Tuesday of Holy Week

John 13:21-33, 36-38

Judas’ Betrayal Announced; Peter’s Denial Predicted

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES:

It is pathetic how we fight over positions for the fame or the money they might bring us. Eventually our wrong focus makes our work to suffer and everybody turns out to be the loser. This is why it makes sense that we detest traditional politics and politicians, where power counts at all cost, bringing in its trail a corrupted and damaged culture.

Even those closest to Jesus thought at first that the man they were following would bring them material honor and earthly renown. Little did they know that this King was actually to wear a crown of thorns, dying a most ignominious death that is worthy of a slave. Only then they would understand that this Son was sent by the Father not to be served but to serve, and that they, too, would not be true disciples if they would not do likewise.

‘Servant leadership’ is a much-discussed topic these days, and yet how many really understand what it means? And how many of those who think they understand truly live by it? We are prone to building little kingdoms in our respective workplaces and how hard it is for us to go when we already need to – solid proof that it is our petty self we are serving all the while. The paradox of the cross is that it is so difficult to emulate; as somebody remarks, we are mere ‘good weather disciples.” (Bro. Romy Abulad, SVD Bible Diary 2002)

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In two ways, Jesus tried to dissuade Judas from betraying Him. First, Judas was certainly seated or was reclining nearest the Lord for our Lord would not have been able to speak to Judas in private without the others overhearing the conversation. The sign is clear that such an arrangement during the Last Supper indicated that our Lord considered Judas an intimate friend. Second, our Lord’s gesture of offering Judas a morsel of food was, in the Jewish society, an act done by one who considered the other a genuine friend. Very sadly, Judas rejected these acts of our Lord’s reaching in love and compassion.

How often have we ourselves rejected God’s invitation to conversion? On this Holy Tuesday, indeed during these days of Holy Week, this reaching out of God to us is most vividly portrayed. Let us grab such a blessed opportunity. Such an opportunity can come in a form of receiving the sacrament of reconciliation during one of these days. It may be a call to offer a form of sacrifice like giving up some pride on our part and forgive someone whom we have been at odds with for quite some time. Of course, praying should characterize these holy days. Truly, the words said when we began the season of Lent on Ash Wednesday “Repent and believe the gospel” ring most true and loud for all of us during these holy days. (Fr. Emmanuel Meguito, SVD Bible Diary 2004)

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On the eve of the Feast of Passover, the paschal lamb is eaten. It commemorates the night when God intervened and liberated His people from the slavery of Egypt. It is to be remembered with gratitude.

As a memorial meal, Jesus and the Twelve took their places at table. In ancient times, to sit together at table expressed friendship, trust and fellowship. Therefore, sitting together with Jesus only meant one thing, they were His closest friends and that also meant, Judas. He was part of the trusted ones, but he betrayed the common bond signified by the meal.

Why God allowed the character of Judas in the story of salvation remains a mystery of Divine will. God’s thoughts are always greater than man’s. Let’s just put it this way, man builds the cross, God makes the Crucifix. The two are inseparably linked, without which there could be no redemption. Let us therefore make the Crucifix our boast and our glory. Without even hoping to understand why, let us bear its marks in our body firmly convinced in faith that it will bring us to the glorious end, the resurrection. “Whatever did not fit in my plans did lie within the plans of God,” says Edith Stein. With God, there are no accidents when we look through His eyes. (SSpS, Bible Diary 2006)

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Today is Holy Tuesday. The Tagalog translation of Holy Week is Mahal na Araw (Semana Santa in Spanish). However, Holy Week if literally translated, should be, Banal na Linggo. Mahal na Araw, knowing its deeper meaning, is a more appropriate translation for the following reasons. Mahal could mean four things. First, mahal could mean love. Second, it could mean, expensive. Third, it could mean a name of an actress. Lastly, mahal could mean banal.

True enough, God showed His love for us that He sent His only Son, our Lord Jesus Christ. He came to serve and save us. His love for us was so expensive that He gave His life for us. In God’s eyes, we are more famous and valuable than any earthly actress. As we savor His personal love for us it could truly make all of us banal.

To be holy or banal is not only for this Holy Week. The challenge is to be banal everyday – magiging banal araw-araw. To follow Jesus means to become banal araw-araw. How to become holy everyday?

Let’s meditate on and connect ourselves to the Paschal Mystery of our Lord Jesus Christ. Christ’s first passing over was a joyful one, His incarnation. He again passed over, this time to a very sorrowful situation, His suffering and death. After three days inside the tomb, He resurrected, His glorious passing over! This passing over from joyful to sorrowful to glorious state of life will transports us to Light! To follow Jesus doesn’t only mean to become holy; it also means to experience light and become light to others. (Fr. Glenn Gomez, SVD Bible Diary 2007)

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What makes Peter different from Judas? Judas deliberately betrayed his Master while Peter, in a moment of weakness, denied Him. Judas’ act was cold and calculated. Peter, however, never meant to do what he did. He acted impulsively, out of weakness and cowardice. The treachery of Judas, however, is seen at its worst when Jesus showed special affection to him at the Last Supper. After Judas took the morsel from Jesus, Satan entered into the former.

As disciples we must be on guard against Satan, who can turn love into hate, holiness into pride, discipline into cruelty and affection into complacency. The only shield that we can use against Satan is the Holy Spirit who will give us grace and strength in times of testing.

What is the glory that Jesus talks about? It is the glory of the cross, the glory of willing sacrificing one’s life for the sake of another. In the cross we see a new way of love, a love that is selfless, sacrificial, forgiving and compassionate beyond comprehension. Jesus commands us, His disciples, to love one another just as he has loved us. (Fr. Romeo Bacalso, SVD Bible Diary 2008)

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Holy Tuesday: The denial of Peter 

Peter’s willingness to stand up for Jesus was evident when Jesus was arrested.

John recorded it in his gospel: “Then Simon Peter, who had a sword, drew it, struck the high priest’s slave, and cut off his right ear. The slave’s name was Malchus. Jesus said to Peter, ‘Put your sword into its scabbard. Shall I not drink the cup that the Father gave me?’” (Jn 18:10-11). So how did Peter go from a brave follower in one instant to a complete and utter coward a few hours later?

In those few hours after Jesus was arrested, Peter had undeniably some time to think. And it is apparent that he saw his own life as more valuable than professing his friendship with Jesus: “Then the maid who was the gatekeeper said to Peter. ‘You are not one of this man’s disciples, are you?’ He said, ‘I am not.’ …And they said to him, ‘You are not one of his disciples, are you?’ He denied it and said, ‘I am not.’ One of the slaves of the high priest said, ‘Didn’t I see you in the garden with him? Again Peter denied it. And immediately the cock crowed.” (John 18:17-27)

Keeping himself from being arrested thus became the focus of Peter’s thoughts. Three times, just as Jesus had prophesied, Peter denied Jesus in the courtyard. Aware that to be identified with Jesus would demand from him such a high price, he settled for the cheaper substitute: a lie. He disowned Jesus not because he ceased to love him but because he was afraid of the demands of relationship.

Like Peter, we want the security of slipping back into the safety of our individuality. We are terrified of solidarity and community as a way of being. We want its advantages when it suits us, and we want to be rid of it when it threatens us with suffering or responsibility. We are also afraid to be connected with Jesus as we are afraid to be connected with our fellow human beings because we know that ultimately, the two are one and the same thing. Rather than risk ourselves, we repress truth from our consciousness and refuse to see, to acknowledge, to accept the reality around us because it conflicts with our expectations.

But like Peter who wept after realizing the gravity of his denial, may we also let our own tears fill our eyes so that we may clearly see ourselves in the mirror of our relationships: As a parent, a child, a spouse, a brother, a sister, or a friend. To deny this truth of our interrelatedness is nothing other than to hate life itself, because life consists of this web of being and communion. This Holy Week, may we look into the passion of Jesus as into a mirror, and see how God and our relationships become victims of our own self-destructiveness. God suffers in the death of his Son Jesus the violence we do to ourselves whenever we deny our relationships with others.

Jesus talks about betrayal. Betrayal comes as one of the most painful human experiences, because it’s least expected. The question remains the same: How could they have lived so closed to Judas and yet, so blind to what was going on in his mind? Did they just trust him so much for His smart ideas and analytic mind? Our experience tells us that that ‘Judas’ is still very much alive today. Sometimes our external work and activities may deceive others, but certainly will never deceive God! “Not as man sees does God see, because man sees the appearance but the Lord looks into the heart,” (1Sam 16:7).

From the Wounds of Love: Those who care about others pick up a lot of wounds. They maybe no great wound, only a multiplicity of little ones, a host of scratches, wrinkles and welts. But there can also be a lot of invisible wounds; the furrow left on the mind and the heart by hardship, worry and anxiety, disappointments, ingratitude and betrayal. These wounds are not things to be ashamed of. They are badges of honor, they are the proofs of our love.

Jesus did not hide His wounds. Neither should we. By His wounds we are healed. (Fr. Romy Castro, SVD Bible Diary 2009)

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March 22, 2016 Tuesday

It must be extremely painful to be betrayed by someone who is close to you, to whom you have given your trust, to whom you have given importance. Today’s gospel brings us Jesus solemnly expressing his pain at the betrayal by one of his chosen twelve – Judas Iscariot.

In a somber mood Jesus announced to the twelve: “One of you will betray me,” (verse 21). When asked who among them, Jesus replied, “The one to whom I give the bit of food I dip in the dish,” (verse 26). For some moments the apostles were puzzled and wondered who among them would do such a thing. But their consternation was short-lived. They seemed not to take Jesus’ announcement to heart; first, maybe because sharing a morsel at table was a gesture of courtesy among the Orientals; second, maybe they were busy serving themselves food; third, they were at the same time arguing as to who was greatest or the most important among them (Luke 22:24). They were tuned out from Jesus as they were all tuned in to themselves. Thus, when Jesus handed the morsel to Judas and told him to go quickly and do what he was planning to do, they thought that Jesus told him to buy more food for the celebration or to buy something for the poor. Of course, Jesus was discreet in not mentioning the traitor’s name; but being truly human, he must have expected the group to react in alarm, anger, distress, sympathy; but what he got was “deadma”, unconcern. They were preoccupied with themselves!

The treachery of Judas coupled with the lack of concern by the eleven must have been like a double-edged sword that pierced the heart of Jesus that evening.

To sum up, three characters are presented here;

  1. Judas Iscariot whose conscience is turned into the tinkling sound of 30 pieces of silver that Satan allures him;
  2. The eleven apostles whose personal ambition for power dulls their hearts to Jesus’ call for compassion;
  3. Christ whose deeply wounded heart bleeds with mercy, compassion and forgiveness.

How about asking ourselves: To which of the three characters do we resonate most of the time? Why? (Sr. Angelita Roferos, SSpS CHS, Manila Bible Diary 2016)

rveritas-asia.org/index.php/daily-reflection/530-march-22-2016-tuesday (2016.03.23)

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Editorial

Holy Tuesday: The denial of Peter

April 6, 2009, 9:18pm

Peter’s willingness to stand up for Jesus was very evident when Jesus was arrested. John recorded it in his Gospel: Then Simon Peter, who had a sword, drew it, struck the high priest’s slave, and cut off his right ear, The slave’s name was Malchus. Jesus said to Peter, “Put your sword into its scabbard. Shall I not drink the cup that the Father gave me?” (Jn 18:10-11) So how did Peter go from a brave follower in one instant to a complete and utter coward a few hours later? A few hours after he was arrested, a maid who was the gatekeeper said to Peter, “You are not one of this man’s disciples, are you?” He said, “I am not.” …And they said to Him, “You are not one of His disciples, are you?” He denied it and said, “I am not.” One of the slaves of the high priest said, “Didn’t I see you in the garden with him?” Again Peter denied it. And immediately the cock crowed. (John 18:17-27) Thus, three times, just as Jesus had prophesied, Peter denied Jesus in the courtyard. He disowned Jesus not because he ceased to love Him but because he was afraid of the demands of relationship. Like Peter, we often want the security of slipping back into the safety of our individuality. We are terrified of solidarity and community as a way of being. We want its advantages when it suits us and we want to be rid of it when it threatens us with responsibility or suffering. We are afraid to be connected with God as we are afraid to be connected with our fellow human beings because we know that ultimately, the two are inseparable. We prefer to repress the demands of our affinities and overlook God and the people around us because they threaten our personal interests. But like Peter who wept after realizing the gravity of his denial, may we also let our own tears fill our eyes so that we may clearly see ourselves in the mirror of our relationships – as a parent, a child, a spouse, a brother, a sister, or a friend. To deny this truth of our interrelatedness is to hate life itself, because life consists of this web of being and communion. This Holy Week, may we look into the passion of Jesus as into a mirror, and see how God and our relationships become victims of our own selfish ways.

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Holy Tuesday

Gospel

April 18, 2011, 5:59pm

The Gospel today tells us that Jesus foretold that betrayal and rejection would happen to him and that the ones who would do these things to him were His very friends. “Truly, truly, I say to you, one of you will betray Me,” Jesus told His disciples (cf. John 13:21). They asked one another and then asked Jesus Himself who that disciple was. Jesus replied: “It is he to whom I shall give this morsel when I have dipped it.” And He handed the morsel to Judas Iscariot and told him: “What you are going to do, do quickly.”

Jesus then told the other disciples: “Now is the Son of man glorified, and in Him God is glorified; if God is glorified in Him, God will glorify Him in Himself, and glorify Him at once.” Peter then asked Jesus: “Lord, where are You going?” Jesus answered, saying that where He, Peter, could not follow. Peter insisted that he would follow the Lord and that he would lay down his life for Him. At this, Jesus warned him that he, Peter, would deny Him three times before the cock crowed.

There are times when we are like Judas and Peter. How many times have we betrayed Jesus and clung instead to the allurements that this world offers? How many times have we prioritized power, prestige, and possessions rather than following the way of Jesus? How many times have we gone our own way instead of walking the path of righteousness and justice? How many times have we rejected the call of the Lord to love Him with all our heart and might? How many times we refused His invitation to be reconciled with God?

This Holy Week is an opportune time for us to turn away from our ways and turn back to God who loved us and continues to love us in spite of what we have done. The Sacrament of Reconciliation will make us realize our sinfulness and will bring us back to God’s embrace.

Let us not miss out on the opportunity to meet the Lord in this sacrament and be renewed with His grace and love.

mb.com.ph/articles/314683/holy-tuesday

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HOLY TUESDAY: MODERN-DAY SLAVERY – “I will make you a light to the nations, that my salvation may reach to the ends of the earth.” – Isaiah 49:6

I read recently that there are an estimated 27 million slaves around the world today. Most of these are women who are being exploited for sexual labor against their will. The average age of trafficking victims is 12 years old. They are recruited with a false promise of a job and are coerced into prostitution. In secret centers they are raped, beaten, threatened (for their lives or their family’s), slapped with exorbitant debt, extremely maltreated, and sold to paying customers. This is a booming industry that makes about $12 billion worldwide, run by ruthless and powerful multinational criminal networks with a Philippine presence.

Sickening but real. This evil is present in our world today. It’s high time we open our eyes to its realities and save those held captive by this darkness.

Friend, you and I are called to illuminate the darkest places of this world with the light of Christ, to shine His light not just in places that are already well lit, but more so, in places consumed by utter darkness. Let’s do something about this. Let’s fight and be a light! Mike Viñas (mikemichaelfcv@yahoo.com)

Reflection: Seek a local or global organization fighting against sex trafficking and get involved.

Father, allow Your light to radiate through me to reach the darkest of dens and defeat evil.

kerygmafamily.com/modules/dailyreadings/read.php?date=2014-04-15

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1ST READING: Sometimes it may seem that our labors for the Kingdom of God are in vain. However, if we are following God’s will, we can be sure that it will never be the case. We may not understand the fullness of what God is doing through us but we should always trust that He does. Suffering is especially difficult to understand but it is an integral part of the redemption that Jesus won for us. Isaiah 49:1-6

GOSPEL: Jesus knows that one of His own will betray Him to the authorities. He even knows who the person is but He does not banish him from His presence. He gives him the possibility of repentance and a change of heart. We know this was a vain hope but we should learn from the example of Jesus and allow others the same hope and chance in their relationship with us.John 13:21-33, 36-38

think:  Suffering is especially difficult to understand but it is an integral part of the redemption that Jesus won for us.

kerygmafamily.com/modules/dailyreadings/read.php?date=2014-04-15

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AND IT WAS NIGHT: It is interesting to note how Jesus, in His talk with His circle of disciples, was so discreet. Even as He revealed His knowledge about a treachery that was about to happen with one of His disciples, He was careful not to name Judas. Hence, Judas had a last chance to redeem himself and change his plans. Jesus gave Judas all the graces and all the respect. Judas had freedom of choice until the end.

The sad thing, though, is this: Judas chose to persist in his evil plan. He paid no attention to the grace being extended to him. Without any hint of repentance, he went on and he went out — with the silence of a stubborn, defiant and recalcitrant fellow. He rejected the goodwill being extended to him by his Master.

John the evangelist dramatically indicates everything with a short but powerful verse: “And it was night.” Jesus had spoken of Himself as “the Way, the Truth and the Life” (John 14:6). Furthermore, He indicates that He is the True Light. He said: “I came into the world as a light, so that everyone who believes in me might not remain in darkness” (John 12:46).

Judas chose the darkness. Fr. Domie Guzman, SSP

REFLECTION QUESTIONS: What events and experiences in your life can you also liken to “night” and “darkness”? Jesus is the True Light. What does this personally mean for you?

Help me to always cling to You as my True Light, Lord. Dispel whatever darkness comes into my life.

kerygmafamily.com/modules/dailyreadings/read.php?date=2014-04-15

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My Reflection for April 15, Tuesday of Holy Week – Reflection: Have you been betrayed already? How did you feel? You felt bad, you felt anger and disappointment toward the person who betrayed you.

When Jesus was betrayed by Judas he felt bad and disappointed same perhaps when He was disowned by Peter not once, not twice but three times. But after all has been said and done Jesus forgave them all. When Jesus was dying on the cross He said: “Father forgive them for they do not know what they do (Luke 23:34).”

To be betrayed and disowned by those whom we thought are not capable of doing it to us is something that is very hard for many of us to accept. But that’s life, that’s how many of us are. When we are faced by evil temptations disguised as attractive things of this world we easily embrace betrayal.

For example in Sacrament of Marriage, how many times have we betrayed our sacred wows for those fleeting self gratification? Not knowing the vast consequence that may befall us. Nevertheless Jesus has forgiven us also. When Jesus said on the cross: “Father forgive them for they do not know what they do (Luke 23:34).” He was not only referring to those who denied and betrayed Him during that time of His passion. He was also referring to us who are easily swayed by the many temptations of the devil.

But we must think hard and finally decide to stop our betrayal of Jesus in the many aspects of our lives. Otherwise we may not know what may befall us.

On this Tuesday of Holy Week let us think about the many betrayals that we’ve made to Jesus. The many betrayals that we’ve made inside the sacrament of marriage. And let us ask for forgiveness from Jesus and to those whom we have offended.  (Marino J. Dasmarinas)

mjdasma.blogspot.com/2014/04/my-reflection-for-april-15-tuesday-of.html

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Tuesday, March 22, 2016

Reflection for March 22, Tuesday of Holy Week; John 13:21-33, 36-38

Reflection: Have you been betrayed already? How did you feel? You felt bad of course; you felt anger and disappointment toward the person who betrayed you.

When Jesus was betrayed by Judas he felt bad and disappointed same perhaps when He was disowned by Peter not once, not twice but three times! However, after all had been said and done Jesus forgave them all. When Jesus was dying on the cross He said: “Father forgive them for they do not know what they do (Luke 23:34).”

To be betrayed and disowned by those whom we thought were not capable of doing it to us is something that is very hard to accept. But that’s life, that’s how many of us are when we are tempted by the devil disguised as an attractive person we easily embrace betrayal.

For example in Sacrament of Marriage, how many times have we betrayed our sacred wows for those fleeting self-gratification? Not knowing the immense consequence that will befall us.

Betrayal initially starts in the mind when we conjure images of the person who attracts us. Until he/she completely captures us, yet betrayal is not an act by the person alone. It is an act by the devil feed to the mind of the person. And when the person has weak faith he/she naturally succumbs to the evil scheming of the devil until it completely destroy the person.

When Jesus said on the cross: “Father forgive them for they do not know what they do (Luke 23:34).” He was not only referring to those who denied and betrayed Him during that time of His passion. He was also referring to us who are easily swayed by the many temptations of the devil.

In this Tuesday of Holy Week let us think about the many betrayals that we’ve made to Jesus. The many betrayals that we’ve made inside the Sacrament of Marriage/Matrimony. Let us beg for healing and forgiveness from Jesus. And lest we forget let us also beg for forgiveness and restoration from the person whom we have betrayed. – Marino J. Dasmarinas

mjdasma.blogspot.com/2016/03/reflection-for-march-22-tuesday-of-holy.html

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Jesus talks about Betrayal: The surprising thing about Judas plan to betray Jesus is that the other disciples had no idea of it.

How could they have lived so close to Judas and been so blind to what was going on in his mind?

There are two lessons here:

First, our external words and actions may deceive others, but they will never deceive God.

Second, the day will come when everyone will know what is in our heart. For it is a law of human nature that what is in our heart will eventually usher forth into action.

Do we really believe that God knows our innermost thoughts? What effect ought this to have on us?

“Not as man sees does God see, because man sees the appearance but the Lord looks into the heart.” 1Sam 16:7 (Fr. Mark Link, SJ, Illustrated Daily Homilies Seasons and Feasts, Mumbai 1997:152)

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March 22, 2016

REFLECTION:

In the David-Goliath episode we read two days ago, some verses were omitted for the sake of brevity (1 S 17:34-36). In those verses we learn that as a shepherd David would attack any lion or bear which preyed on his sheep. This he did many times and every time at the risk of his life. Thus we saw that David was a man of strong character. But today’s episode shows him to be more than that. It shows him to be a man of noble character, ever respectful of the divine order of things and unwilling to seek personal revenge. Here he is, a man on the run with 3,000 first-class soldiers hunting him down. He can end it all with one single thrust of his sword into the heart of Saul, his arch-enemy. But he resists the temptation and lets Saul go scot-free. Even Saul has to bow before such greatness of heart: “You are right and I am wrong,” he admits in the end.

To forgive an enemy is not only to obey a strict commandment of Christ (Mt 5:43-48). It is also to escape the dreary cycle of hate and to emerge into greatness of soul.

CLARETIAN COMMUNICATIONS FOUNDATION, INC.

8 Mayumi Street, U.P. Village, Diliman, 1101 Quezon City, Philippines

Tel.: (02) 921-3984, 922-9806 • Fax: (02) 921-6205

schoolofthewordonline.com/scriptural-library/daily-gospel/english/item/3480-march-22-2016

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Monday, March 21, 2016

HOLY TUESDAY (YEAR C) – JUAN 13:21-33, 36-38. UNSA MAY ANGAY NATONG BUHATON KON KITA MAKAAMGO SA ATONG PAGKAMASALAYPON? Ang pagbudhi ni Judas kang Kristo gihinuklogan ug giplano; samtang ang kang Pedro bunga sa iyang kahuyang ug kalisang samtang siya nagsud-ong sa gisakit niyang Ginoo. Sa dihang nakaamgo sila sa kangil-ad sa ilang nabuhat, si Judas nawad-an dayon og paglaum ug naghikog; si Pedro nagbasol ug naglaum sa pasaylo nga ihatag sa Ginoo. Ning panahon sa Kwaresma, kita gipahinumduman sa atong pagkamakasasala ug gi-awhag nga maghinulsol. Si Pedro, dili si Judas, maoy atong sundon. Dili kita angay nga mawad-ag paglaom sa atong kaugalingong kaluwasan. Sakto ang panultihon: “No matter how far wrong you’ve gone, you can always turn around.” Hinumdumi nga aduna kitay Dios nga maluluy-on ug mapasayloon. Posted by Abet Uy

abetuy.blogspot.com/2016/03/holy-tuesday-year-c.html

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See Today’s Readings:  Year I,  Year II

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