling place for the Holy Spirit.

PROMISE”I give you My assurance, whatever you ask the Father, He will give you in My name.” –Jn 16:23

PRAISE: St. Isidore and his wife were united in Holy Matrimony. They accepted their sacramental graces in full and are now both canonized saints.

mycatholic.com/reflections/2015-135.html

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FRIDAY OF THE 6TH WEEK OF EASTER (YEAR B) – JUAN 16:20-23. KANUS-A MAN MAHIMONG KALIPAY ANG ATONG MGA KASAKIT? Gigamit ni Kristo ang hulagway sa usa ka inahan nga nagbati. Dili lalim ang kasakit nga masinati sa usa ka babaye nga manganak. Apan ang tanan niyang kasakit malimtan ug mapulihan sa dakong kalipay inigkakita niya sa iyang nahimugsong anak. Sa atong pagsunod kang Kristo, makasinati usab kita’g mga sakripisyo – diha sa pagpakigbatok sa daotan, sa pagbarog sa kamatuoran, sa pagpasaylo, sa paghigugma sa mga kaaway, ug uban pa. Apan ang tanan natong kasakit mapulihan og kalipay human nato makita ang bunga sa atong maayong buhat. Nindot ang giingon ni Helen Keller: “The struggle in life is one of our greatest blessings. It makes us patient, sensitive and Godlike. It teaches us that although the world is full of suffering, it is also full of the overcoming of it.” Posted by Abet Uy

abetuy.blogspot.com/2015/05/friday-of-6th-week-of-easter-year-b.html

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Thursday, May 5, 2016

FRIDAY OF THE 6TH WEEK OF EASTER (YEAR C) – JUAN 16:20-23. KANUS-A MAN MAHIMONG KALIPAY ANG ATONG MGA KASAKIT? Gigamit ni Kristo ang hulagway sa usa ka inahan nga nagbati. Dili lalim ang kasakit nga masinati sa usa ka babaye nga manganak. Apan ang tanan niyang kasakit malimtan ug mapulihan sa dakong kalipay inigkakita niya sa iyang nahimugsong anak. Sa atong pagsunod kang Kristo, makasinati usab kita’g mga sakripisyo – diha sa pagpakigbatok sa daotan, sa pagbarog sa kamatuoran, sa paghigugma sa mga kaaway, ug uban pa. Apan ang tanan natong kasakit mapulihan og kalipay human nato makita ang bunga sa atong maayong buhat. Nindot ang giingon sa usa ka magsusulat: “Every struggle in your life has shaped you into the person you are today. Be thankful for the hard times; they have made you stronger and wiser.” Posted by Abet Uy

abetuy.blogspot.com/2016/05/friday-of-6th-week-of-easter-year-c.html

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Acts 18: 9-18

Jn 16: 20-23a

Your grief will turn to joy

Let us look around for a while. Do we find anybody who is really joyful around us? Are we really joyful? Most of the people whom we find are grieving. They live life with a long face, with anger and frustration. Yesterday I met a young man. He was working in an institution trying to cope up with life after a serious emotional break down and attempted suicide. But his institution could not sympathize with him. He is fired from his job after a year of probation. All of a sudden he is thrown out into darkness without a means to support himself. To make matters worse the money lender from whom he had borrowed money came to know that he lost his job. Immediately the money lender went to the bank and withdrew the last salary that was in his salary account using the cheque given as guarantee. Now the man is without a job and without a penny in his hand.

While reflecting on this passage I was just observing the people around the labourers, the office class, the religious, the priests and the government servants. On the face of a few I could find the shining radiance of their inner joy. But the majority was lurking in the dark. Jesus says: You will rejoice and no one will take away your joy. Is it because we are not with the resurrected Jesus, that we are still in grief and darkness?

What is this joy that Jesus speaks of? It is hard to define. But an example from the Gospel itself will explain it. Think of Mary Magdalene when she saw the risen Lord first time. It is written- Mary ran “with great joy to bring his disciples word.” Again “The disciples were glad when they saw the Lord.” This joy and gladness mentioned here are not originating from any physical or psychological pleasure. It is the result of a deep spiritual experience of the risen Lord. This joy that the Lord gives will be lasting joy. Nobody can take it away from us. St. Augustine says: “Let us rejoice and give thanks that we have become not only Christians, but Christ himself. Do you understand and grasp, brothers and sisters, God’s grace toward us? Marvel and rejoice: we have become Christ. For if he is the head, we are the members; he and we together are the whole person. . . ,” (as quoted in the Catechism of the Catholic Church, 795, p 210).

Dr Martin Mallathu CMI

navchetana.com/web/homilies.php?date=2015-05-15

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One Bread, One Body – Reflection for May 15, 2015

WHO’S GOT YOUR TONGUE?

“Do not be afraid. Go on speaking and do not be silenced.” –Acts 18:9

On the first Christian Pentecost, the Holy Spirit dealt in a magnificent way with tongues. First, the Spirit appeared in the form of “tongues as of fire” (Acts 2:3). The apostles yielded their formerly silent tongues to speak in both native and foreign languages, proclaiming the prophetic Word of God (Acts 2:4ff). Their hearers used their tongues to repent and ask how to be saved (Acts 2:37).

Once the Spirit has your tongue, the battle begins. Satan accuses you of being foolish (Acts 2:13) and attacks any fears you may have. The world attempts to intimidate and silence you. This is what the apostles experienced once the Spirit took over their tongues. Nevertheless, the apostles yielded to the inspiration of the Spirit, not to the attacks of Satan and the world.

When we yield our tongues to the Spirit, the pressure to stifle the Holy Spirit and hold our tongues is so fierce that the Lord personally assures us: “Do not be afraid. Go on speaking, and do not be silenced, for I am with you” (Acts 18:9).

Today is the first day of the Pentecost Novena, nine days of prayer to prepare to receive the Holy Spirit in fullness at Pentecost. Give the Lord your mind, heart, soul, and tongue. Ask the Lord to teach you “what to say and how to speak” (Jn 12:49). Allow the Holy Spirit to control your speech in both your native tongue and in the spiritual gift of tongues.

PRAYER: Father, I ask You in Jesus’ name to prepare my heart to be a worthy dwelling place for the Holy Spirit.

PROMISE: “I give you My assurance, whatever you ask the Father, He will give you in My name.” –Jn 16:23

PRAISE: St. Isidore and his wife were united in Holy Matrimony. They accepted their sacramental graces in full and are now both canonized saints.

mycatholic.com/reflections/2015-135.html

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May 06, 2016

REFLECTION: Today’s first reading begins with the account of a nocturnal vision given to Paul and in which the Lord Jesus says two striking things to Paul. The first one is the following: “Many people in this city are mine.” This is a mysterious statement because the population of Corinth is as yet mostly pagan, the work of evangelization having barely begun. Yet Jesus says that many of these pagans are already his. His in what sense? Presumably in the sense that they have the basic honesty and moral habits (i.e. natural virtues) which predispose them to receive the Gospel favorably. These good people are “attuned” to the things of God. When the Shepherd calls to them through the preaching of Paul, they will recognize his voice (Jn 10:4) and follow him.
The second striking statement of Jesus to Paul is this one: “I am with you.” Now throughout the Bible, when God sends someone on a mission he reassures that someone by telling him or her: “I am / I will be with you.” (Gen 26:3; Ex 3:12; Dt 31:23; Jos 1:5; 6:12, 16; etc.).

Genuine Christians know that Christ is always with them. This certainty is their strength and their consolation.

CLARETIAN COMMUNICATIONS FOUNDATION, INC.

8 Mayumi Street, U.P. Village, Diliman, 1101 Quezon City, Philippines

Tel.: (02) 921-3984, 922-9806 • Fax: (02) 921-6205

schoolofthewordonline.com/scriptural-library/daily-gospel/english/item/3525-may-06-2016

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See Today’s Readings:  Year I,   Year II

Back to: Friday of the 6th Week of Easter

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One Response to Friday of the 6th Week of Easter

  1. George Mungai says:

    Thank you so much for a beautiful sharing, its so inspiring. Fr. Njorogeu

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