Thursday of the 3rd Week of the Year

Mk 4:21-25

Parable of the Lamp

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES:

A lamp is meant to be seen and to enable people to see. From this statement alone we could already learn two important lessons:

Truth is meant to be seen. Truth is not meant to be concealed. There maybe times or occasions when it is dangerous to tell the truth. There maybe times when to tell the truth is the quickest way to persecution and to trouble. But a truthful person and a truthful Christian will stand by the truth in the face of all. Unfortunately, when money talks, truth begins to be silent.

Our practice of Christianity is also meant to be seen. It is something that has to be attested and witnessed to in the presence of others. Our practice of Christianity should always be like a lamp that has to be seen by all.

In the same gospel narrative Jesus said, “there is secret that will not be brought into open.” Let’s take a concrete example: When a person does something wrong his first instinct is to hide or conceal the wrongdoing. This is precisely what Adam and Eve did when they broke God’s commandment (Gen 3:8). But truth has a way of coming out. In the final analysis, no person could hide the truth from himself, and a person with a dark past and an unpleasant secret will never be a happy person.

The web of deception is never a permanent concealment. When it comes to ultimate things, no person could hide anything from God. For God is able to read the heart of everyone. God knows our every motivation, plan, desire, strategy, scheme, etc. we can never hide or conceal anything from God. (Fr. Louie (PUnzalan, SVD Bible Diary 2002)

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When somebody tells me to “take care,” that person usually means that I have to pay attention to my health and safety. These are words of endearment and concern that we often use to end personal letters and short text messages, or parting words to somebody who leaves and travels somewhere. But what happens when these words are used other than what we are familiar to?

In today’s gospel, the Lord uses the same words: “Take care…” but they are not directed exclusively to our health, well-being and safety. He rather says: “Take care what you hear.” Is this not rather strange? Seemingly, Jesus is more interested in telling us to be concerned with what we hear rather than to be looking after our personal life and health.

Certainly, this is not the way how we should understand the text today. If there is one person in the whole world who is very interested and concerned with the welfare of every human person, it is Jesus our Lord Himself.

Take a careful look at many things that He said to us. In fact, most of them lead to our well-being, like love of neighbors, respect for one’s life, forgiveness of others, dying for others, love your enemies, service to others and compassion for others. what more proofs do we need to believe that Jesus is deeply concerned for us?

Therefore, if we ever we want to achieve a fully contented and peaceful life, we must learn to listen to His words, and live by His words, Jesus gave us a beautiful recipe not only for a meaningful life on earth, but life eternal in His kingdom. In this regard, Jesus is surely correct to admonish us in today’s words: “Take care what you hear.”

Maybe we care more to listen to what the secular world is telling us. No wonder, we always find ourselves in chaos. Today, Jesus appeals to each one of us to “take care what we hear.” How much time do we give ourselves to read and hear His word daily? (Fr. Gerry Donato, SVD Bible Diary 2008)

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January 28, 2016 Thursday

Today we celebrate the Feast Day of St. Thomas Aquinas, the greatest philosopher-theologian of Christendom, considered the “Angelic Doctor” and the author of Summa Theologiae—the most celebrated philosophical/theological treatise of Christians.

An anecdote goes that St. Thomas, one day, was given a very fleeting vision of heaven. In one blinding ash of light, he saw a glimpse of it. He was stunned and speechless. Nothing he ever wrote or imagined about the nature of the Supreme Being, the angels, the human soul, and the afterlife came close to the ineffable beauty of what he briefly glanced in a nanosecond. From then on, St. Thomas stopped writing, and grew very thoughtful.

One analogy I like most by St. Thomas, originating from St. Augustine of Hippo, is the comparison between light and darkness. He said that darkness is nothing but the absence (privation) of light, just as evil is nothing but the absence of good. When Jesus suggests that a lamp is meant to be put on a lamp stand, he seems to say that we should let our good works “shine” like a lamp light being the metaphor of good.

After the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus tells his disciples that they are the “lights” of the world. Jesus refers to himself as the “Light of the world.” Since we belong to Jesus who is the “Light of the world,” we are committed to light the world with our good words and deeds. Good words/deeds are done under the light; while evil deeds like adultery, cheating, theft, murder, etc. are done under the cover of darkness.

So let your light (goodness) shine (to shine is the nature of light): the light of charity, compassion, caring, sincerity, and love. (Fr. Raymun J. Festin, SVD | CKMS, Quezon City Bible Diary 2016)

Source: rveritas-asia.org/index.php/daily-reflection/436-january-28-2016-thursday

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THURSDAY OF THE 3RD WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME (YEAR B) MARCOS 4:21-25. Unsa may kalainan sa pagpanghambog ug sa pagmodelo? Ang tawo nga manghambog magbuhat og maayo atubangan sa mga tawo aron daygon. Ang iyang pagmatarong dili tininuod ug dili mohangtod. Mag-alagad lamang siya kon adunay magtan-aw kaniya; kon wala, dili siya magpakabana. Samtang ang tawo nga magmodelo magbuhat og maayo aron ang mga tawo makat-on sa pagdayeg sa Ginoo. Ang iyang pagbinuotan kinasingkasing ug makanunayon. Magserbisyo siya bisan walay mga tawo tungod kay nasayod siya nga adunay nagtan-aw nga Ginoo. Diha sa ebanghelyo kita gidasig ni Hesus sa pagpakita sa atong kahayag ug katarong ngadto sa kalibotan dili aron manghambog kondili aron mahimong maayong panig-ingnan sa katawhan.Posted by Abet Uy

Source: abetuy.blogspot.com/2015/01/thursday-of-3rd-week-in-ordinary-time.html

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

THURSDAY OF THE 3RD WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME (YEAR C) – MARCOS 4:21-25. UNSA MAY KALAINAN SA PAGPANGHAMBOG UG SA PAGMODELO? Ang tawo nga manghambog magbuhat og maayo atubangan sa mga tawo aron daygon. Ang iyang pagmatarong dili tininuod ug dili mohangtod. Mag-alagad lamang siya kon adunay magtan-aw kaniya; kon wala, dili siya magpakabana. Samtang ang tawo nga magmodelo magbuhat og maayo aron ang mga tawo makat-on sa pagdayeg sa Ginoo. Ang iyang pagbinuotan kinasingkasing ug makanunayon. Magserbisyo siya bisan walay mga tawo tungod kay nasayod siya nga adunay nagtan-aw nga Ginoo. Sa ebanghelyo karon gidasig kita ni Hesus sa pagpakita sa atong kahayag ug katarong ngadto sa kalibotan dili aron manghambog kondili aron mahimong maayong panig-ingnan sa tanang katawhan. Nindot ang giingon: “Aspire to inspire before you expire.” Posted by Abet Uy

Source: abetuy.blogspot.com/2016/01/thursday-of-3rd-week-in-ordinary-time.html

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Thursday of the 3rd Week of Ordinary Time

2 Sam 7: 18-19, 24-29; Mk 4: 21-25

The Little You Have Will be Taken Away

There was once a monk who spent his whole life sitting inside a dark cave. He meditated day-in and day-out. He never stepped out of his cave. He never rose from his meditation. He simply sat there meditating inside his dark cave all throughout his life. He had disciples though who brought him food and drink. Few grains of wheat and few drops of water were all he consumed. At the end of his quiet life, he died lame and blind, for he never used his ability to walk and his sense of sight.

Jesus concludes the gospel today with a warning: “…the man who has will be given more; from the man who has not, even what he has will be taken away.” Our monk-story illustrates this point clearly. Anything we have if not put into good and regular use weakens until it is completely gone. But that which we use properly and often, strengthens and grows.

What then do we have? Do we use it at all? How do we use it?

\What a pity for us if we do not even know what we have. Worse if we do not use it at all. And worst if we do not use it for a good end.

St Thomas Aquinas

The best preacher is the best witness. The best homily is the preacher’s life. The best pulpit is the here and now. Pope Paul VI wrote in Evangelii Nuntiandi, “Modern man no longer listens to teachers but to witnesses. And if he listens to teachers, it is because they are first witnesses.

What we preach and how we live are intimately related with each other: they are either compatible or incompatible. When what we preach is irreconcilable with how we live, we lie. When what we preach is congruent with how we live, we are truthful.

Today, we remember in the liturgy a man who always searched for and lived by the truth. Thomas Aquinas, born in 1224, is known as the symbol of universally approved orthodoxy. He eloquently explained our faith in his Summa Theologica and captured the hearts of many by his sanctity. With his mastery of philosophy and scholastic theology undisputed and his holiness of life profound, Thomas gained the title of “Angelic Doctor” and was declared Patron of Catholic Schools by Pope Leo XIII.

Thomas Aquinas is a preacher par excellence because he was truthful. He was truthful because he lived by what he preached. We may not become doctors of the Church, but we can be angelic like Thomas if our lives bear witness to what we preach. Fr .Abraham Puthukulangara CMI

navchetana.com/web/homilies.php?date=2016-01-28

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January 28, 2016

REFLECTION: We usually associate courage with action: the discovery of new lands, the facing of dangers on the high seas, the undertaking of tasks against impossible odds. And here we have dozens of novels and movies staging swashbuckling daredevils ready for adventure and excitement. That is courage, we spontaneously think. However, in reality that is merely physical courage. But there are other forms of courage, one of them being intellectual courage. Naturally it is much less impressive than physical courage, for it is not displayed in feats of action. Yet, it is every bit—and perhaps more—admirable than physical courage.

Today’s saint was a giant of the mind who, in his self-effacing manner, dared to attempt almost ­impossible goals: use the pagan philosophical system of Aristotle to express the Christian mystery in intelligible terms, plumb the ineffable being of God and explain his findings in simple and ­luminous words, utter about our whole human adventure definitions and descriptions which no one uttered before or after him. Aquinas-the-Courageous faced God’s mystery at every turn and never flinched from the challenge of trying to explore what is bottomless.
“For to the one who produces something, more will be given.”

CLARETIAN COMMUNICATIONS FOUNDATION, INC.

8 Mayumi Street, U.P. Village, Diliman, 1101 Quezon City, Philippines

Tel.: (02) 921-3984, 922-9806 • Fax: (02) 921-6205

schoolofthewordonline.com/scriptural-library/daily-gospel/english/item/3426-january-28-2016

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See Today’s Readings:  Year I,   Year II

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