Thursday of the 2nd Week of Lent

Luke 16:19-31

The Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES:

A certain man fell into a big, big hole. At different intervals four people passed by and were really intent on helping him. The first man who passed by and saw him started to scold him. The second man who passed advised him to forget his condition through some techniques. The third one called for somebody else to bring aid to the hapless man out of the pit. A fourth one went down to help him out.

The fourth character reflects the total commitment of Christ who really went down to lift man out from a sinful condition. Was it really necessary that he go down to suffer so much with man? No, if He did not love us. Yes, because He loves us infinitely. His loving commitment to help man is the opposite of the attitude of Dives towards Lazarus. Lazarus the poor man, full of sores and very sick, was starving to death as he waited for the crumbs that fell from Dives’ table. Dives, the wealthy man, is a picture of indolence and self-indulgence. His sin was that of a man who did not notice the sad plight of the poor. His sin was one of omission.

As an SVD missionary, I served some tribals for over ten years in Mindoro. These are the Mangyans who form with others over 120 tribal groups in the whole Philippines.

In spite of the missionaries’ years of evangelizing efforts, only about ten percent is Christian. The majority remains unbelieving. Why? According to them, it is the Christians who cheat, grab their lands, kill them, and destroy the mountains. They continue to ask: “Why is your life against the teachings of the God of Love you preach and teach?” (Fr. Joel Maribao, SVD Bible Diary 2002)

**************************************************************************

I heard of a businessman in Midwest, USA, who had anonymously given away more than $600 million to universities, medical centers, charitable institutions and other beneficiaries over the past fifteen years. When on account of some legal proceedings his identity was known, a friend described him as a man who does not even own a house or a car, flies economy class and wears a $15 wristwatch. He explained his generosity in plain words by saying: “I decided I had enough money and I thought it best to share it for the good of many who could not benefit from it. Anyone when we die, we cannot bring anything to heaven.” He is no fool who gives what he cannot keep to gain what he cannot lose.”

In contrast, the rich man in the gospel concerned himself only with fine clothes and feasted everyday. He was neither indifferent to the needs of others nor did he care to neither show mercy nor extend help to the poor and sick man Lazarus. He failed to see beyond self, beyond earthly existence. He did not take wealth as God’s gift and that its true value is not in keeping it for self alone, but in using it for the benefit of others. If our own comfort and pleasure in this earthly life are all that matter, all our efforts and energies will be invested in personal gain which is worthless as discovered by the rich man upon seeing Lazarus at rest with Abraham. He was not condemned because he was wealthy but because he was uncaring and insensitive. In this connection, it is apt to quote the Prophet Jeremiah’s words of wisdom in the first reading when he wrote, “I, Yahweh, search the heart and penetrate the mind. I reward each one according to his ways and the fruit of his deed.” For indeed the Lord who said, “whatever you do to the least of my brothers, you do it to me,” sees through the depths of our heart.

The paradox of the kingdom is that what we have is not our real treasure but what we give away. God is constantly inviting us to look into our hearts, to look beyond our selfish concerns in order to see the essentials in life. Can we afford to exchange eternity for some moment of pleasure? The choice is ours! (SSpSAP Bible Diary 2004)

************************************************************************

February 25, 2016 Thursday

Pope Francis has “disturbed” many of us with his simplicity and prophetic message. In Evangelii Gaudium (The Joy of the Gospel), he says: “I want a Church which is poor and for the poor. They (the poor) have much to teach us. In their difficulties they know the suffering Christ. We need to let ourselves be evangelized by them. We are called to nd Christ in them, to lend our voice to their causes, but also to be their friends, to listen to them, to speak for them and to embrace the mysterious wisdom which God wishes to share with us through them.”

In the parable that Jesus addresses to the Pharisees, the rich man heartlessly ignored the poor man Lazarus. Perhaps he believed that, with all his riches, he had everything he needed in life. He was complete. He did not need anything from the poor man. It was the poor man who needed his help. But in the end, the parable teaches us that the rich man’s self-sufficiency and indifference prevented him from discovering his real situation in the eyes of God. Due to his pride and lack of compassion, he could not perceive the spiritual riches hidden in Lazarus’ heart of which his life was utterly lacking. Blinded by the lure of riches, the rich man could not see the poverty of his heart and spirit. Had he welcomed Lazarus into his life, he would have learned from him the wisdom he needed and he would have discovered the treasures that could not be destroyed nor stolen and that lead to eternal bliss in the heavenly Kingdom.

The humble acknowledgment of our poverty and need leads us to relate with the poor in a different way. We do not anymore see them as mere recipients of our generous gifts, but as providers of the wisdom and many other gifts that we lack. We do not simplistically claim then that we are giving them a better life, because, the truth is, when we share life with them on a profound level, we realize that they have made us better persons, much more genuine disciples of Jesus. Without them, perhaps it would be much harder for us to understand and follow the Jesus who is proclaimed in the Gospels. (Fr. Edwin Fernandez, SVD DWC, Laoag Bible Diary 2016)

rveritas-asia.org/index.php/daily-reflection/485-february-25-2016-thursday

********************************************************************************

March 8, 2012

St. John of God
Thursday of the Second Week of Lent
VIOLET

Jer 17:5-10
Ps 1
Lk 16:19-31

The Parable of the Rich Man and Lazarus 

[Jesus said to the Pharisees,] 19“There was a rich man who dressed in purple garments and fine linen and dined sumptuously each day. 20And lying at his door was a poor man named Lazarus, covered with sores, 21who would gladly have eaten his fill of the scraps that fell from the rich man’s table. Dogs even used to come and lick his sores. 22When the poor man died, he was carried away by angels to the bosom of Abraham. The rich man also died and was buried, 23and from the netherworld, where he was in torment, he raised his eyes and saw Abraham far off and Lazarus at his side. 24And he cried out, ‘Father Abraham, have pity on me. Send Lazarus to dip the tip of his finger in water and cool my tongue, for I am suffering torment in these flames.’ 25Abraham replied, ‘My child, remember that you received what was good during your lifetime while Lazarus likewise received what was bad; but now he is comforted here, whereas you are tormented. 26Moreover, between us and you a great chasm is established to prevent anyone from crossing who might wish to go from our side to yours or from your side to ours.’ 27He said, ‘Then I beg you, father, send him to my father’s house, 28for I have five brothers, so that he may warn them, lest they too come to this place of torment.’ 29But Abraham replied, ‘They have Moses and the prophets. Let them listen to them.’ 30He said, ‘Oh no, father Abraham, but if someone from the dead goes to them, they will repent.’ 31Then Abraham said, ‘If they will not listen to Moses and the prophets, neither will they be persuaded if someone should rise from the dead.’ ”

Reflection:

He was in torment. The rich man in the parable is condemned not because he is rich. Lazarus is rewarded not because he is poor. The parable does not imply that wealth is bad. Nor does the story glorify poverty.

The rich man is tormented in the netherworld because he does nothing. He has the means to help Lazarus and uplift the latter’s deplorable situation. Yet, he wastes his opportunities to be of service. He is insensitive to the plight of the poor man at his door.

Riches may indeed blind us to the many Lazaruses in our midst. To whom much is given, much is expected in return. Wealth is not to be used for self-satisfaction alone. It is meant to be shared to gain eternal rewards.

Who are the Lazaruses in your life?

What can you share with them?

ssp.ph/index.php/365-Days-with-the-lord/march-8-2012.html

*****************************************************************************

Thursday of the 2nd Week of Lent (A): Luke 16:19-31. Why would Jesus leave the rich man in today’s parable unnamed, while the poor man he calls Lazarus? St. Augustine’s commentary is quite interesting: “The rich man’s name was well known around, but God kept quiet about it. The other’s name was lost in obscurity, but God spoke it. God kept quiet about the rich man’s name because he did not find it written in heaven. He spoke the poor man’s name because he found it written there, indeed he gave instructions for it to be written there.” And we ask: Why would this rich man’s name be absent in heaven? Definitely, it’s not simply because he is wealthy. The rich man cannot be present in heaven because he doesn’t have the heart of Christ; he has no compassion for the suffering neighbor. (Abet Uy)

abetuy.blogspot.com/2014/03/thursday-of-2nd-week-of-lent-a.html

*********************************************************************************

THURSDAY OF THE 2ND WEEK OF LENT (YEAR B) – LUKAS 16:19-31. UNSA MAY MAKAPAHIMONG DAOTAN SA MGA ADUNAHAN? Sa sambingay ni Hesus, ang dato gisilotan dili tungod kay siya adunahan kondili tungod kay siya nabutahan sa bahandi nga iyang gihuptan. Ang dato wala may gihimong daotan ngadto kang Lazaro, apan wala usab siyay gibuhat nga maayo para ning makalolooy nga tawo. Ang iyang pagbaliwala sa tawo nga naglisod maoy nagdala kaniya ngadto sa dapit nga puno sa kasakit. Kining sambingay usa ka pasidaan sa mga adunahan. Kon ikaw magrasyahan, ayaw paghunahuna sa imong kaugalingon katagbawan lamang. Hunahunaa usab ang imong mga kabos nga silingan ug tabangi sila sa pagpangitag kabuhi-an. Nindot ang panultihon nga nag-ingon, “When God blesses you financially, do not raise your standard of living, raise your standard of giving.”Posted by Abet Uy

abetuy.blogspot.com/2015/03/thursday-of-2nd-week-of-lent-year-b.html

**********************************************************************************

THURSDAY OF THE 2ND WEEK OF LENT (YEAR B) – LUKAS 16:19-31. UNSA MAY MAKAPAHIMONG DAOTAN SA MGA ADUNAHAN? Sa sambingay ni Hesus, ang dato gisilotan dili tungod kay siya adunahan kondili tungod kay siya nabutahan sa bahandi nga iyang gihuptan. Ang dato wala may gihimong daotan ngadto kang Lazaro, apan wala usab siyay gibuhat nga maayo para ning makalolooy nga tawo. Ang iyang pagbaliwala sa tawo nga naglisod maoy nagdala kaniya ngadto sa dapit nga puno sa kasakit. Kining sambingay usa ka pasidaan sa mga adunahan. Kon ikaw magrasyahan, ayaw paghunahuna sa imong kaugalingon katagbawan lamang. Hunahunaa usab ang imong mga kabos nga silingan ug tabangi sila sa pagpangitag kabuhi-an. Nindot ang panultihon nga nag-ingon, “When God blesses you financially, do not raise your standard of living, raise your standard of giving.”Posted by Abet Uy

abetuy.blogspot.com/2015/03/thursday-of-2nd-week-of-lent-year-b.html

********************************************************************************

My Reflection for Thursday March 20, Second Week of Lent, Luke 16:19-31: Imagine that you are the rich man in the gospel and you also saw Lazarus at your door. How would you react? Would you do the same as the rich man did in the gospel? Or you will give food to the poor man Lazarus?

You will surely answer that you will give food because this is the right act to do. And your decision to give food would also be influenced by the misfortune of the rich man after he died for he ended in hell. But is this who you really are? Do you really help the poor when nobody is watching you?

Often times we do good because we are influenced by the circumstances that surrounds us. For example in the gospel we read the rich man ended up in hell. Of course this is the circumstance that will influence us to do good for we don’t want to end-up in hell after we die.

But are we really naturally helpful, do we truly have a helpful heart for the poor? The gospel is an invitation for all of us to reflect on how we treat the poor. For example you may have a poor relative and a poor neighbor. How do you look at them? How do you treat them?   (Marino J. Dasmarinas)

mjdasma.blogspot.com/2014/03/my-reflection-for-thursday-march-20.html

******************************************************************************

Reflection: There are people like “Lazarus” in our midst

First of all, let us make some clarifications about today’s gospel. First, is that the rich man is not condemned because he was rich. He is not punished because he lived in abundance. Lazarus is not rewarded because he was poor. he was not favoured because he was in need. Second, is that the gospel does not imply that wealth is bad. Nor the gospel glorified poverty. Now the question is why was the rich man was condemned? It was because he did nothing. The rich man had all the means to help others. he had all the chances to uplift the deplorable situation of Lazarus. Yet, he wasted all these opportunities to be of service.

Yes, he did not send Lazarus away. Yes, he did not make fun or curse Lazarus. But he was insensitive to the sufferings of Lazarus. He was indifferent to him. He simply did not care. He was condemned because he did not show any concern or mercy to the plight of Lazarus. It was indeed as if Lazarus did not exist. He let Lazarus go hungry and starve to death.

Only if the rich man shows compassion, only if he becomes charitable, only if he uses his riches to help others, will he surely be saved.

The gospel points out two important things about riches. First, there is the danger of being obsessed with it. It is a great temptation to acquire, to possess and to hoard riches at the expense of other people. Riches could blind us to ignore the many “Lazarus” in our midst. Second, riches entail greater responsibility. If much is given to us then more is expected from us. Riches should never be used only to enrich oneself. It should never be spent to satisfy one’s desire. It should be utilized to merit eternal goods. It should be shared to gain the eternal rewards.

Now, we need to help our suffering “Lazarus” so that we can also be saved. We need to uplift them to profit heaven. Who are those “Lazarus” we need to help?

Story: Aurelio and Cornelio were soldiers. They were best of friends. And they were sent to war. In the course of fighting, their company retreated. During the retreat, one of them got lost. Reaching a safer place, Aurelio found that his friend was not with them. So he asked the permission of his company commander to return to the scene of the battle and search for Cornelio. The company commander gave his consent but warned him of the danger and futility of his effort. He said to Aurelio, “You are putting yourself into danger or maybe he is already dead.”

Yet, Aurelio went and looked for Cornelio. A few hours later, he returned. He was carrying on his back the lifeless body of his friend. The company commander said, “I told you so. He is already dead by the time you will find him.” The soldier replied, “Sir, I have no regrets. Before he died, he told me that he knew I would come for him.” And Aurelio added, “I have not failed him.”

Challenges: Who are those “Lazarus” in my life whom I have to help? What help have I to give them? Today, I will do good deeds to those people near and dear to me. I will return good favors to my employees and household helpers? (Msgr. Ruperto C. Santos STL, Jesus Serves and Saves Us, Makati: St. Pauls, 2003:79-81).

********************************************************************************

February 25, 2016

REFLECTION: “Most deceitful is the heart,” God tells us in today’s first reading. Anyone who has dared to look at himself or herself long and hard (for example, by means of regular examinations of conscience) knows how true this is.

Well, we have a vivid illustration of this truth in today’s gospel parable, which stages a rich man (mercifully anonymous) who enjoys a life of luxury at a stone’s throw away from a dying beggar, Lazarus. Was the rich man aware of Lazarus’ miserable life? Of course he was for, once, in the netherworld he mentions him to God by name. Yet, he never lifted a finger to lessen Lazarus’ poverty. No doubt he had succeeded in rationa­lizing his inaction by any number of reasonings: Am I Providence? Those wretches should be cared for by the Government not by honest tax­payers like me. You help one beggar and you’re soon invaded by ­hundreds of them…

“Most deceitful is the heart.” It is easy to blind ourselves to what we do not want to see. Forty thousand people die every day of hunger worldwide, yet the rich countries spend fortunes on perfumes and weight-reducing treatments…

CLARETIAN COMMUNICATIONS FOUNDATION, INC.

8 Mayumi Street, U.P. Village, Diliman, 1101 Quezon City, Philippines

Tel.: (02) 921-3984, 922-9806 • Fax: (02) 921-6205

http://www.schoolofthewordonline.com/scriptural-library/daily-gospel/english/item/3454-february-25-2016

********************************************************************************

See Today’s Readings:  Year I,   Year II

Back to: Thursday of the 2nd Week of Lent

This entry was posted in zz. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s