Saturday of the 4th Week of the Year

Mk 6:30-34

The Return of the Twelve

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES:

The Twelve reported to Jesus about their mission experiences. THEY taught the people. THEY drove out demons THEY healed. Soon they would think they don’t need Jesus anymore. They can do it alone.

Jesus sensed the danger. In their success they had failed miserably. He had to take them to a lonely place to set right what went wrong in their heads.

They trap into which the Twelve fell is still threatening us. Success in business can go to our head and we forget that whatever we gained was given by God to be used wisely. And how often do we see preachers on TV for the sake of popularity, abbreviate the teachings of Christ and Church, keep the Cross out and proclaim only what tickle the people.

In such moments Jesus stands before us and tells us: “You must come away to some lonely place…. And rest for awhile.” In modern words, “Cool off, guys!” Jesus wants to form us, point out what went wrong in our attitude and give us guidelines for our future task as his disciples. He will make us aware again that we are far from graduating from discipleship, that we are far from being teachers. That we still have to learn much, especially that we are nothing but instruments, mouthpieces of Jesus whom he needs to proclaim his Good News. (Fr. Rudy Horst, SVD Bible Diary 2002)

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In today’s word of God we read Christ’s exhortation to His apostles to “come away to a deserted place to rest awhile,” in other words, to take a break from being too busy, get refreshed, savor the peace of silence again and be rejuvenated in the Spirit. I remember the times when my parish priest, Fr. Greg Sebastian and I (I was his assistant during my first 1 ½ years as a priest in Taiwan) would keep Monday free: “free rising,” tennis after breakfast in the courts of Alishan and Mass together with the Blue Sisters in the afternoon back in the parish at Fenchihu. It always felt good to celebrate our community as missionaries by sharing common activities and simply flat off the stresses of the week’s evangelizing work. No wonder we kept our relationship free from conflicts, misunderstanding, short fuses, suspicions and enhanced appreciation and respect for one another.

Oftentimes it is easy to get engrossed with the ecstasy of doing things “for God” and forget that we are not yet in heaven. We are not yet free from the tyranny of the tired spirit that can eat up that last inch of goodness in us. I may not be the best witness about keeping oneself from burnout, but I have realized that to last through all the work at hand, I need to realize that God is the Master of all these and I am simply His worker. Even the worker deserves a day-off!

My former rector in college Fr. Wim Virgoossen, SVD once gave us a simple mathematical proof that a day off, actually increases work efficiency. Normally, we work 8 hours a day. By keeping the Lord’s Day (Sunday) for rest, our work efficiency of 8 hours is maintained everyday. However, when we don’t rest, work efficiency actually gets sloppier to the point that we only do about 5-6 hours of real work daily. (5-6 hours x 7 days = 35-42 hours). Whereas, 8 hours x 6 days = 48 hours. I believe we would really want to give more solid hours of service to the Lord. Think about it! (Fr. Bernard Collera, SVD Bible Diary 2005)

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Out of this short gospel comes a big reminder for people who are involved in the teaching and practice of religion. Jesus has this message: Religion has no office hours!

The late Fr. Frank Mihalic, SVD shares with us his thoughts along thin line. People who do religious work “must not restrict their availability to certain hours as a professional business people do. No matter if our office hours are over, no matter if our teaching day is finished, no matter if it is our time for relaxing or praying, no matter if we are tired from our religious service, this is the time when the religious people in every walk of life can follow the example of Jesus in today’s gospel. He and his disciples were supposed to get away and rest awhile. But seeing the crowds who followed them, “his heart was moved with pity…and he began to teach them many things.”

Many people had left the practice of religion because they received the brush-off by religious people. Maybe it took a penitents months to get the courage and now he/she is told they have come at the wrong time. That kind of experience can kill every spark of faith in a soul. Remember how Nicodemus came to Jesus at night? Jesus had time for him….

“Being in the Lord’s service means that we are asked to give mostly of our time – ANYTIME.” (Fr. Doms Ramos, SVD Bible Diary 2007)

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February 6, 2016 Saturday

Fr. Mark Link, SJ, in his Daily Homilies (Mark Link, SJ, Daily Homilies, St. Pauls Press Training School, Bandra, Mumbai 400,050, 1997) shared the experience and nding of Dr. W. R. Luxton, saying: “I cannot overstate the importance of the habit of quiet meditation for health of body, mind and spirit. Modern man’s life is grossly abnormal. We have neither time nor opportunity for quiet…

We need to explore our lives…as we sit quietly and unhurried in his presence.” Eckhart Tolle in his little book, Stillness Speaks(Eckhart Tolle, Namaste Publishing & New World Library, Vancouver, Canada/Navaro, California, 2003) said something deep regarding quietude and stillness: “When you lose touch with inner stillness, you lose touch with yourself. When you lose touch with yourself, you lose yourself in the world. Your innermost sense of self, of who you are, is inseparable from stillness.

This is the I Am that is deeper than name and form…Stillness is your essential nature.” Jesus knew the need for quiet meditation. He made it a matter of course to isolate Himself to commune with His Father, and in today’s Gospel, invites His disciples to do the same. Do we spend some time to commune with our Most Loving Father in our day to day lives? (Fr. Fred Mislang, SVD | VCR, CKMS, Quezon City Bible Diary 2016)

Source: rveritas-asia.org/index.php/daily-reflection/446-february-6-2016-saturday

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Marcos 6:30-34. Nganong importante man ang pagpahulay diha sa kahilom? Human sa malampuson nga pagsangyaw, ang mga apostoles giingnan ni Jesus: “Mangadto kita sa dapit nga awaaw aron makapahulay kamog diyotay.” Isip lawasnon, kinahanglan natong hatagan og panahon nga makapahulay ang atong lawas aron maandam sa sunod nga mga buluhaton. Kon dili kita mohunong sa pagtrabaho, dako ang purohan nga magkasakit kita ug maluya. Dugang pa niana, isip espirituhanon, angay usab natong papahulayon ang atong utok ug kasingkasing aron kini makahunahuna ug makabati sa kabubut-on sa Dios. Diha sa kahilom ug sa pag-ampo, atong masinati ang kalinaw ug masabtan ang kagustohan sa Ginoo para sa atong kinabuhi (Fr. Abet Uy –

(English) Mark 6: 30-34. Why is it important to rest in silence? After successfully preaching, Jesus told the apostles: “Let us go to the desert to have a little rest.” As a body, we need to give time to rest our bodies to prepare for the next assignment. If we do not stop working, the potential for ill and weak. Furthermore, as the spiritual, we need to refresh our mind and heart to think and feel the will of God. In silence and prayer, we experience peace and understand the will of the Lord for our lives.

Source: abetuy.blogspot.com/2013/02/saturday-of-4th-week-in-ordinary-time.html).

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SATURDAY OF THE 4TH WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME (YEAR B) – MARCOS 6:30-34. Nganong importante man ang pagpahulay diha sa kahilom? Human sa malampuson nga pagsangyaw, ang mga apostoles giingnan ni Hesus: “Mangadto kita sa dapit nga awaaw aron makapahulay kamog diyotay.” Isip lawasnon, kinahanglan natong hatagag panahon nga makapahulay ang atong lawas aron maandam sa sunod nga mga buluhaton. Kon dili kita mohunong sa pagtrabaho, dako ang purohan nga masakit kita ug maluya. Isip espirituhanon, angay usab natong papahulayon ang atong utok ug kasingkasing aron kini mahiluna diha sa Dios. Diha sa kahilom ug sa pag-ampo, atong masinati ang kalinaw ug masabtan ang kabubut-on sa Ginoo para kanato. Kini ang pahimangno ni Mother Teresa: “Ang Dios mosulti kanato diha sa kahilom sa atong kasingkasing. Ang pagpaminaw mao ang sinugdanan sa pag-ampo.” Posted by Abet Uy

(English) Mark 6: 30-34. Why is it important to rest in the silence? After successfully preaching, the apostles Jesus said: “Let us go to the desert to have a little rest.” As a body, we need to give time to rest our bodies to prepare for the next assignment. If we do not stop working, the potential for pain and weak. As spiritual, we need to refresh our mind and heart so that it lies in God. In silence and prayer, we experience peace and understand the will of God for us. This warning Mother Teresa: “God tells us in the silence of our hearts. Listening is the beginning of prayer. ”

Source: abetuy.blogspot.com/2015/02/saturday-of-4th-week-in-ordinary-time.html

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Verse 31: “Come away to a deserted place and rest awhile.” What is real rest? First, it is doing what we love and enjoy doing. It’s the love and joy we put into our work that makes work look like rest.

Second, to rest is to pray. After we have done our work we can lay down and ask the Lord to do His share.

Third, to rest is to let others rest. The world will turn even without you and me. So come and rest awhile in the Lord.

“Lord, teach me your statutes.” Let’s find time to unwind and re-charge and rest in the Lord. (Reggie)

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THE LORD’S REST “Come away by yourselves to a deserted place and rest a while.” – Mark 6:31

There was a time when my involvement in our Catholic community took three to four days of my week. I had a career as a a full-time engineer and had no time for other things, but I was extremely fulfilled.

But the Lord pulled the plug and allowed me to step back from ministry for a time. It was a painful time for me — a “wilderness experience.” I soon found myself on the way to the picturesque deserts of Sedona and the Grand Canyon. I felt the Lord say to me, “The desert can be beautiful!”

When my consulting business was picking up, I would speak 15 to 20 days in a month. I’d never worked so hard but I was enjoying every minute of it. But my blood pressure shot up and I started coughing. I took prescribed medicines and high-end supplements. They worked, but what really made me feel better was an out-of-town trip with the family to celebrate the birthdays of my wife and my sister. God used the beach, sand and fresh air to drive my sickness away.

The Lord values rest and balance. Work has value, especially when we are fulfilling our mission, but more than work is the value of our fellowship with God as we rest in Him. Ariel Driz (adriz77@yahoo.com)

Reflection: How do you balance your work and your need for rest?

Lord Jesus, I desire to experience You in a deeper, meaningful way despite the busyness and pressures of work. Amen.

Source: kerygmafamily.com/modules/dailyreadings/read.php?date=2015-02-07

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February 06, 2016

REFLECTION:Two details in today’s gospel reading are rather striking. The first one is the decision of Jesus to take time off—he and the Twelve apostles— from their evangelizing activity and to simply go away on a vacation. This fact in itself is an indictment on busybody Christians who act as if the salvation of the world rested on their shoulders. They go about always in a hurry, always serious-faced, always intent on pursuing some apostolic endeavor. At some point somebody would do well to stop them in their tracks and remind them: “Hey! The world has already been saved! Our job is merely to announce it.”

The second striking detail is the statement, “(Jesus) had compassion on them, for they were like sheep without a shepherd, and he began to teach them many things.” Few Christians realize that teaching the Christian faith (whether as parents or friends or catechists or priests) is one of the greatest acts of compassion possible. For it boils down to bringing light to those in the darkness of ignorance and despair. So many people are lost as regards the basic truths of life: where do we come from, where we are going, how do we get there? To enlighten them is a magnificent act of compassion.

CLARETIAN COMMUNICATIONS FOUNDATION, INC.

8 Mayumi Street, U.P. Village, Diliman, 1101 Quezon City, Philippines

Tel.: (02) 921-3984, 922-9806 • Fax: (02) 921-6205

Source: schoolofthewordonline.com/scriptural-library/daily-gospel/english/item/3435-february-06-2016

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Friday, February 5, 2016

Reflection for February 6, Saturday; Sts. Pedro Bautista, Paul Miki and Companions; martyr Mark 6:30-34

Reflection: Do you always have time to be with Jesus?

In the gospel, after working so hard to spread the gospel Jesus noticed that the apostles were tired from doing their mission. Thus, He told the apostles to be with Him in a place by themselves to rest.

Why to be with Him and not to be alone by themselves? Because it’s only through Him that they could have complete recovery from their physical and spiritual tiredness. If they go alone to a quite place by themselves they surely could re-invigorate themselves physically. But how could they re-energize their spirits without Jesus?

In our materially driven world we are always on the move, always busy with work and other things. So we get tired naturally and to ease this tiredness some of us go on vacation to re-charge our tired and weary bodies.

But this earthly vacation is not enough we need to have time for Jesus also so that He could restore and strengthen our weary spirits. We are not only  creatures of this world we are also to become citizens of heaven in the future time appointed by God. Thus, we need to have our regular quite and solemn time for Jesus. To simply be with Him and deepen our intimacy with Him.

In what way can we have an intimacy with Jesus to rest and allow HIM to nourish us? We can go to Mass to listen to His words being proclaimed in the readings. WE can also receive HIM during Holy Communion.

We can have our quite time with Jesus in the Adoration chapel and allow HIM to embrace us with His unconditional love. We can read the bible and meditate on His very words that can transform us anytime. We can also attend a recollection and feel the presence of God there. These are simple ways on how we can spend time with God and be in quite place with HIM.

But sad to say many of us forget it because we are always busy, we allow ourselves to be engulfed by the things and activities of this world which are temporary and passing. We forget the eternal that is Jesus. – Marino J. Dasmarinas

Source: mjdasma.blogspot.com/2016/02/reflection-for-february-6-saturday-sts.html

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Saturday, February 6 2016

I Kgs 3:4-13;  Mk 6:30-34

Jesus the Mother!

It was revolutionary when Jesus addressed God as father two thousand years ago. It will have far reaching impact in our spiritual life, and in material life too if we can address Jesus as our mother. Today’s Gospel shows us the motherly love of Jesus. When the disciples came back after a tiresome missionary journey, like a caring mother Jesus asked them to come along with him for rest. Jesus empathised with the crowd when he saw them as sheep without shepherd (vv31, 34).

The idea of Yahweh as a ‘mother’ figure was not new to Israelites. The Torah (Dt 1:31 and Num 11:12), Prophetic Texts (Is 66:13, Mal 3:17) and Wisdom Tradition (Ps 68:5-6, Prov 3:12, Wis 2:18) have many references where God is seen with motherly qualities. But it was Jesus who personified motherly love of God in its fullness as we see in the Gospels. Jesus cared for others in his care, guided them, motivated them, healed them, forgave them and even chastised them when it was needed. It was the ‘motherly Jesus who prepared breakfast for the disciples on the shore of Tiberius (Jn 21:1-17).

To address Jesus as our mother, instead of good shepherd (or any other titles) does not add or deduct any degree of his glory. But it can certainly remind us to be ‘mothers’ in any given situation by becoming sensitive to the needs of others and by wholeheartedly spending our self  to help others. Jesus, the mother reminds us that becoming ‘mother’ to others is not a virtue, but a requisite quality to be a follower of Jesus. Fr. Johnson Bezalel CMI

Source: navchetana.com/web/homilies.php?date=2016-02-6

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See Today’s Readings:  Year I,   Year II

Back to: Saturday of the 4th Week of the Year

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