Wednesday of Holy Week

Matt 26:14-25

The Betrayal by Judas

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES:

A local newspaper reported the arrest of a young man for killing his own parents. When his aged parents refused to give him money, the confessed addict committed an unthinkable crime just to satisfy his hunger for illegal drugs.

Judas Iscariot could never fathom the depth of God’s love for him.  He tried to measure and equate God’s love by what he thought was good for him: honor and wealth. He could not get that kind of honor with a Messiah who would be crucified soon. His line of vision was limited to what to what the world could offer. His selfish interest and worldly ambition blurred his sight; he could grasp the beauty of dying for someone because of love. Jesus tried to reach out to Judas with an offer of forgiveness even if he felt to his every bones the pain of rejection by someone whom he lived for three years of sharing and companionship. Betrayal is one of the worst crimes one could ever commit. It strikes us at our deepest self. We feel alienation and loneliness. However, an experience of betrayal may offer an opportunity to a deeper commitment to God and a trusting relationship with one another purified and motivated by love. (Fr. Ben Limsuan, SVD Bible Diary 2002)

*******************************************************************

One of the most painful experiences in life is the betrayal of a friend, someone in whom you have entrusted your innermost secrets, your hopes, dreams, plans and your very self.

Today we read about Judas betraying Jesus. Did Jesus make a mistake in choosing Judas to be one of His intimate friends? What led to this tragic decision of Judas?

Whatever Judas’ reason was Jesus’ greatness of heart stands all the more in sharp focus as He gives him the chance to realize his wrongdoing.

Hardened by his evil intent, his heart could not see any good from Jesus’ heart. Jesus’ behavior did not meet his expectations. He wanted to change Jesus’ life and mission instead of him changing his own and following Christ.

In the depths of my heart, can I say that I am following Jesus totally: His life, His values? Or do I secretly wish that He gives in to my desires, my wants? (Sr. Imelda, SSpS Bible Diary 2004)

******************************************************************

One of the worst things that can happen to us is to be betrayed by someone whom we have trusted so much or regarded as a friend. We become disappointed, to say the least. Betrayal accounts for much of the heartaches, broken hearts and bitterness that ruin many lives: of husbands and wives, lovers, parents and children, associates in business and ordinary friends. The experience of betrayal can make a person lost his trust in his fellowman or at least make him more careful in entering into relationships. Thus lady who became unlucky in love would say: “I’ll never fall in love again.” It can lead also to generalizations: “pare-pareho talaga kayong mga lalaki.” The hurt brought about by the disappointment usually takes time to heal. It can also be a life-changing event that can ruin forever one relationships with others. when we come to think about it, whenever we enter into a relationship of trust, we assume also the risk of begin betrayed or rejected. It is a sort of gamble. One just does what can be done and hopes for the best.

A Christian who strives to be true to his name is one who is called to create relationships, to build communities. He is prepared to encounter along the way ‘Judases” in one form or another who would betray him or at worst, derail his sincere efforts. He thus learns to accept others as weak and sinful, but always with a possibility to be strong and virtuous. The experience of betrayal does not stop a true Christian from carrying out his true mission. It rather strengthens his resolve to show the path of salvation to the many “Judases” in life. (Fr. Gil Alejandria, SVD Bible Diary 2006)

******************************************************************

Many commentaries mention that Judas had three possible reasons for betraying Christ. First, it may be avarice. At the anointing of Jesus in Bethany, Judas protested against the act of the woman who washed Jesus’ feet and poured expensive perfume on Jesus’ head. If the “wasted” perfume were sold, the money could be given to poor. In reality Judas had no concern for the plight of the poor.

The second reason could be his bitter hatred of Christ, since his plan for the deliverance of Israel from Roman power through rebellion did not conform with the plan of Christ for the salvation of humankind through the cross. Out of disillusionment that led to hatred and anger and betrayed the man from whom he had expected so much.

The third reason could be that Judas had no intention for Jesus to die. He thought that Jesus was just slow in implementing His plan of liberation. Judas wanted to compel Jesus to act as the former had wanted and planned. His act of betrayal was to force Jesus to use His power, as a divine messiah, to destroy the Romans.

All three reasons were motivated by selfish interest. Judas refused to accept Jesus as He was. Sometimes in our life, due to great human need, we tend to use God according to our own purposes and desires; we ask Him to bend to our will. God knows what is best for us and is closer to us than we to ourselves. We therefore trust Him for he really cares for us. (Fr. Melchor Cagape, SVD Bible Diary 2007)

*******************************************************************

More readily than not, we claim we are victims of betrayal – betrayed by a husband, a wife, a family member, a friend, an officemate and so on.  To have betrayed somebody however may not be that easy to admit.

When Jesus confronted His apostles, “Truly I say to you one of you will betray me.” Judas himself replied, “Surely it is not I, Rabii!”

Whatever evil Judas did, he has become the dark side of ourselves. We don’t like to look at him just as there are things we don’t like to look at in ourselves. He personifies that constant possibility of disloyalty and betrayal in our Christian life. However, our image of Judas leads us to also ceaselessly ask ourselves the question, ‘Is it I?’ Have I betrayed the Lord one way or the other? To ask ourselves these questions does not imply that we have been disloyal to our Lord but rather to make us steadfast in our faith and to understand the dark side of ourselves. What is the dark side we might ask?  It is when we allow ourselves to leave the presence of the Lord Jesus. That was Judas’ sad fate. Are we to allow it to happen to us? (Fr. Randy Botial, SVD Bible Diary 2008)

*******************************************************************

Judas is one of the most enigmatic figures in the Bible! Even though we concentrate on Christ’s Passion during this Holy Week, the liturgy invites us to reflect also on Judas. I find it easy to identify with Peter but I would never like to identify with Judas. And yet, there are parallels, Jesus chose Judas as the twelfth apostle. He drew him into His closest circle of friends, gave him a great responsibility in the group of disciples – to manage the common fund. Similarly, I was chosen to be a disciple and friends of Jesus. I feel His love for me and He has given me the great responsibilities of a disciple.

Jesus was gentle with Judas the Last Supper. I have experienced the same kindness of Jesus toward me when I actually deserved harsh treatment. Judas followed Jesus as I do. He had listened to Jesus as I do. He was ready to give three years of his life to be with Jesus. The same with me even, more than five decades already.

Here I wish the comparison to end. What can Judas teach me so that I do not do the last terrible step: betray my Lord? Judas heard Jesus but did not listen. He was not ready to do what Jesus taught. He ignored Jesus’ repeated call for repentance.

Repentance and ongoing conversion then must be my first step, repeated constantly over the years, to avoid the last step: betrayal. I must be brutally honest with myself, admit my evil tendencies and allow Jesus to heal me. I have to ask him to support me in my struggle to let the friendship he offers grow in me. In other words, I stay in constant communication with Him, always knowing that without Him I can do nothing. For I know that without Him I might be eventually do the last step Judas made. (Fr. Rudy Horst, SVD Bible Diary 2009)

************************************************************************

March 23, 2016 Wednesday

The drama of Holy Week thickens. Judas, finding the opportunity, finally decides to hand over Jesus. And Jesus, knowing that the time is running out for him, desires to offer an act of communion, with his friends through the Passover meal. In this context, he declares the betrayal that is about to happen.

The reactions of the disciples, human and ordinary as they are, show their lack of capacity for introspection and of their knowledge of Jesus as Lord. By asking the question: “Surely it is not I, Lord?” the Apostles deny the possibility of personal responsibility regarding this ignoble act. Certainly, each one of them knows what is in his mind. But they ask the question as if the betrayal comes from outside influence which is out of their control. Judas too knows very well what he is doing. The answer of Jesus is a reminder that ultimately all depends on him.

This attitude of the Apostles can also be found in us. Here in the mission, for example, we encounter individuals who, unless caught red-handed, would categorically deny their actions even in front of two or three witnesses. Or, if one finally admits his fault, he would nonetheless invoke the influence of a malevolent spirit that “overpowered” him. In the end, he would say he does not really know why he did what he did.

This is also true elsewhere. To save us from the horror of shame, we deflect the blame and we deny our responsibility. In a matter of time, we fail to recognize our faults and we tend to justify our actions. This haughty attitude, however, destroys our intimate relationship with Jesus and consequently deprives us of the healing power of his love.

All but one of the Apostles betrayed Jesus. They abandoned him. Peter exemplified the guilt and remorse of the apostles and they remained. Judas had totally lost hope of forgiveness and hanged himself. Finally, those who confronted the reality of the Passion and remained to recognize the frailty of the human spirit experienced the joy of being healed and forgiven. (Fr. Dindo Fallarme, SVD Benin, Africa Bible Diary 2016)

**************************************************************************

Holy Wednesday: The betrayal of Judas 

“Then one of the twelve, who was called Judas Iscariot, went to the chief priest and said, ‘What will you give me if I deliver Him to you?’ And they paid him thirty pieces of silver. And from that moment he sought an opportunity to betray Him” (Mt 26:14-16).

The name Judas has entered every language and is synonymous with betrayal. What makes Judas’ case unique, however, is that his motive was not entirely clear. Why did Judas betray his Master? Was his treachery motivated by greed, bitter disappointment with Jesus, hatred because of disillusionment, or all of these together?

Two years ago, we were treated to the news that a newly discovered “Gospel of Judas” might shed new light on the apostle’s identity and relationship with Jesus. The inference in the news reports was the Judas might have been unfairly made out to be a betrayer. Part of the Judas manuscript has Jesus collaborating with Judas to begin the drama of betrayal that eventually led to Jesus’ death. True or not, it is unlikely that pure greed was the sole motivating factor for Judas to betray Jesus. If his motive had only been greed, he should have been happy after receiving the thirty pieces of silver from those who wanted to arrest Jesus. Instead, he was thrown into despair and hanged himself.

So there is reason to believe that Judas never really intended Jesus to die. Maybe he thought Jesus was proceeding too slowly and not acting aggressively enough in setting up His messianic kingdom. Perhaps Judas only wanted to force Jesus’ hand by compelling Him to act. Come to think of it, his tragedy may be more of impatience than greed, more of his refusal to accept Jesus as He was than wanting to possess those thirty pieces of silver. As for Jesus, He knew beforehand what would befall Him and the one who would do it: “When it was evening, He sat at table with the twelve disciples; and as they were eating, He said, ‘Truly, I say to you, one of you will betray Me” (Mt:26:20-21). With these words, Jesus put all of His twelve apostles under trial and suspicion and challenged them to examine themselves rightly, lest they be high-minded and think themselves innocent and exempted from betraying Him.

One could argue that Jesus’ act of redeeming humanity came about as consequence of Judas’ betrayal. Yes, but the act of betrayal was itself a great evil. God can – and does – bring good out of even the most heinous human acts. But that does not make evil good. The fact of evil remains. Judas did not want to face that fact and so took his life. There is only one way then to avoid a similar trap and redeem our tendencies to be like Judas: To admit that we seldom have pure motives, for good or ill. Judas’ motives may well have been an emotional mixture of all of the above. Separated, none of them may have been strong enough to move him; but confused and overheated, they were a potent mixture. If we took time to think clearly, we would probably do a lot less damage in our lives. But that is what Judas was unable to do: Take time.

*******************************************************************

DEFENSELESS: it is natural for human beings to defend themselves. For example, our eyes blink to defend our eyes from dryness. If our eyes do not blink because of exposure to the elements, our eyes will dry up and we could go blind. We have hair in our nostrils. That is also a defense mechanism so that foreign objects will not enter our lungs and we will be protected from sick. If we get bitten by insects, the antibodies present in your body rush to that part of the body that is bitten and it becomes red. These antibodies that rush towards the wounded part or the bitten part actually also protect the entire body. If I am standing next to someone and instantly I bring out a clenched fist directed towards that person, instinctively he or she will move his or head or raise her or his hands. That is our defense.

Holy Wednesday does not teach us self-defense. Holy Wednesday teaches us defenseless.

In the First Reading, the suffering servant is beaten up, buffeted, spat upon, but he refused to defend himself. And in refusing to defensive, that suffering servant saved his people from their sins.

The Gospel is also about a man who chose not to defend Himself from His traitor. This Man is Jesus. He knew that He would be betrayed. He knew that there would be a pay-off and yet He refuse to protect Himself. He refused to defend Himself. There is power in being defenseless.

In a world where legal cases are filed in court because rights are violated or when we have to protect our good name, protect our integrity, protect our lives, protect our properties, Holy Wednesday says to us there is also greater power in being defenseless. Let us not forget that in choosing to be defenseless, the Lord saved us from our sins. Is it possible? I believe it is possible. But up to now, two thousand years after Christ, we have not really tried the gospel of peace. We have not really tried one hundred percent the gospel of defenseless. (Socrates Villegas, Love Like Jesus, p. 151)

*****************************************************************

Judas is one of the most enigmatic figures in the Bible! Even though we concentrate on Christ’s Passion during this Holy Week, the liturgy invites us to reflect also on Judas. I find it easy to identify with Peter but I would never like to identify with Judas. And yet, there are parallels, Jesus chose Judas as the twelfth apostle. He drew him into His closest circle of friends, gave him a great responsibility in the group of disciples – to manage the common fund. Similarly, I was chosen to be a disciple and friends of Jesus. I feel His love for me and He has given me the great responsibilities of a disciple.

Jesus was gentle with Judas the Last Supper. I have experienced the same kindness of Jesus toward me when I actually deserved harsh treatment. Judas followed Jesus as I do. He had listened to Jesus as I do. He was ready to give three years of his life to be with Jesus. The same with me even, more than five decades already.

Here I wish the comparison to end. What can Judas teach me so that I do not do the last terrible step: betray my Lord? Judas heard Jesus but did not listen. He was not ready to do what Jesus taught. He ignored Jesus’ repeated call for repentance.

Repentance and ongoing conversion then must be my first step, repeated constantly over the years, to avoid the last step: betrayal. I must be brutally honest with myself, admit my evil tendencies and allow Jesus to heal me. I have to ask him to support me in my struggle to let the friendship he offers grow in me. In other words, I stay in constant communication with Him, always knowing that without Him I can do nothing. For I know that without Him I might be eventually do the last step Judas made. (Fr. Rudy Horst, SVD Bible Diary 2009)

*******************************************************************

Editorial

Spy Wednesday: The betrayal of Judas

April 7, 2009, 6:14pm

Wednesday’s Gospel reading preludes the betrayal of Judas. How appropriate then is the sometimes used term of “Spy Wednesday’’ for this period before our observance of the passion, death and resurrection of Jesus.

The events that led Jesus to the cross were filled with intrigue, suspense, and an impending sense of disaster. Clearly, the powers of good and evil, light and darkness, sin and salvation were poised to exhibit themselves at the place called Golgotha. John’s Gospel account of Jesus’ betrayal seemed to show Jesus’ deep understanding of His role as the Messianic fulfillment. (Jn 14-17) Judas in his interrogatory and somewhat cynical statement of “Surely it is not I, Rabbi?’’ (Mt 26:25) provided the catalyst for the process of darkness to unravel.

The Synoptic tradition on the betrayal of Judas began about the time when the authorities in Jerusalem had determined to kill Jesus, and Judas engaged to betray Him into their hands. The Gospels of Matthew and Luke did not imply that the betrayal was induced by anything more than the money offered or that opposition to Jesus was Judas’ motive; indeed Judas appeared as the instrument of higher powers as Luke write: “Satan entered into Judas.’’ (Lk 22:3).

The event was not unexpected to Jesus, since at the Last Supper, He had announced His coming betrayal by one of the 12 disciples. While to the 12, this event seemed at the time most improbable, to Jesus it was not so and indeed was in keeping with the divine purpose as expressed in the Scriptures and was a necessary means for the accomplishment of the divine plan.

What is so significant about Spy Wednesday is that it reflects the daily struggles we all endure in order to accept a relationship with the Lord. To live the life that Jesus intended for us is a perpetual struggle on a daily basis with good and evil. Sometimes when we are questioned about our transgressions, we answer back. “It’s not me Lord.’’ But the tranquility of Jesus’ realization of His mission provides us with hope in the days to come.

There is a real message here in Jesus’ tranquil resignation to the events that are coming: Faith in the love and power of the Father. As believers in the power of God’s love and goodness, Spy Wednesday should provide a period for reflection and prayer. We need to examine our lives and look for the moments that we have falsely shared intimacy with our brothers and sisters in faith.

*******************************************************************

Word Alive

We betray Christ, too

By FR. BEL R. SAN LUIS, SVD

April 7, 2009, 6:16pm

Once a painter wanted to draw a picture of innocence. He found Rupert, a little child and painted him kneeling beside his mother at prayer.

The painter valued the portrait of young Rupert above all else. He hung it prominently in his study, labelling it “Innocence.”

Many years later when the artist was old, he had often thought of painting a counterpart — the picture of Guilt.

One day he purposely visited a neighboring prison. On the damp floor of the cell lay a wretched man shackled with iron.

His body was horribly wasted, his eyes hollow, years of a life of vices reflected on his face.

The man was a perfect subject for his painting on guilt. When he was through, he asked the condemned man his name.

His answer: “Rupert!”

The painter was aghast. It was the same person who inspired him to be his model for Innocence many years ago.

The fate of Rupert may be compared to one of Jesus trusted apostles, Judas Iscariot. No doubt, Jesus chose him in the beginning for his good qualities.

It’s well known that Judas was more educated and gifted than his peers who were simple, rugged fishermen, to which group he was assigned as treasurer.

But, like Rupert, he degenerated into a vicious thief and traitor.

Holy Wednesday commemorates the betrayal of Jesus by Judas Iscariot, thus the traditional name, “Spy Wednesday.”

The purpose of highlighting that tragic incident is to provoke us into examining our behavior as Christians. For isn’t it a fact that, at times, we’re not much different from Judas?

Don’t we betray Christ in the way we live?

For instance, one who has been the recipient of a special favor from a benefactor, but slanders and maligns him or her is a Judas. For Filipinos, walang utang na loob (ingratitude), like ungrateful children towards their parents, is “unforgivable.” Likewise, a government official who accepts bribe money to approve a dubious deal, or a judge who favors a litigant in exchange for a “cash-unduan” is a modern-day Judas.

Another sober reminder for us in today’s gospel is the powerful attraction of money. As a treasurer of band of apostles, Judas held the money bag but, as we read in the gospel, he was stealing from it.

It was also his greed for money that led him to betray his Master for 30 sordid pieces of silver.

Thus, Judas’ guilt should remind us to be religiously honest in handling money that is not ours. Our moral values should not be exchanged for a juicy bribe.

Wednesday is a very timely occasion to confront the truth about ourselves.

We have been called to be faithful followers of the Lord, to his teachings and values. To betray Him, like Judas did, is the blackest form of ingratitude.

Let us ask pardon from the Lord for the times we have been traitors through our sins, especially when we succumb to the attraction of dirty money.

St. Jude Novena. Due to the Maundy Thursday services, there will be no novena to St. Jude at the Divine Word Shrine at Christ the King Seminary Compound, Quezon City. You may make your novena privately.

************************************************************************

Editorial

Holy Wednesday

April 3, 2012, 6:45pm

MANILA, Philippines — In today’s Gospel, Judas asks the Chief Priest, “How much will you give if I hand Him over to you?” They promise him 30 pieces of silver. The story continues as Jesus and His disciples prepare for the feast of the Unleavened Bread. Jesus tells them, “Go into the city, to the house of a certain man, and tell him. The Master says: ‘My hour is near, and I will celebrate Passover with my disciples in your house.”’ (cf Mt. 26:17) The disciples did as they were told and when they started eating, Jesus said, “Truly I say to you: One of you will betray me.” Jesus accepts this truth about the coming days but He does not agonize on it; instead celebrates it.

Matthew’s Gospel starts with the idea of Judas’ betrayal and ends with Judas’ admission. Judas is seen in both John and Matthew’s account of this drama as our own reflection. At first, we may deny our failures and run off because we cannot handle the truth of our weakness. We also may accept the fact that we have our shortcomings but we do not do something about them.

In the first reading, Isaiah proclaims God’s providential care to his servants. He says, “The Lord God is my help, therefore, I am not disgraced; I have set my face like flint, knowing that I shall not be put to shame.” (cf Is 50:7) As Christians, we should be humble enough to accept our mistakes and do not deny them. We should not be afraid to return to our Father for He welcomes us and has compassion for us. He will not let us be disgraced but He will lead us back to His redeeming love.

Again, we are invited to see our own roles just as Judas, Peter, the Marys, and the disciples did in God’s great plan. We are reminded that whoever we are, whatever we have done in the past, we are welcome to His kingdom.

In this Lenten season, how have we faced our own shortcomings? Have we fully forgiven ourselves or we are still engrossed by our own limitations? As we continue our reflection, let us be reminded of a God who listens, cares, and understands us for who we are and who we have been.

Source: mb.com.ph/articles/356221/holy-wednesday

************************************************************************

Editorial

Holy Wednesday: Be guarded with our own reflections

April 19, 2011, 7:23pm

MANILA, philippines — As we approach the culmination of the Lenten season, it is important that we continue with our own individual reflections. We may be faced with a lot of stress and difficulties that make us feel we do not have time for our own quiet time. But this Lenten season teaches us how important it is to know our own limitations and how to cope with pressures in our daily living.

In today’s Gospel, Jesus reveals that one will betray Him. Jesus said to his disciples, “The Son of man goes as it is written of him, but woe to that man by whom the Son of man is betrayed! It would have been better for that man if he had not been born,” (Matthew 26:24) Judas had been paid 30 pieces of silver to deliver Jesus to the Chief Priest.

This Gospel reminds us that although we have been successful in fulfilling our duties as Christians, there is still a need to look into ourselves and contemplate on how we can still grow and how we can overcome our weaknesses. We are always tempted and sometimes we succumb to this because we tend to give in too easily. However, we only need to trust in God so that he will drive out the evil and help us win over adversaries in life.

In the first reading, Isaiah declares “The Lord God has given me the tongue of those who are taught, that I may know how to sustain with a word him that is weary. Morning by morning he awakens; he awakens my ear to hear as those who are taught.” (Isaiah 50:4) Isaiah reminds us that God is the one that will assist us; His presence in our lives gives us vitality, providing us more reasons to live in this world.

As we near the end of the Lenten season, we remember how Christ sustained His love for us until His death. Like him, may our love for another never wither and may it overwhelm all our hesitations.

mb.com.ph/articles/314851/holy-wednesday-be-guarded-with-our-own-reflections

*******************************************************************************

Word Alive

We betray Christ, too

By FR. BEL R. SAN LUIS, SVD

April 19, 2011, 7:15pm

MANILA, Philippines — Once a painter wanted to draw a picture of innocence. He found Rupert, a little child and painted him kneeling beside his mother at prayer.

The painter valued the portrait of young Rupert above all else. He hung it prominently in his study, labeling it “Innocence.”

* * *

Many years later when the artist was old, he had often thought of painting a counterpart—the picture of Guilt.

One day he purposely visited a neighboring prison. On the damp floor of the cell lay a wretched man shackled with irons.

* * *

His body was horribly wasted, his eyes hollow, years of a life of vices reflected on his face.

The man was a perfect subject for his painting on guilt. When he was through, he asked the condemned man his name.

His answer: “Rupert!”

* * *

The painter was aghast. It was the same person who inspired him to be his model for Innocence many years ago.

The fate of Rupert may be compared to one of Jesus trusted apostles, Judas Iscariot. No doubt, Jesus chose him in the beginning for his good qualities.

* * *

It’s well known that Judas was more educated and gifted than his peers who were simple, rugged fishermen, to which group he was assigned as treasurer.

But, like Rupert, he degenerated into a vicious thief and traitor.

* * *

Holy Wednesday commemorates the betrayal of Jesus by Judas Iscariot, thus the traditional name, “Spy Wednesday.”

The purpose of highlighting that tragic incident is to provoke us into examining our behavior as Christians. For isn’t it a fact that, at times, we’re not much different from Judas?

* * *

Don’t we betray Christ, too, in the way we live?

For instance, one who has been the recipient of a special favor from a benefactor, but fails to show gratitude is a Judas. And for Filipinos, ingratitude, like that of children towards their parents, is unforgivable. Likewise, a government official who accepts bribe money to approve a dubious deal or a judge who favors a litigant in exchange for a “cash-unduan” is a Judas.

* * *

Another sober reminder for us in today’s gospel is the evil attraction of money. As treasurer of the band of apostles, Judas held the money bag but, as we read in the gospel today, he was stealing from it.

It was also his greed for money that led him to betray his Master for 30 sordid pieces of silver.

* * *

Judas’ guilt should remind us to be meticulously honest in handling money which is not ours. Personal moral values should not be exchanged for a bribe or illegal sources like jueteng or drug trafficking.

Let us ask pardon from the Lord for having been traitors by our sins and, more importantly, reform or get rid of our wrongdoings.

* * *

St. Jude Novena. Due to the Maundy Thursday services, there will be no novena to St. Jude Thaddeus at the Divine Word Shrine at Christ the King Seminary Compound, Quezon City. You may make your novena privately.

mb.com.ph/articles/314847/we-betray-christ-too

********************************************************************************

My Reflection for April 16, Wednesday of Holy Week; Matthew 26:14-25 Reflection: For thirty pieces of silver Judas Iscariot sold His soul to the devil. Obviously Judas loved money more than his master otherwise he would not have betrayed Jesus. Indeed, the love of money is the root of every evil. Because of this greed, some have wandered away from the faith, bringing on themselves afflictions of every kind (1 Timothy 6:10).

What power does money have that we are willing to sell our souls to the devil so that we could have it? Money per see is not evil it becomes evil when we greed for it, when we allow it to possess us. But what price are we willing to pay just to have dirty money? Judas betrayed his master and eventually destroyed his very life for his greed for money.

There’s always a heavy price to pay when we allow ourselves to be possessed by our greed for money. Just observed those people who are greedy with money what happened to them? Where are they now? This betrayal of Judas courtesy of thirty pieces of silver sends us a disturbing lesson. That our greed and love for money will bring us no good only misery and countless more misery.

All the money in this will not buy us harmony in the family; all the money in this world will not buy us peace of mind and so forth. (Marino J. Dasmarinas)

mjdasma.blogspot.com/2014/04/my-reflection-for-april-16-wednesday-of.html

**********************************************************************************

JUDAS, THE SILENT MOVIE EPILOGUE: When evening came, Jesus was reclining at the table with the Twelve. And while they were eating, he said, “Truly I tell you, one of you will betray me.” –     Matthew 26:20-21

Bible translator Bob Russell sought a word for “forgiveness” in the language of the Amahuacas of Eastern Peru, and he discovered their unique way of asking for pardon. In that culture, if an offender wants to be reconciled with someone he’s offended, he says to him, “Will you speak to me?”

Had Judas approached Jesus, and spoken to Him, he would have been forgiven. Why am I sure? Simple. Jesus is the Word. It is His very nature to be “spoken” and to “speak.” Too bad Judas chose the path of a wordless silent movie with a tragic ending.

But is an epilogue possible? What if, because of the miracle of God’s mercy, Judas found a way to “speak” to God’s overwhelming love and ask forgiveness before he drew his last breath? Or maybe I’m just insisting on a happy ending for Judas. But wouldn’t Jesus insist on it more than I would? I’m certainly not more merciful than the Jesus that I know. Who knows, when we get to heaven, we may see Judas on “speaking terms” with Jesus again, the best of friendships re-bonded. Yeah!

Just asking and pleasantly wondering. Jon Escoto (faithatworkjon@gmail.com)

Reflection: Have you been on real “speaking terms” with God or are there things you don’t want to talk to Him about? Do you have someone you’re not on “speaking terms” with that God wants you to talk to?

Lord, thank You for always speaking to me. Let me speak of Your love and forgiveness.

kerygmafamily.com/modules/dailyreadings/read.php?date=2014-04-16

*********************************************************************************

1ST READING: God will give us the words we need to speak in witnessing to the Gospel. He will give us the grace of the Holy Spirit. God is not going to miss an opportunity to draw one of His children back into His presence. This is part of being His true servant — being available for the work of the Kingdom at all times. Isaiah 50:4-9

GOSPEL: Jesus is betrayed by Judas for 30 pieces of silver. I wonder what inspired Judas to enter into such a bargain. Every sin we commit is a betrayal of the goodness of God to us. We cannot blame Judas and put all the responsibility for Jesus’ death on him. We must take our share of the blame precisely because we all have sinned and so contributed to humanity’s need for a Savior. Matthew 26:14-25

think:  Every sin we commit is a betrayal of the goodness of God to us.

kerygmafamily.com/modules/dailyreadings/read.php?date=2014-04-16

**********************************************************************************

JESUS’ DEEP INNER WOUND: I am catching up with deadlines from the editor, so I am writing this reflection in the late evening of Mother’s Day 2013. For this day, my youngest sister wrote on her Facebook timeline: “No gift can compare to what a mother has given — life.”

I like this line very much because it is so true. The greatest pain for a mother is, I believe, inflicted not by her husband (although that could hurt, too) but by her beloved child for whom she has given and risked everything. As always, we can only be wounded greatly by the one whom we love the most.

In contemplating on the sufferings of Jesus for our sake, we will officially start tomorrow the Paschal Triduum. We will again read about and reflect on the unequalled physical hardships that our Lord Jesus endured to atone for all our offenses. But today, “Spy Wednesday” as we have traditionally referred to it, we commemorate the deep inner and emotional pain that went with Jesus’ Passion — by the act of betrayal of Judas Iscariot, one of the Twelve.

The Lord Jesus had chosen him, like the rest of the Twelve, from among so many followers and disciples. He singled him out as the one to whom to entrust the money of the group. Further, knowing about Judas’ inner turmoils and struggles, the Lord Jesus had done everything to reach out to his troubled heart and soul, while respecting his sensitivities and right to a good repute among the circle of the Twelve. Fr. Domie Guzman, SSP

REFLECTION QUESTIONS: Who have you inflicted with the most hurt and pain? What have you done to them? In what ways have they loved you? Recall too the persons whom you have loved in very special ways. What deep hurts have you experienced from them?

Lord, I lift up to You all the persons I have hurt. Heal them please. In the same manner, I lift up to You all the persons who have hurt me. I forgive them with Your grace.

kerygmafamily.com/modules/dailyreadings/read.php?date=2014-04-16

***********************************************************************************

FORGIVE YOURSELF – The Lord God is my help, therefore I am not disgraced. – Isaiah 50:7

In one large gathering, a young woman came up to me and asked, “Can you hear my confession?”

I shook my head, “I’m sorry, I’m not a priest.” But I saw desperation in her eyes as she told me, “But can I still confess my sins to you?”

“I can listen to you, pray for you, but I can’t absolve you of your sins,” I said.

She said, “That’s fine. I just need someone to talk to.”

We walked to a corner of the hall and she poured her heart to me, sharing her guilt. As she did so, I felt an urging from God to tell her, “My dear friend, God loves you more than you can ever imagine.” She began to cry almost uncontrollably. “Bo, I know God loves me. But I don’t love myself. I know God forgives me. But I can’t forgive myself for what I’ve done,” she said.

Through the years, I’ve met many people like her who’ve already asked for God’s forgiveness but can’t seem to forgive themselves. They seem to think that their sin is bigger than God’s love for them. They seem to think that their moral standards are higher than God’s standards.

God doesn’t want us to grieve and wallow in guilt. Focus on God’s love for you. Or you fall into despair. Bo Sanchez (bosanchez@kerygmafamily.com)

Reflection: Do you carry the guilt of some sins you’ve already confessed?

Father, help me with Your grace to forgive myself as You’ve forgiven me.

justmehomely.wordpress.com/category/016-holy-week-weekdays/

***********************************************************************************

HOLY WEDNESDAY (YEAR B) – MATEO 26:14-25. ADUNA BAY KANTIDAD, BUTANG, O KALIPAYON NGA SARANG MAKAPAHIMO KANATONG MALUIBON SA DIOS? Diha sa ebanghelyo, si Judas nangutana sa kadagkoan sa mga Judio, “Unsa may inyong ihatag kanako kon akong itugyan kaninyo si Hesus?” Kini nagpakita nga andam siya modawat og bahandi aron budhi-an ang iyang Ginoo. Adunay nag-ingon, “The saddest thing about betrayal is that it never comes from your enemies.” Kita, sama kang Judas nga sumusunod ni Kristo, adunay purohan nga maminaw sa yawa ug magbudhi sa Ginoo. Mahitabo kini kon tungod lamang sa bahandi, garbo ug lumalabay’ng kalipay, talikdan nato ang atong moral nga prinsipyo ug ang Ginoo aron magbuhat og dili maayo, sama sa pagpanikas, pag-apil sa ilegal nga negosyo, ug pagsulod sa bawal nga relasyon. Posted by Abet Uy

abetuy.blogspot.com/2015/04/holy-wednesday-year-b.html

***********************************************************************************

Tuesday, March 22, 2016

HOLY WEDNESDAY (YEAR C) – MATEO 26:14-25. ADUNA BAY KANTIDAD, BUTANG, O KALIPAYON NGA SARANG MAKAPAHIMO KANATONG MALUIBON SA DIOS? Si Judas nangutana sa kadagkoan sa mga Judio, “Unsa may inyong ihatag kanako kon akong itugyan kaninyo si Hesus?” Kini nagpasabot nga si Judas andam mobudhi sa iyang Ginoo basta lamang adunay bahandi nga iyang madawat. Adunay nag-ingon, “The saddest thing about betrayal is that it never comes from your enemies.” Kita, sama kang Judas nga sumusunod ni Kristo, adunay purohan nga maminaw sa yawa ug magbudhi sa Ginoo. Mahitabo kini kon tungod lamang sa bahandi, garbo, ug lumalabay’ng kalipay, talikdan nato ang atong moral nga prinsipyo ug ang Ginoo aron magbuhat og dili maayo, sama sa pagpanikas, pag-apil sa ilegal nga negosyo, pagbaligya og boto, o kaha, pagsulod sa bawal nga relasyon. Posted by Abet Uy

abetuy.blogspot.com/2016/03/holy-wednesday-year-c.html

***************************************************************************

March 23, 2016

REFLECTION: It is difficult to fathom the personality of Judas Iscariot. As he is presented in today’s gospel reading, he comes out in the darkest colors possible: not only is he willing to betray an exceedingly good man like Jesus to his mortal enemies, the chief priests, but he does this ignoble action for a sordid gain: thirty pieces of silver.
However, the Judas whom we meet here is no doubt the result of a long and complicated spiritual evolution. When Jesus chose him to become a disciple, surely Judas was then a potential candidate for holiness, like all the other apostles. For, if Jesus chose him, it was no doubt because Jesus could discern in Judas the seeds of greatness. Yet, at some point after that, Judas freely chose little by little to resist the call to holiness and to favor instead his fondness for money—this through a series of small and daily decisions.

In all this we see that Jesus always respected Judas’ freedom. Even when he became sure that Judas would betray him, he never expelled Judas from the Twelve. God rejects no one, even those who betray his love.

CLARETIAN COMMUNICATIONS FOUNDATION, INC.

8 Mayumi Street, U.P. Village, Diliman, 1101 Quezon City, Philippines

Tel.: (02) 921-3984, 922-9806 • Fax: (02) 921-6205

schoolofthewordonline.com/scriptural-library/daily-gospel/english/item/3481-march-23-2016

***************************************************************************

See Today’s Readings:  Year I,  Year II

Back to: Wednesday of Holy Week

This entry was posted in zz. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s