Baptism of the Lord (B)

Is 42:1-4,6-7; Acts 10:34-38; Mk 1:7-11

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES:

Baptism of the Lord – On the Gospel

Isaiah 52:1-11

1 John 5:1-9

Mark 1:7-11

Fr Munachi E. Ezeogu, cssp

The RICE of Baptism

 In Nigeria the baptism of a child is usually followed by a happy reception where children are sure to eat one thing, rice. As a result, the baptism dress is sometimes referred to as your rice dress. Thinking of baptism easily makes people think of rice. And sometimes when you are talking of the rites of baptism, all they hear is the rice of baptism. Though the connection between baptism and rice is altogether accidental, one can utilise it as a memory aid for the meaning of baptism.

What does baptism mean? The meaning of baptism can be found in the four letters of the word RICE. R stands for Rebirth. In baptism we are born again by water and the Holy Spirit. We are cleansed from original sin and become sons and daughters of God in a special way. I stands for Initiation. At baptism we are initiated or admitted into full membership in the church, the community of the children of God in the world. C is for Consecration. In baptism we consecrate and dedicate ourselves to seek and to spread the kingdom of God. We commit ourselves to be servants of God, to do God’s will and serve God with our whole lives. And E is for Empowerment. At baptism the Holy Spirit comes into our lives and empowers us, equips us, gives us the moral strength to say no to evil and to live as God’s children that we have become.

These four effects of baptism can be divided into two categories, the passive effects (what we receive from God and the people of God), namely, rebirth, initiation, and empowerment; and the active effect (what we give to God and the people of God), namely, our commitment and dedication to a cause, to spread the kingdom of God. One problem people have with today’s gospel is to understand why Jesus needed to be baptized. An understanding of the “rice” of baptism as we have tried to explain can help.

Looking at the baptism of Jesus by John in the Jordan, we find that Jesus did not need a rebirth since he was from all eternity the only begotten child of God. He had no original sin to be cleansed from. Did Jesus need initiation? Yes. Being human, Jesus needed to associate and to identify with the community of men and women who were dedicated to promoting the cause of the kingdom of God. When it comes to serving God, no one is an island. We need to interact with other children of God. We need the community of faith just as Jesus did. We need the church. Empowerment: the Holy Spirit is the power of the Most High. The Spirit that descended on Jesus at his baptism strengthened and empowered him. It was at his baptism that “God anointed Jesus of Nazareth with the Holy Spirit and with power; [and] he went about doing good and healing all who were oppressed by the devil” (Acts 10:37-38). Consecration: Baptism for Jesus was a moment of self-consecration, a moment of self-dedication. For him it was a commitment to do whatever was necessary to promote the cause of the kingdom of God on earth.

We read that soon after Jesus’ baptism, John was arrested and the Kingdom of God movement needed a new leadership. When Jesus heard it he went up and took on the task, in this way implementing the commitment he made at his baptism to promote the kingdom of God. We can see that for Jesus baptism was not just a question of what he could receive but very much a question of what he could contribute to the cause of the kingdom of God on earth. John F. Kennedy’s saying, “Ask not what your country can do for you, rather ask what you can do for your country” can also be applied to our relationship with God and the Church.

What are we doing, each one of us, to promote the kingdom of God? Are we ready to consecrate and dedicate ourselves wholly to the service of the kingdom of God just as Jesus did? If not, what are we doing to support those who have consecrated themselves to doing this work in the name of us all? Let us today with Jesus renew our baptismal commitment to bear witness to the Good News of the kingdom of God in word and in deed.

************************************************************************

Baptism of the Lord – On the Epistle

Isaiah 52:1-11

1 John 5:1-9

Mark 1:7-11

Fr Munachi E. Ezeogu, cssp

The Test of True Love

 There is a story of a wealthy man who had a double tragedy. His wife died in childbirth and the boy that she gave birth to was mentally handicapped. He hired a nurse to take care of the child. The nurse raised the child like her own son. The boy, however, died in his early teens. Heartbroken, the rich man died soon after. The man’s will could not be found and so the state decided to put the man’s estate and belongings up for sale. The old nurse had very little money and there was one thing she wanted more than any other – a framed photo of the boy she had nursed and loved. No one else wanted the picture, so she got it for just one dollar. She took the picture home and began to clean it up. As she did so, a piece of paper fell out from the wooden frame. It was the rich man’s will. It stated that all his wealth and estate would go to anyone who loved his son enough to buy his picture. The sales were halted and everything was returned to the nurse, whose dedication to the boy was happily rewarded.

Many Christians include in their new year resolutions to grow in their relationship with God. They resolve to serve God more faithfully, to grow in God’s love. What is often lacking is such resolutions is an equal determination to improve our relationship with our neighbours, to grow in our love for others. In today’s 2nd reading from the 1st Letter of John, we are told that love of God and love of neighbour are two sides of the same coin. We cannot have the one without having the other also.

John begins by reminding us of the mystery that took place when we believed. By believing in Christ we became children of God. By baptism into Christ we became sons and daughter of a large family, the family of God. From that moment on, God became our father in a special way, and all other children of God became our brothers and sisters. Each time we say that special prayer of God’s children, the Our Father, we are in effect saying that God’s chilren everywhere are our brothers and sisters. Just as it is hypocritical to say we love a parent without loving his or her child, so it is hypocritical to profess love of God without equally professing love for all of God’s children.

Everyone who believes that Jesus is the Christ has been born of God, and everyone who loves the parent loves the child” (1 John 5:1).

A man who wants to befirend a woman has little chance of success if he does not also befirend her dog, not to talk of her child, if she has any. In the same way, our chances of getting along with God are slim if we are not ready to associate with any of God’s children, our own brothers and sisters in the one family of God.

We have mentioned one set of hypocrites, namely, those who say they love God without making any effort to love their fellow children of God. There is another set of hypocrites, those who claim to love their fellow human beings while shutting themselves off from a personal love of God. People like that may be models of philanthropy but not of Christian love. True Christian love must have both vertical and horizontal dimensions. As John tells us, the test for a genuine love of neighbour is when the one who claims to love neighbour also strives to love God and obey God’s commandment.

By this we know that we love the children of God, when we love God and obey his commandments” (1 John 5:2).

In baptism we committed ourselves to serving God and obeying His commandments. As we celebrate the Baptism of Our Lord, today, we are reminded of the greatest of all of God’s commandments, which we vowed to keep.

“You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your mind.” 38 This is the greatest and first commandment. 39 And a second is like it: “You shall love your neighbor as yourself.” 40 On these two commandments hang all the law and the prophets (Mathew 22:37-40).

*************************************************************************

Moments
Honesty and humility

By Fr. Jerry Orbos
Philippine Daily Inquirer
First Posted 00:24:00 01/11/2009

SOME years ago I boarded an air-conditioned Baguio City-bound bus in Urdaneta, Pangasinan. Imagine my surprise when I saw all the people at the back straining their necks looking at me as I walked down the aisle. I must have even bowed or smiled at them, only to find out that I was actually blocking the TV monitor behind me!

* * *

In today’s Gospel (Mk. 1, 7-11) John proclaimed: “One mightier than I am is coming after me.” John knew and accepted who he was, and what his role was. He did not pretend to be what he was not, neither did he entertain ambitions of greatness. Honesty and humility are what we need so much these days. A lot of our personal and communal problems can be solved if we had these virtues.

* * *

It would be good today, on the Feast of the Baptism of the Lord, to ask ourselves: “Is the Father pleased with me, and the life I am living now?” Perhaps if we all started to focus on pleasing the Father, and stopped focusing on pleasing ourselves and pleasing others, then can we really move on. We need a few good men and women who have the courage to say and to do what is right and what is noble to start a moral revolution which is so much needed in our country right now.

* * *

Maj. Ferdinand Marcelino, a Marine officer detailed at the Philippine Drug Enforcement Agency (PDEA) as head of its enforcement division showed the nation that with truthfulness and humility, one can stand up against anything or anyone. How uplifting and heartwarming to hear the words of a truthful and humble man. In contrast, how boring and how disgusting it was to hear the words of cheaters, pretenders and liars.

* * *

We miss the point when we put so much emphasis on the office or the position of a person rather on the person holding the office or the position. Major Marcelino has shown us that being good and doing good are what really count. In fact, we need not hold positions or offices to be good and to do good. How often have we been fooled by politicians and government leaders who seek a position so that they can “serve our people”? Hello! Please don’t do self-service in the guise of public service.

* * *

We just had the annual procession of the Black Nazarene. Amid all the emotions and devotions, let us not forget the message of the whole celebration, which is, sacrifice. The Lord is telling us that the road to true life is the road of sacrifice, the way of the cross. Let us ask ourselves today: Am I on the way of the cross? Am I the cross for others on the way?

* * *

Think about it: “Always be the reason for someone’s happiness and never be just a part of it; be a part of someone’s sadness, but never be the reason for it.”

* * *

By virtue of our baptism, we are all disciples of Christ. We must not keep our faith. We must share it! Recently, I have been sharing the faith with a German national who has problems with alcohol and depression. I prayed with him in earnest, and gave him a scapular which he wears up to now. Recently, the Filipina wife told me that there has been a lot of healing and transformation. To God be the glory!

* * *

Also recently, a Japanese national came to me for counseling. He had been abandoned by his Filipina wife. He had a lot of questions regarding God and why he is going through so much pain and suffering. At times, we can really give no answers. All we can do is listen, and somehow point to the Big Picture. And just be there.

* * *

I had done it before, but the other night, I found myself in tears as I was spoon-feeding my 87-year-old Mama. Perhaps because she was down with a bum stomach and fever, and she was so weak, she was so obedient, doing whatever I told her to do, like a little child, and I was reminded that I too was once her little child. Actually, the tears were tears of gratitude for being given the chance and the opportunity to somehow return the love and care she gave me. By the way, honesty and humility were the constant lessons we received from Papa and Mama.

* * *

PHILIPPINE SVD CENTENNIAL MOMENT: Did you know that the very first comet discovered in the Philippines was discovered by Fr. Leo Boethin, SVD? This simple, jovial and hardworking missionary spent so much of the night gazing at the stars with his simple telescope. So simple was he that he sent his discovery via airmail and not by telegram. So simple was he that when he received the “Padre Faura Astronomy Award” on Oct. 26, 1975, he came in a borrowed “barong Tagalog” because he had none.

* * *

A moment with the Lord:

As we face the new year ahead, we pray: Lord, we don’t know what the future holds, but we know that you hold the future in your hands, and that is enough. Amen.

***********************************************************************

Christmas is every day

By Fr. Bel R. San Luis, SVD

ONCE a priest, celebrating midnight Mass before a jampacked congregation which included numerous new faces, said, “Merry Christmas and Happy Easter!”

* * *

The people wondered why he included Easter. After the Mass, the priest explained, “It’s because the next time they will show up in church again will be on Easter.”

* * *

The priest was referring to seasonal Christians who attend Church services only at Christmas and Easter, the “C & E churchgoers.”

* * *

The joyous and long season of Christmas ends today, feast of the Baptism of Christ. It is hoped that Christians are not active only during the Christmas season.

So we ask: Will the spirit of Christmas die down? Concretely, will the spirit of generosity like reaching out to the less fortunate, the spirit of forgiveness and reconciliation, the spirit of peace end?

* * *

As we would say, “Christmas is every day.” “But that would be expensive. We would have to buy gifts and throw parties,” someone might say.

By no means. What’s meant is the spirit or attitude.

* * *

Why should we think of the indigents only on Christmas? Why should we have peace and yes, political and military ceasefire only during this season? Why not a permanent ceasefire?

* * *

It does not cost much to live the Christmas spirit. It can be expressed in non-material ways like a well-deserved compliment or an appreciative word, reaching out to a co-worker weighed down with a heavy problem, remembering long-lost relatives or being more patient and understanding of other’s weaknesses.

* * *

The spirit of Christmas is actually the spirit of a true Christian. And being a true Christian should not be seasonal but a whole-year-round practice, a lifetime endeavor.

* * *

An unknown poet puts it beautifully thus: “When the song of the angels is stilled, when the star in the sky is gone, when the kings and princes are home, when the shepherds are back with the flocks, the work of Christmas begins.

* * *

“To find the lost, to heal the broken-hearted, to feed the hungry, to release the prisoner, to rebuild the nations, to bring peace among brothers, to make music with the heart.”

* * *

THE LIGHTER SIDE. There was once a woman who brought her child for baptism. “What’s the baby’s name?” asked the parish priest. “Toyota,” said the mother.

Taken aback the priest said, “Why?”

* * *

Kasi po Father,” she replied, “iyong panganay ko ay nagngangalang ‘Ford,’ yong ikalawa naman ay ‘Mercedes’ at yong pinakamaliit ay ‘Beetle.’”

A ganoon ba? Bueno, ano ang gusto mong ibibinyag ko sa anak mo: Diesel o gasolina?”

* * *

A man went to a doctor to ask how he could stop his lust for women.

Doctor said sympathetically: “That’s natural for healthy man, but you can control it by devoting your life to the church and to God.

The man said: “Doc, I am already doing that…I am a priest!” (Priests and even bishops are only human).

* * *

SHARE. Start the New Year right. Be generous. Share your blessings and God will bless you all the more.

************************************************************************

Feast of the Baptism of our Lord: May we be Christs to others

Manila Bulletin 2009

 TODAY marks the Feast of the Baptism of our Lord. This feast brings to an end the joyous Christmas season in the Liturgical Calendar of the Church. This is the occasion where the Father affirmed His only begotten Son by saying, “This is my Son, the Beloved, with whom I am well pleased.’’

In Catholic theology, this is the first manifestation of the saving love of the Triune God for humanity and a show of the unity of the Trinity. Aside from the voice of the Father that was heard from above, in the Matthean account of the Baptism of Jesus, the heavens opened and Jesus saw the Spirit of God descending like a dove upon Him. After the Baptism of Jesus in the River Jordan by John the Baptist (cf. Luke 3:15-17, 21-22; Matthew 3:13-7; Mark 1:4-11; John 1:29-34), Jesus commenced his public ministry in Galilee.

This is an opportune time for us to look back at our own baptism. All of us who have been baptized in Christ Jesus must not only remember the graces and merits we have received in baptism. We must also carry out our responsibilities as true Christians.

In the words of Paul, the apostle, in baptism, “It is no longer I who live, but Christ who lives in me.’’ (cf. Galatians 2:20). Baptism is the beginning of our life in Christ Jesus. Let us then keep ourselves clean, reject all temptations of the evil one, and live a holy life. Holiness is God’s challenge and our responsibility. Let us allow ourselves to be used by God to fulfill his promise of salvation to all.

Like Jesus who emptied Himself and gave His life totally to the proclamation of the Kingdom of God, we, too, must embrace the same commitment and entrust ourselves to the mission of evangelization. This we can do as ordinary Christians by witnessing to the Gospel values everywhere and at all times.

As the Catholic Church today enters the Ordinary Season, may we all strive to live as good Christians, always mindful of God’s ever abiding presence, even in the ordinariness of our daily lives. May all of us who have been baptized in Christ be living “Christs’’ to others. Happy Feast of the Baptism of our Lord!

*************************************************************************

What our baptism means

By FR. BEL R. SAN LUIS, SVD

ONE time three pastors were discussing about cats invading their churches. The Baptist minister said he put the cats in bags and threw them in a nearby river. In spite of that, the cats survived and there were twice as many there the next week.

* * *

The Methodist minister said they were not in a position to harm any of God’s creation. So he confided they humanely trapped the cats and set them free many miles outside town. But three days later, the cats were back.

* * *

But the Catholic priest bragged that he had the best and most effective solution. He said, “I simply baptized them and I haven’t seen them in church since then!”

Obviously, that’s just a joke but it illustrates a sad reality that after baptism many Christians are never seen in church again.

* * *

This Sunday we commemorate the baptism of the Lord. What’s the significance of Jesus’ baptism? First, it declares WHO he is — God’s own Son (“This is My beloved Son. On You My favor rests” (Mk 1:11).

* * *

Second, it declares what He will do. This is expressed by the prophet Isaiah in the first reading of this Sunday. His mission as God’s Servant was to bring justice to the nations, open the eyes of the blind, to release captives free (Is 42:1-4, 6-7).

* * *

Similarly, our own baptism means two things. It not only proclaims publicly our new membership of the Church, but also empowers us to DO the good works Jesus did.

* * *

It is to the immense credit of our Filipino Christian parents that they take to heart the baptism of their children (even if some have to borrow money to spend for a baptismal party!). It seems, however, that there is a lack of follow-up afterwards.

* * *

For instance, many baptized kids grow up grossly ignorant of religious instructions and their duties as Christians. In effect, they grow up as nominal Christians or Christians in name only.

Somebody called these “KBL Christians” (Kasal, Binyag, Libing). They go to church only three times in their lives — when baptized, married, buried. Or, as an Englishman put it: “When they are ‘hatched, matched, and dispatched’ (to the cemeteries or crematoriums).”

* * *

The theologian Bernard Cooke in his book Christian Sacraments and Christian Personality writes: “Our baptism is not an action which happens once and has no further significance for our life. Rather, all the significance of this sacrament passes dynamically into the daily living of the Christian.”

* * *

Briefly, the author is saying: It is not enough that we accept baptism passively as something done to us. We must also allow it to become an operative power impelling us to act as Christ did.

* * *

Concretely, what that means for us today includes services like volunteering our help in parish projects; joining some religious organizations that reach out to the less fortunate; showing sympathy to the bereaved; or witnessing as a good Christian family man or government official by exemplifying the moral values of justice, honesty, and integrity.

* * *

I have a friend, Judge Maximiano Savellano, who retired after years of sterling service as an executive judge of Manila. He takes to heart his Catholic faith, reading the Bible regularly, organizing religious activities in his office.

* * *

Moreover, he confided to me that he would lecture to young lawyers to shun corrupt practices in their profession. One of them was so moved by his exhortation that he reverently bowed and kissed his hand — thinking he was a bishop! (Well, at his age, he looked more like an archbishop!).

* * *

This executive judge understands well that the task of evangelization belongs not only to bishops and priests but also to all baptized Christians. Moreover, the calling of every baptized Christian does not mean just avoiding sin but also doing good works and concerned for the good of others who are straying.

* * *

Ask yourself: As a baptized Christian, are you aware of your duties and responsibilities? Do you consider Sunday Mass going only as your Christian duty or do you also contribute your three Ts (Time, Talent, and Treasure) as part of your baptismal commitment?

May the baptism of the Lord remind us of our calling and duties as baptized Christians and fulfill them.

***********************************************************************

FEAST OF THE LORD’S BAPTISM

Mk 1: 7-11

MY FIRST EXPERIENCE of administering the sacrament of baptism took place in a big parish Church where Sunday baptisms are in big numbers. The Church was filled up and each pew was assigned with one candidate for baptism. With the candidate were parents and godparents. For practical reasons, the said parish no longer uses the baptismal font for the pouring of water. Instead, I was told by the parish priest to simply sprinkle water on each candidate. When I did that, I could not contain my laughter because it appeared I was blessing a number of motorbikes, not infants.
The baptism of Jesus by John in the river Jordan is worth reflecting. There are three important moments in Jesus’ baptism by John as related to us in the version St Mark of the passage. First, is John’s humble recognition of his baptism as less superior compared to the baptism to be given by Jesus. His is baptism of water while Jesus’, a baptism of the Spirit. Second, the actual baptism of Jesus by John. Third, the Father’s affirmation on the act of Jesus through a voice.

First, let us reflect on the person of John. John was very much aware of his role in relation to the coming of Christ. He looked at Jesus as someone who is Mightier than him and that the baptism He will give is baptism of the Spirit, compared to his baptism of water. In those days, John became popular and famous through his preaching and call for repentance. Yet, John did not use his fame and popularity to his personal advantage. He saw himself as insignificant compared to the One who is to come. He felt even unworthy.

Second, speaking of humility, the baptism of Jesus in the river Jordan was also a mark of humility. Like those people who came to John for baptism, Jesus also immersed in the water. He could not have done it, but, Jesus decided purposely to associate himself with sinners and to assume the burden of our sins. He chose to have a share in our life, and to die as well so that we may live. The baptism of Jesus may be seen as his first act of his public ministry and this act suggests humility. The practice of immersion is something to be reconsidered nowadays. There is a rich symbolism in the rite It would be a lot easier for people to see the sharing “in the dying and rising of Christ” through immersion than merely “sprinkling” the candidates of baptism with water.

Third, the affirmation of the Father. There was a seal of approval on the part of the Father because as soon as Jesus came out from the water, the heaven unlocked with the voice: “You are my beloved Son; with you I am well pleased.” This could have been an external sign that Jesus was truly appointed by the Father to be the Savior of humanity. Indeed, He was sent to save us.

The Feast of the Lord’s Baptism is also an occasion for us to go over our own baptism. This could be more urgent especially now that baptism has been reduced to a social occasion, devoid of its spiritual meaning. We need to go back to the true sense of this sacrament. Although Jesus’ baptism cannot be understood as a call to conversion because He is sinless, our baptism, in contrast, is a call to conversion. When John called people to baptism, it was widely seen as a call to repentance. If Christ baptizes us in the Spirit, then, God’s Spirit takes possession of us in a very special way. The Spirit then directs us in the footsteps of Christ. In the final analysis, baptism unites us with Christ.

Baptism is a call to conversion. In fact, the fruits of baptism, in the Pauline sense, are “new existence” (Gal 2:20); “new creation” (2 Cor 13:5); and “freedom” (Gal 4:1-5). These are distinguishing marks of people who believe in Christ. These are also gifts we receive when we were baptized and this is signified by the white cloth that we wore. Through baptism, we receive a new existence. We distance ourselves from our old sinful life. Likewise, baptism in Christ makes us a “new creation,” a new being. Furthermore, baptism in Christ makes us “free” persons, we are no longer slaves.

msp.org.ph/homilies.do?id=19682

***********************************************************************************

Our baptism needs follow-up

by Fr. Bel R. San Luis, SVD
January 9, 2015

A priest about to baptize a child asked the father: “What’s the name of the baby?” Ramon, the father, replied: “Surf.”

* * *

Visibly peeved the priest said: “That can’t be. That’s the name of a soap.” Pete countered: “But Father, my wife is Perla and my son is Ariel.”

Priest: “OK, what do you want me to use to baptize your child? Downy or Zonrox?”

* * *

That folksy anecdote might help focus attention on the feast of Christ’s baptism which we celebrate this Sunday and the secularized way parents name their children nowadays.

* * *

When the Lord waded into the River Jordan and was baptized by John, the sacrament of baptism was inaugurated. Before ascending to heaven, Jesus made baptism a mandate, saying, “Go…make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit” (Mt 28,15).

* * *

It is to the immense credit of Christian parents that they take to heart the baptism of their children.

It seems, however, that many baptized children grow up grossly ignorant of

religious instructions and their obligations as Christians.

* * *

In effect, many turn out to be baptized Christians in name only. Then there are Christians who come to church three times in their whole lifetime–when baptized, married, buried, or when “hatched, matched, dispatched.” (In those instances, they are carried to church, except when married, of course).

* * *

The theologian Bernard Cooke in his book Christian Sacraments and Christian Personality writes: “Our baptism is not an action which happens once and has no further significance for our life. Rather, all the significance of this sacrament passes dynamically into the daily living of the Christian.”

* * *

In other words, it is not enough for us just to accept baptism passively or as something done to us. There must be a follow-up. Our baptism should become an operative power impelling us to act as Christ did.

* * *

The absence of this “operative power” of baptism engenders a piety that’s split between faith and practice in day-to-day life.

For instance, we pride ourselves as the only Christian country in Asia yet ironically we have a high level of crime and violence which involves even law enforcers.

* * *

Then graft and corruption continue to thrive. There are many reasons behind these social maladies but one could be that our Christian faith and morals have not really permeated and influenced the various spheres of our life.

* * *

Once I was trying to settle the quarrel between two feuding relatives. “Let’s forgive one another,” I appealed, “because Christ told us to forgive.”

The lady shot back with a reply that almost floored me: “Father, puede ba, huwag natin isali ang Diyos sa usapan na ito!” (Father, please, let’s not include God in this talk!).

* * *

Baptismal faith should grow and mature. If we have that kind of faith, then our heavenly Father will say what He said to His Son Jesus when He was baptized, “This is my beloved son/daughter in whom I am well pleased.”

mb.com.ph/our-baptism-needs-follow-up/

*************************************************************************************

See Today’s Readings:  Year B

Back to: Baptism of the Lord (Year B)

This entry was posted in zz. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s