Christ the King (A)

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES:

Solemnity of Christ the King – On the Gospel

Ezekiel 34:11-12, 15-17

1 Corinthians 15:20-26, 28

Matthew 25:31-46

Fr Munachi E. Ezeogu, cssp

True Subjects of the Kingdom

 The Salvation Army does not believe in baptism, in the Eucharist nor in the priesthood. Yet you never hear anybody criticizing them. Why? Because what they do speaks so loudly that no one cares what they believe. They provide soup kitchens for the starving. They clothe the naked on our streets. They rehabilitate those addicted to drug and alcohol. They are there wherever disaster strikes. As far as people are concerned these are the things that count. The Parable of the Last Judgment in today’s gospel shows that these are the things that count before God as well. For in the Last Judgement no mention whatsoever is made of people’s church beliefs but only of the practical help they gave or did not give to the needy and the disadvantaged of this world.

Today, the last Sunday in the liturgical year, we celebrate and confess Christ as our king. The readings invite us to reflect on the kind of king Christ is and what it means for us to truly say that we belong to his kingdom. The first reading from Ezekiel talks about God as the shepherd of Israel. The kings of Israel were regarded as God’s visible representatives and were given the divine title of shepherd. But many of them did not live up to this responsibility. Their leadership style differed from God’s style. God’s style was that of giving priority of attention to the needs of the disadvantaged, especially their need for justice and empowerment. This is affirmative action in the best sense of the word:

I will seek the lost, and I will bring back the strayed, and I will bind up the injured, and I will strengthen the weak, but the fat and the strong I will destroy. I will feed them with justice (Ezekiel 34:16).

First God raised up prophets, like Ezekiel, to warn the kings. When they failed to listen, God decided to get rid of the ungodly kings and their beneficiaries, and promised that He would shepherd the flock Himself. The defeat of Israel by her enemies, in which the big people, the royalty and the nobility, were banished into exile was seen as God’s way of getting rid of the bad leadership.

What about God’s promise to rule His people Himself. As Christians we see that this promise is fulfilled in the person of our Lord, Jesus Christ whose kingship we celebrate today. Jesus has begun his reign as king, but he will come on Judgment Day to bring it to completion. On that day he will sit on his throne and sort out from all nations those men and women, boys and girls who really belong to his kingdom. Notice that both the righteous and the accursed address Jesus as “Lord.” It is not what we call him that matters but whether or not we have come to the help of the needy and the disadvantaged in our midst.

The specific actions mentioned are (i) feeding the hungry, (ii) giving drink to the thirsty, (iii) clothing the naked, (iv) sheltering the homeless, (v) visiting those in prison, and (vi) taking care of the sick. Add (vii) burying the dead, and you have the traditional Seven Corporal Works of Mercy. The Final Judgment on whether we are true Christians or not, whether we belong to the kingdom of Christ or not, will be based on whether or not we have done the corporal works of mercy. This is our number one moral obligation both as individual men and women and as a family of believers.

The good news we celebrate today is that we have a King who, unlike the kings of this world, pays attention to us and helps us not only when we are needy and disadvantaged, but especially when we are needy and disadvantaged. The challenge for us today is to forget our own needs for love and happiness and to reach out in love to make someone happy who may be in greater need. For whatever we do to the least of these needy children of God, theses brothers and sisters of Jesus, we do to Jesus Himself.

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The Solemnity of Our Lord Jesus Christ the King – Cycle A

 Homily # 1

So, who needs a king anyway, especially in America , the land of the free and the home of the brave?  After all, didn’t we fight the Revolutionary War to get away from the king of England and all that he represented?  To answer that question—who needs a king?—we certainly do not need a king who walks around in royal trappings, handing out favors at his whim.

To associate kings like that with Christ the King is to underestimate both God and ourselves.  Some people, even people we know, say that they do not believe in God.  But, the truth is, it is not the one, true God that they do not believe in.  They do not believe in the image of God that is presented to them.  And, that is because the image of God presented to them is too inadequate—too earthly, if you will.  The fact of the matter is that even the most ardent believers in the one, true God would not believe in him as presented many times in our modern world.  I also believe that the main reason why people hurt each other is because we do not see each other as God sees us and as God loves us.

We have all heard the phrase, “God loves us” thousands of times, but do we really believe it?  I mean, do we really think of Jesus as the son of a truly loving God?  Or, do we think of God as some sort of harsh judge, who sits up there just waiting for us to break one of his many rules?

And, if we do think of God as someone who loves us, do we not often assume that his love comes with strings attached?  You know, we think that God will only love us if we keep every one of his rules and thus show ourselves to be worthy of his love.  There are many religions out there that teach this very thing.  Thank God, Catholicism is not one of them!  No, our precious faith teaches that God loves us and will love us eternally, just as we are.  Otherwise, why would he have died for us on the cross?

Christ, our eternal king, has already defeated the king of this world—Satan.  Christ has also defeated sin and death.  Christ, in his power and because of his total love for us, will never kill for the truth.  He will die for it, however.  Christ wins, not by spilling the blood of others, but by offering his own blood for us.  He does not dominate us by pure power.  He just invites us to love him and he serves us out of his love for us.  He wants nothing in return except the love of our hearts for him.  How is that for a king?!!

The time is coming, and nobody knows exactly when, when all of human history will come to a close—when all human powers and governments are brought to an end.  The time is coming when every person will recognize at last that God is truly our king and the power behind all of creation.  At that moment, every person who ever lived will bow before Christ our king—every person.

So, to call Christ our king is simply to recognize that all power, all authority and all glory belong to him.  To call Christ our king is to give up our claim to power and authority and glory.  We take credit for nothing, except for our sins.  To call Christ king is a call of praise and trust and a pledge of obedience to him.  It has absolutely nothing to do with politics and crowns.  It has absolutely everything to do with faith and humility and worship.

Many people are afraid to believe in Christ because they do not know what is coming in the future.  And, you know what, they are completely correct.  We do not know what is coming or when it is coming, but we do know who is coming.  He is the alpha and the omega, the one who is and who was and who is to come, the almighty.

So, in the end, we will find out, much to our delight, that the Christ in whom we now trust, can be trusted to reign over us for ever.  And, because Jesus reigns, evil does not reign.  Because Christ is king, no other petty power, including Satan and his hordes, can rule us eternally unless we want Satan to be our king.  Because Christ is king, all of us will be safe forever.  Because Christ is king, all of us will be free forever—safe and free from everything and everyone that has ever bothered us.

Thanks be to God.  Thanks be to Christ our king.  Amen and amen.


Homily # 2

The feast of Christ the King presents us with a rather chilling message. Jesus is very blunt. He says to His disciples “Those who did not feed Him, give Him water, did not welcome Him, did not clothe Him and did not care for Him will be sent off to eternal punishment.

The Jews could respond by saying, “We never saw you in those conditions.”

Christ responds that by not helping one of the “least of your brethren, you did not help Me.”

These words were spoken 2000 years ago and we may think they do not apply to us. We, too, don’t see starving people, thirsty people and those others Jesus described. But wait a minute, Jesus indicated to the Jews that He was no talking about himself but was describing anyone who needed help.

Today, it’s still somewhat “Out of sight , out of mind.” We don’t see the poor and lonely so we don’t think His words apply to us.

Closer to home it’s not that we don’t see, or hear, or notice but just that we don’t consider that Jesus may be talking to us here today. So, who are those that we may not notice, even if they are very close to us? Well, let’s consider our families!

Some of the young people here are with their mothers and fathers everyday but do you really see them as Jesus asks that you to do. Well, what do parents need? One of the things they need is obedience and respect from their children. That would certainly meet the criteria of “caring for” your mother and father.

Now, the young people here might say, “I’m confused. Jesus didn’t mention “obedience”. Well, He did say “Those who do not care for others, and that would certainly include parents, could be liable to the punishments Christ mentioned.”

I’m not trying top lay a “guilt trip” on the young people here but I am saying that when we read the words of Jesus each Sunday, we must asked ourselves, “Well, I wasn’t there but what is He saying to me in my circumstances right now?”

Your parents feed you, they clothe you, they care for you when you are sick

so they seem to be fulfilling Jesus’ commands. And so, it would seem that he is saying to the young people, “Respect your parents, obey your parents and thank them for all they have done for you.” They probably ask that you do not get involved in alcohol and drugs. They ask you drive carefully. When you analyze the things your parents ask of you it’s easy to see they are concerned about your welfare ….. they love you and they want you to be safe.

By like token, as we mentioned earlier, parents have responsibilities to their children, o feed them, educate them, love them and care for them. So, all of us have the same responsibility to listen to the words of Jesus each week and apply those words to our lives, today. He was not speaking just to the people that were alive 2000 years ago. His words relate to our association with our friends, our associates,, to everyone with whom we come in contact. So we can’t live in a shell and say, That’s someone else’s problem. Let them take care of themselves.” Jesus doesn’t ask that we spend all of our free time helping others … He doesn’t say we should take all of our money and give it away. However He does say, “What you did not do for one of these least ones, you did not do for Me.”

Each Sunday He sends us a message. We may think that just because His words were spoken 2000 years ago and that some of the situations He describes don’t apply to us, but that’s not true. Whether we be teenagers, young adults, middle aged or senior citizens, Jesus is speaking to us through the gospels. And today He said to us, “What you did not do for one of the least ones, you did not do for Me.”

As we come to Communion, it would be well for all of us to think about what He said.


Homily # 3

Recently, I heard Bishop Keleher talk about the need for silence during the mass. He did not mean dead silence, so this is not an invitation to sleep during the homily. He was pointing out the importance for taking time for meditative silence during mass to allow what we do, say and hear gathered here together to impact us more deeply, to let it mold our lives.

Our liturgy is packed full of amazing expressions of thankfulness, praise and exhortations to act. If we really took the time to stop and think about even half of what we say and hear at mass, it would be impossible to get it in and out of the parking lot in a day, let alone an hour. Yet we do. Sometimes in 45 minutes.

I would be a hypocrite if I suggested that I have always thought mass should go slower and longer. I am the youngest of eight kids, my mom did not give up on me—I am here today—but as a kid she used to send me out of mass frequently. I would go over and sit with the rectory housekeeper during the second half of many a mass. In the summer the process would start with me complaining that it was too “something hot” in here and talking some articles of clothing off—that is why I am having to wear more clothes for mass now and go to up to 4 or 5 masses on a weekend to make up for my past sins.

I am not even sure that adding meditative silence to mass would necessarily add time. Even if it would, we need to keep things in perspective. If we attend mass regularly from womb to tomb, assuming a lifetime of 80 years, we will spend about the equivalent amount of time in mass in our lifetime as we spend at work in 1.5 to 2 years. This means that we spend 20 times the amount of time working toward our earthly retirement (assuming thirty to 40 years work before retirement) than where we will spend our eternal rest. This is a little bit of an exaggeration obviously—we do work on being Christian outside of mass. However, it is truer than we may want to admit.

It is not that we are uninterested in our faith, hurrying is just an inherent risk with repetitive, uniform liturgy. We do say the same things over and over again. Within three years, we even hear the same Scripture over again. So there is always the temptation to go quickly and, even worse, to go on autopilot. In the end, we end up observing instead of participating defeating the purposes of the liturgical reforms, now forty years old, brought about by Vatican II.

To enhance the spiritual fruits of attending mass we need to fully and actively participate. (Note prayer in Sacristy) The mass is not entertainment or a spectator sport—gaining its full value is dependent on our active participation. Meditating on the words of our prayers, responses, the readings, the real presence of the lord, although silent, is a necessary part of our active participation.

You might be asking yourself, why would a missionary come and preach about meditative silence as an enhancement to the mass experience—aren’t missionaries supposed to focus on the needs of the poor and our responsibility to meet them? Meditative silence does not sound like a practical way to end poverty, starvation and illiteracy in Haiti.

Yet, my reason for encouraging us to ponder the words we say and hear at mass more deeply is very practical and directly connected to my work as a missionary. It is driven by my experience of those who do.

Over the years, I have come to know many people for whom some specific element of the mass, such as hearing the Gospel proclaimed, receiving Eucharist or praying in community, has had and continues to have a profound impact on them. These same people have been some of our most active supporters. Not all supporters have expressed a close connection to a particular aspect of what we hear, say and do each Sunday, but noticeable amount, especially those who have impressed others the most by their service and who have stayed with it longest, have.

It is only logical that the more we reflect on the words of the liturgy, the more we will take them to heart. The more we take what do, hear and say here each Sunday to heart, the more we will reflect it out there.

I have a vivid memory of a recent volunteer telling me how she wished we would take some time during mass to reflect after prayers and responses that proclaim God’s mercy to call to mind that our God is truly merciful, full of kindness and slow to anger.

It may seem like a small point, but it is not. It does take more than a moment to really appreciate God’s mercy and that He is slow to anger. If we do not take sufficient time to reflect on the good God has done for us when we say, “God is merciful” or how truly in need we are of God’s forgiveness when we say, “Lord to have mercy”, there is no way for us to connect these words to our experience. It is no wonder, what we say seems detached and formulaic much of the time.

It did not surprise me that this particular volunteer suggested that we would benefit from taking time for meditative reflection at the utterance “GOD IS MERCIFUL” during mass. Her charity toward her students was itself an expression her appreciation of God’s mercy. More importantly, having seen so many poor people in Haiti without work living in squalid neighborhoods where children are more likely to die before turning five than graduate from high school, she was keenly aware of how slow God must be to anger given our obvious sins of omission and our tolerance of others pain. Given her willingness to serve and her experience, it’s only natural that she wants time to stop and reflect on these words,

This is not an isolated case. Another volunteer, one who has since become our campus minister and is in her fourth year with the work in Haiti, flew down the stairs to tell her parents she was headed to Haiti upon hearing we needed another volunteer teacher from a friend. I did not have to convince this volunteer to join the work. She was ready to go, I just had to open the door. I have come to know that she too finds Mass fortifying in many special ways. Not surprisingly, for her it is hearing the Gospel’s call to serve read aloud.

As a missionary, I am a re-distributor. I am about moving people and resources from where they have piled up in abundance to where they are lacking and most needed. I want to testify to you that my work, every missionary’s work, is made much easier by what we do here each Sunday, not just because of the collections, but because the spiritual growth the mass provides for those who are willing to take the time and make the effort to ponder deeply what we do, say and hear here each Sunday and allow their reflection to impact their lives.

In my experience, those who have pondered the depths of what we say, hear and do together each Sunday, jump at the chance to serve and give. So, calling for more meditative silence is a very practical topic for a missionary looking for help and helpers.

As we complete the Liturgy of the word, let us take a moment of meditative silence to reflect deeply on how sorrowful it would be to be found by Christ with our lamps empty and our flames burnt out having not prepared properly through service of our neighbor and love of the Lord for his coming.


Homily # 4

A priest from India was assigned to St. John the Baptist parish for three years. Many parishioners considered him to be a very holy man. For this reason, we were very surprised when he told us that he hopes to die slowly from cancer. He reasoned that he would need a long time to prepare for his death. Many of us thought that he appeared to be much more prepared than we were. Of course, Fr. Showry was concerned for preparing for judgment day while we wanted a more sudden death to minimize physical suffering. The better choice depends on whether heaven or hell awaits us. And this will depend on our state of preparedness.

All of us are going to meet Jesus, and we must prepare now. Some of us will meet him instantaneously in something like a catastrophic car wreck and there will be no time to get more prepared than we are now. Others of us will die slowly from a debilitating disease and we will have lots of time to prepare. The rest of us will fall somewhere in between these two extremes.

This is the third Sunday in a row that St. Matthew has told a parable about being prepared to meet Christ. Two Sundays ago, we heard about ten virgins, half of whom were not prepared and found the door to the wedding feast locked. Last week, the parable was about a man who had received one talent but did nothing with it; he was throw outside where there was “wailing and grinding of teeth.”

Today’s parable comes on the last Sunday of the Church’s liturgical year when we celebrate the solemnity of Christ the King. Today’s readings are about the end time, when Jesus the King will separate us into groups, which will have either eternal life or eternal punishment. This separation will be based on how well we treat the least of our brothers and sisters for how we treat them is how we treat Christ our King.

This certainly wasn’t the type of king that the Jews were expecting! Is he the kind of king we are expecting?
How do we serve these least ones? We give them food, drink, welcome and clothe them, and visit them while ill or in prison. We must be like Christ the King, who came to serve, not be served. As disciples of Christ, we must show his love to others, for they, like we, are created in his image. Christ is in our neighbor and it is there that we can experience our King on a daily basis. Christ reveals his person to us in the person of others, especially the poor.

Who are the least of our brothers and sisters who we can serve here in Edmond? Some are the homebound who need us to bring them weekly Eucharist and a daily meal from Mobile Meals. Others are the financially poor whom volunteers serve from the St. Vincent de Paul Society. Those in hunger are served a free meal at Breakfast on Boulevard. Pregnant women in crisis are provided for by Birth Choice of Oklahoma. Our jails and prisons have people who want to hear about the love of God, a love some have never experienced from anyone. And the list goes on. There is a place waiting for you!

So to be prepared to meet our maker, we must love our neighbor and especially the poorest of them. Sometimes we have neighbors, even family, that we don’t like very much. Being prepared to meet Christ our King requires that we love them by helping them in their need, for whatever we do for them, we do for our King.

Let us pray for grace to better love our neighbor so that Christ our King will send us off on judgment day to eternal life.


Homily # 5

Matthew’s great parable of the last judgment present the glorified Son of Man, with an entourage of angels, rising before the nations of the world.  The blessed and lost are separated by one norm: the care of others.  “Inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the creation of the world.  For I was hungry and you gave me food, I was thirsty and you gave me drink.  I was stranger and you welcomed me, naked and you clothed me.  I was ill and you comforted me, in prison and you came to visit me.”

This proclamation is formulated four times in the course of the parable. It is worth the four repetitions.  For, like many gospel passages, we have heard the words so often that they seem ordinary, even though they are the most revolutionary claims about the human condition that have ever been made.

In all the ways that God has been revealed to high human consciousness, there has been one abiding theme: the dignity and value of the human person.  The ancient Chinese may have been among the first to formulate it: never do unto others what you would not have done to yourself.  Archaic Babylonian law commanded that we show good will to others.  The mighty Egyptians were told, “Terrorize not a human.”  Buddha reached enlightenment only when he embarked on the life of compassion for others.    And Jewish faith, parent of both Christianity and Islam, revealed the source of the truth, Male and female God created them; in God’s own image they were created.”

For Christians, this revelation of God reached its apex in the Incarnation: the Word of God became human flesh to save us.  Thus it is strategic that Matthew, immediately before the narrative of Jesus’ passion and death, presents the scene of the last judgment as a metaphor wherein the least human person is identified with the Lord of history.

On one level of interpretation, this parable is an indictment of humanity’s violent resistance to God’s revelation.  In our own century millions have been killed in the Middle East for the sake of homeland and nation.  Eleven million Hindus and Muslims were slaughtered at the dawn of India’s freedom.  Twenty-million were purged in Communist China.  The killing fields of Cambodia were marked by a million skulls.  Rwanda and Serbia still stink under waves of blood.

Before our own times entire tribes of indigenous peoples disappeared in North and South America, sacrificed to idols of gold.  Jews were banished or forcibly converted long before the abominable “final solution.”  Holy “religious” wars were launched in the name of God.  Children of every color and tribe have been traded and killed upon birth.

To such a bleak history, the Lord of history has spoken, “As often as you have done this to the least of my brothers and sisters, you have done it to me.”

Like all holy scripture, the parable of the ends times is a judgment on the world.  In human mayhem, we dismember the body of Christ.  “You have done it to me.”  The starving, the unwanted old and unborn, the criminal, the enemy —“the least” are Him.

This judgment of God is a moral command as well.  In the eyes of Christ’s followers, the bodies of the wounded and murdered are bodies of Christ”.  Thus, killing is sacrilege.  All wars are unholy.  Any “choice” to kill a human being is an ungodly act.

But the story is more radical yet.  For the parable not only judges history.  It calls us to active love.  It is an invitation to see Christ in each other.  In all  our relations we encounter God.  Spouses, children, neighbors all count as “the least.” Every wife who comforted her husband, every father who gave joy to his child, every friend who consoled a companion, every mother who fed the infant or held the dying has encountered the Lord.

We all bear the presence of the Most High, no matter how diminished or devalued we may seem.  We are bodies of Christ.  Every reception of Holy Communion reaffirms the truth:  Christ assumed our flesh as his own.

Scripture, in its greatest depth, does not merely present a moral challenge or a judgment of the world.  Nor is it a program for political or social action, or a self-help book.  It is, rather, a story of the mystery of salvation.

For at the end of history, Jesus Christ, the Word of God made human flesh, addresses also the one who went him: “Whatsoever you to the least of my brothers and sisters, you do unto me.”  These words that challenge us are the very words that save us.

What if, in our thinking, our praying, and our writing about scripture, we accepted it as if it were real?  What if the Word of God is actually true on all levels of our lives, true for a world of nations, politics, or economies; true for our relations with each other; true for each of us in our hearts, true of God?

If you and I accept, with all our mind and will, the promise of God’s Word. perhaps then we shall fully understand the soaring words of Paul: “Christ must reign until God has put all enemies under His feet and the last enemy to be destroyed is death.”

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Praying or serving Christian?

By FR. BEL R. SAN LUIS, SVD

THE parish council of a certain prosperous suburban community decided to renovate their old church to provide a worthy celebration of the liturgy.

When the leaders of a socially-conscious group working with the poor learned of the big project, they vigorously protested, saying, “It’s a scandal to beautify the surroundings while the poor are suffering from lack of shelter!”

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The leaders suggested that the money be used instead to finance social action projects like providing housing for squatters living at the fringes of the parish.

This incident, typical of present-day situations, illustrates two sharply opposed views of Christian faith: One we may call the vertical dimension; the other, horizontal.

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Those who hold the vertical view says that our religion has to do with God or with nothing at all. Their concern is the salvation and sanctification of souls. Prayer, meditation, receiving the sacraments, in the traditional sense, are the elements of the vertical view.

* * *

Proponents reason out that when the church talks too much about social justice, it defiles the sanctuary with worldly things, even bringing politics to the pulpit. “When we come to church on Sunday, we want to hear about ‘spiritual’ things,” they contend.

Advocates of the horizontal view, on the other hand, say it is a scandal for the church to build magnificent edifices when people nearby lack the basic necessities.

* * *

Jesus was the friend of the poor and the downtrodden; He went about preaching, curing the sick and doing good they claim. When we are judged, God will not ask us how kilometric our prayers and novenas are, but how much we have helped the “least of Christ’s brethren” (Mt 25:40).

Which of these two views is correct? Where does the true Christian stand?

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In the gospel of this 30th Sunday of the year, Jesus Christ is asked, “Which is the greatest commandment in the law?”

Jesus answers: “Love the Lord, your God, with all your heart…” But then he quickly adds, “The second is like it: You shall love your neighbor as yourself.”

The point Jesus is trying to stress is that we cannot separate love of God from love of neighbor. The two always go together.

* * *

As St. John the evangelist puts it, “If you say ‘I love God’ but hate your brother, then you are a liar.”

Authentic discipleship consists not in espousing one extreme view to the exclusion of the other but in the pursuit of both.

It is hard to understand, for instance, a “pious” Christian or Muslim who is prayerful but is unforgiving. I’m reminded of the story of a man who spread his mat at a corner of a hall and started to pray.

* * *

Just then an enemy of his happened to pass by. On seeing him, the man rose up, ran after him and beat him up. That done, he returned to his mat and piously resumed his praying.

Similarly, it is contradictory to see one who goes to church regularly but at the same time is harsh, unkind and merciless to his or her workers.

* * *

On the other hand, the danger arises when the horizontal is stressed so much that there is little or no room for personal prayer and the sacraments.

A group of college students were doing social work among the people in a depressed area. One day their supervisor came and ask them if they set aside time for prayer.

* * *

Their leader replied: “We feel there’s no need to pray because our work is our prayer.”

In Christ we find the vertical and the horizontal in wonderful harmony. He went about doing good: Healing the sick, teaching, comforting the forlorn and bereaved, but despite his busy schedule, he would go to some quiet, deserted place, like a mountain, to pray. (Read Mk 1:35).

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Ask yourself: Are you more of a worshipping Christian or serving one? Someone remarked that we have more worshippers than social-minded Christians. When we come together for prayer and meditation at Mass, it is often called “worship service.” But worship ends when the final blessing is pronounced, but the end of worship is the beginning of service.

Let’s strive to follow Christ’s will to love God and our neighbor. By the way, this is not an advice or suggestion but a command.

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Moments

At the service of Christ the King

By: Fr. Jerry M. Orbos
Philippine Daily Inquirer

11:20 pm | Saturday, November 19th, 2011

The story is told about a husband who was boasting to his friends: “You know, in my house I am the king, and whenever my wife and I have a quarrel, my wife does the kneeling!” Upon overhearing this, the wife said: “You know why I kneel down? I kneel down to look for him under our bed where he is hiding!”

* * *

Today is the Solemnity of Christ the King. Jesus reminds us that He, and He alone, is our King. Those of us who consider ourselves as kings, or act as wannabe kings would do well to remember that on judgment day, all of us will be judged not so much by our power, wealth, or stature, but by the good deeds we have done to one another.

* * *

Ever so often we encounter people who are loud and proud. They are a vexation to the spirit, and they turn us off. The best we can do is to try to understand that maybe they have an axe to grind, or have something to prove to others, or have some hidden need in their lives. What is sad about such people is that they cannot go beyond their personal agenda toward the bigger agenda, which is, love of neighbor and love of God.

* * *

We have seen it before, and we see it again: No one stays at the top forever. How futile are all our human efforts to hold on to power and influence, and hold on to life itself! Those who think of themselves or make of themselves kings or queens will sooner or later find out that earthly glory is passing and worldly power is fleeting. Save yourself and your family the trouble. The sooner you stop playing God, the better.

* * *

The Koreans have a beautiful custom of not harvesting all the fruits of a tree in autumn so that the birds will have something to eat in the forthcoming cold winter. This surely is an example worth emulating. They consider the needs of the helpless and the little ones. How much more should we, so-called Christians! We must be considerate, thoughtful, sensitive to the needs of the people around us, and respond generously. As subjects of Christ, the King of the universe, we must be on the lookout for ways and means to carry out His marching orders to serve people, and to preserve Mother Nature.

* * *

Christmas is just around the corner. As we busy ourselves to make Christmas happen in our own homes, please set aside something to make Christmas happen in the lives of other people. Remember the words of the Lord in today’s Gospel: “Amen, I say to you, whatever you did for one of the least brothers of mine, you did for Me.”

* * *

Please don’t forget that  Diakonia (service) is one of the main ingredients of true Christian life, the other two being Koinonia (prayer), and Kerygma (proclamation). All these three must be integrated in our day-to-day life. The best way to evaluate our Christian life is to kneel before Christ our King, and in humility ask Him how we are, and how we are doing.

May we learn to be open, obedient and docile to our King. Otherwise, what can happen is that we think we are, but we are not really serving Him.

* * *

When I think of humble and dedicated service, I can’t help but associate it with the late Bishop Artemio Rillera, SVD, DD, who passed away at the age of 69 in the morning of Nov. 13, 2011 due to acute asthma attack. He occupied high positions as provincial superior of the SVD Northern Province, as bishop of Abra and as bishop of La Union, and he remained humble and poor through it all. He was a superior who was never too administrative, proud, or condescending. He was such a simple, self-effacing, soft-spoken person, very personable and very approachable and accommodating. He had so much zeal and diligence, especially for the poor, the troubled, and the marginalized. I will not be surprised if “Manong” (as we fondly called him) who usually took public transport in his travels, was given the express train to heaven.

* * *

I remember one incident at our Mission House in Ubbog, Bangued, Abra. When I arrived, Manong in his usual white T-shirt was sweeping the floor. After greeting him, I told my driver to bring my bags up the second floor. Thinking that Manong was the janitor of the place, my driver, who did not know who he was, called him and ordered him to help carry the bags, which Manong dutifully did! Imagine the surprise and embarrassment of my driver when he found out during supper that Manong was the provincial superior of the SVD Northern Province! Thank you Manong for your fine example of selfless, humble, dedicated and joyful service. I can almost hear the Lord saying to him now: “Come, you blessed by My Father. Inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world.”

* * *

A moment with the Lord:

Lord, my King, help me to serve you truly, fully, humbly and joyfully while I am living. Amen.

opinion.inquirer.net/17591/at-the-service-of-christ-the-king

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Word Alive

Christ the King and Judge

By FR. BEL R. SAN LUIS, SVD

November 18, 2011, 11:35pm

MANILA, Philippines — Sunday is the feast of Christ the King. When Jesus was crucified, a wooden sign (caratola) was nailed over his head with the inscription INRI, which in Latin means “Iesus Nazarenus Rex Iudaeorum;” in English, “Jesus of Nazareth King of the Jews.”

By the way, among the people of Ilocos Norte like me, INRI also means “Ilocos Norte Region I,” making Jesus our kababayan.

* * *

Levity aside, is Christ really a king? Standing before Pilate, Christ did not deny that He was indeed a King. But then He said, “My kingdom does not belong to this world” (Jn 18:36). Jesus’ reply means He was not the kind of king Pilate imagined: A military or political ruler, but rather a spiritual ruler.

* * *

In this Sunday’s gospel, the figure that’s presented is a King who will judge us. He will decide on that final day who will or will not share His kingdom forever. It’s a dreadful scene. But for those who’re faithful to Jesus’ teachings, it will be a day of glory.

If you read carefully the parable of the Last Judgment (Mt. 25:31-46), you will notice that our judgment will not depend on our intelligence, good looks, fame or fortune, or even our kilometric prayers, important as they may be. We shall be asked one single question: “How much have you done or not done for people in need?”

* * *

Jesus as King will become visible in the last judgment but, according to the parable, He is already present among us – although hidden in the face of the poor, the hungry, the sick, the suffering.

The story is told about a Roman soldier Martin of Tours who lived in the 3rd century. One cold day as he was entering a city, a beggar stopped him and asked for alms. Martin had no money, and the beggar was shivering with cold. Martin took off his cloak, cut it in two and gave half of it to the beggar.

That night, in a dream, he saw Jesus wearing half of the Roman soldier’s cloak. Asked where He got it, Jesus replied, “My servant Martin gave it to Me.” The story illustrates graphically Christ’s words: “Whatever you did to the least of My brethren, you did for Me.”

* * *

Christ who “went about doing good” is our model for living. If we want to walk in His footsteps, we must look for opportunities to help people.

A Christian act may not be big or spectacular. It could mean finding time to visit old folks and relatives and listen to their “long-playing” stories; or being caring and understanding to members of the family despite their weaknesses. It could also mean providing our helpers and workers security for their old age like SSS or housing benefits.

* * *

It may not be the material and physical needs you address but the spiritual, like giving them time to attend religious activities like Sunday Mass or recollection.

If we want to enter Heaven, we have to do those acts of mercy. They might seem hard but that’s the only way we can become fully human and fulfill our destiny.

mb.com.ph/articles/341812/christ-king-and-judge

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TAKE HOME EXAM: Reflection for the Solemnity of Christ the King Year A – November 27, 2011

Kapistahan ngayon ni Kristong Hari. Ito ang hudyat ng katapusan ng taon ng Simbahan na nagpapaalala sa atin naman ng katapusan ng panahon. Isang malaking palaisipan pa rin sa atin kung ano nga ba ang mangyayari sa araw na ‘yon. Para tayong mga estudyanteng naghihintay sa araw ng pagsusulit na magkahalong takot at pangamba ang nasa puso kung ano ba ang lalabas na mga katanungan. Ngunit kung iisipin, ang takot sa pagsusulit ay para lamang sa mga estudyanteng hindi nag-aral at naghanda. Sa katunayan ay wala talaga tayong dapat katakutan sapagkat sa pagsusulit na ito ay ibinigay na sa atin ang katanungan. Ang ating exam ay “take home” at hindi “surprise test!” Kaya nga’t katangahan na lamang kung hindi pa natin ito maipapasa. At ano ang katanungan? Ito ang nilalaman ng ating pagbasa ngayon sa Ebanghelyo. May text message akong natanggap: “Sa isang bus. BOY: I hate it when I see a girl standing in a bus while I’m comfortably seated. GIRL: So what do you do? BOY: I just sleep… It hurts my feelings eh!” Madalas din bang masaktan ang iyong damdamin kapag nakakakita ka ng mga taong nangangailangan? Karaniwan ng tagpo marahil sa atin ang makakita ng lolang nagtitinda ng sampaguita sa harapan ng simbahan, o kaya nama’y mga pulubing may kapansanan na nakaharang sa daan, o mga batang gula-gulanit ang damit na haharang-harang sa daan at kakatok sa bintana ng iyong sasakyan. Anung nararamdaman mo kapag lumalapit sila? Napakadali silang iwasan, wag pansinin… dedmahin! Kung minsan nga nasisisi pa natin sila: tamad kasi! Ayaw magbanat ng buto! Buti nga sa kanila! Ngunit sa tuwing nababasa ko ang Ebanghelyo ng “huling paghuhukom” ay may takot na naghahari sa akin. Balikan natin ang mga salita ng Hukom: ‘Lumayo kayo sa akin, mga isinumpa! Kayo’y pasaapoy na di-mamamatay, na inihanda para sa diyablo at sa kanyang mga kampon. Sapagkat ako’y nagutom at hindi ninyo pinakain, nauhaw at hindi ninyo pinainom. Ako’y naging isang dayuhan at hindi ninyo pinatuloy; ako’y nawalan ng maisuot at hindi ninyo pinaramtan. Ako’y may sakit at nasa bilangguan at hindi ninyo dinalaw.’ Hindi ba’t sila rin ang mga taong nakakatagpo ko araw-araw? Bakit natatakot akong tulungan sila? Bakit nagdadalawang isip ako kung kikilos ako o hindi? Ang Kapistahan ng Kristong Hari ay muling nagpapaalala sa atin ng dalawang mahalagang dimensiyon ng ating buhay Kristiyano. Sa katunayan hindi sila magkahiwalay… magkadugtong sila. Ang tunay na pag-ibig kay Kristong ating hari ay dapat magdala sa atin sa tunay na pagmamahal sa kapwa nating nangangailangan. ‘Sinasabi ko sa inyo: nang pagkaitan ninyo ng tulong ang pinakahamak sa mga ito, ako ang inyong pinagkaitan.’ Wag sana nating paghiwalayin ang pagiging relihiyoso sa pagiging-tao. Ang pagiging maka-Diyos ay pagiging maka-tao din! Tunay kong mahal ang Diyos kung may pagmamalasakit ako sa kapwa kong nangangailangan. Nawa ay pagharian ng pagmamahal ni Kristong Hari ang ating mga puso ng sa gayon ay maging bukas ito sa paglilingkod at ng mapagharian tayo ng kanyang pag-ibig. Mabuhay si Kristo na ating hari!

kiliti-ng-diyos.blogspot.com/

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SOLEMNITY OF CHRIST THE KING: A GREAT ASSEMBLY TO EXPECT

Mt 25:31-46

THE CELEBRATION OF the Solemnity of Christ the King simply intensifies our hopes of Christ’s coming in glory. Our readings for today are worth pondering because these talk about some themes of the end-time.

The first theme that the readings give is one of an assembly or a gathering. In the gospel, we have heard that the end-time is marked by an assembly of all the nations. On human terms, a gathering or an assembly is something that we would look forward to. It is an event that we exert efforts for preparation, and at the same time, an event in which we put our hopes and expectations. We have nothing to hope but a success of the gathering. Similarly, the gathering in the end-time is something we look forward to because this must be the fulfillment of what Jesus once preached, that is, the Kingdom of God. The “gathering of the nations” would be a spectacular event, for sure. What makes it more amazing is the fact that all will be in communion with Christ.

The second theme is one of judgment. The first reading and the gospel both talk about the separation “of rams and goats,” “of sheep and goats.” Here, there can be a different feeling. On the first theme (i.e., assembly) there is a kind of excitement, expectation, and joy. But here, on the second theme, there could be an element of fear and anxiety because of the separation, because of the coming judgment. In human experiences of court cases, the “day of judgment” is something that people cannot easily handle. There is never an excitement. What they could have instead are worries, and fear. In a word, it is something negative. We could have the same feelings on the coming of this day of judgment. However, we are given an idea by the Lord that the key to dispelling these worries and anxieties is service. Service is defined or understood as love-in-action. If we have loved and served others then there is nothing to worry about. There is only one enemy or hindrance to service. That is, selfishness. A person who is selfish can never serve or love others because his world is also confined with his own world. But a person who starts “going out” of himself is a person who is capable to serve and to love.

Third, it is important to reflect on who is this God who will stand before us on the judgment day. Christ is not a mere judge. Christ, according to the second reading, will stand as King and Lord. In fact, everything will be subjected to him. Acknowledging him as Lord would mean allowing him to rule over our life. Indeed, he is the master of our life.

Today’s solemnity is a good reminder for us to correct our relationship with God. Christ is King and Lord and he should always remain as such. However, in real life, there are instances wherein we allow other people, other things, or even our own selves to rule over us. We allow others, other things, and our own selves to be masters of our life. In these cases, Christ has been totally out of the picture. Again, if we believe that Christ is the King, then, let us allow him to rule over our life. We surrender our life to Him.

msp.org.ph/homilies.do?id=19366

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Feast of Christ the King, Year A—November 23, 2014

– NOVEMBER 17, 2014POSTED IN: A, FEATURED, ORDINARY TIME, SUNDAY LECTIONARY READINGS

Today, Jesus turns from parable to prophecy. How have the parables prepared us for this prophecy?

By Gayle Somers

Gospel (Read Mt 25:31-46)

On this Feast of Christ the King, the last Sunday of the liturgical calendar, the Church gives us a Gospel reading that looks back and looks ahead (something we often routinely do at the end of our calendar year). Our readings lately in St. Matthew have taught us that Jesus, like the bridegroom and the master in the parables of the virgins and the talents, will return. We have understood from both of them that His return will precipitate an accounting (Have we been wise? Have we been faithful stewards of His graces?) Today, Jesus describes this future event, no longer using stories to make His point. Yet the lessons from those parables, instructing us to be rich in the good works that come from our faith in Him, pervade His description of it. What in it seems familiar?

First, we notice that in both the parables of the virgins and talents, there was an invitation given. At the wedding feast, after a long delay, a cry went up, “Behold, the bridegroom. Come out to meet him!” (Mt 25:6) In the parable of the talents, also after a long delay, the faithful servants heard from their master, “Come, share your master’s joy!” (Mt 25:21) Today, as Jesus describes His return as the Son of Man who sits on a throne (yes, after a long delay), with “all the nations…assembled before Him,” the righteous will hear, “Come, you who are blessed by My Father. Inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world.” The parables prepared us for this final invitation the Lord will extend to the righteous in “all nations.” Why do they receive the invitation? It is because throughout their lives, in response to their faith in Jesus, they took seriously His teaching about love of neighbor. They understand that true love of God must express itself in true love of neighbor. Any love of God that neglects neighbor is the kind Jesus constantly warned us about in the Gospels, in His many run-ins with the Pharisees. It is empty and hypocritical.

Next, notice that both the righteous and the accursed have trouble remembering actually seeing Jesus. They seem to have no sense of having cared for or neglected Him. They simply lived their lives according to their allegiances. The righteous cared about following Jesus and so heeded His words. Jesus counts their actions as having been done for Him, too, so closely does He identify Himself with people for whom He died. The “accursed” neglected or ignored others. Their allegiance was to themselves. They are shocked that in their self-absorption, they were blind to Jesus. In the end, they go to the place of utter, relentless self-absorption, an “eternal punishment.”

What a timely reading this is for us as we end one liturgical year and begin another! We are reminded of the inevitability of Christ’s return and our day of reckoning. We have our imaginations full of the many stories and teachings Jesus has given us in this past year to live our faith in Him, to be doers of the Word, not just hearers. No matter what we find in ourselves as we review our readiness to see Jesus, now is the time to check our allegiance. With Whom do we want to spend eternity? A babe and His mother will soon invite us to the side of a manger. May we be ready to answer their call to, “Come!”

Possible response: Lord Jesus, help me to really believe that the best way I can prepare to see You is to see You now in my neighbor.

First Reading (Read Eze 34:11-12, 15-17)

This prophecy was written by Ezekiel during the time when Judah was in captivity in Babylon, about 592-570 B.C. Judah was in exile there because of the complete collapse of the kings who sat on David’s throne in Jerusalem. Although there were a few good kings from time to time, most of them broke faith with Israel’s covenant with God, often practicing idolatry and making alliances with foreign powers to protect them from enemies, instead of trusting God. Kings in Israel were supposed to be like the shepherd-king, David, described in Scripture as “a man after God’s own heart” (1 Samuel 13:13-14). By the time of the Exile, so utterly had the kings failed that God vows: “I Myself will look after and tend My sheep.” The LORD goes on to describe Himself as the Good Shepherd, Who cares lovingly for His sheep, pasturing and protecting them, seeking out the lost and healing the injured. We know, of course, that this is a prophecy of the Incarnation. Jesus, the Son of David and true Shepherd-King, fulfills all these promises made so long ago: “I am the Good Shepherd. The Good Shepherd lays down His life for the sheep” (Jn 10:11).

 

Notice that Ezekiel speaks of a coming judgment of the sheep and goats, just as Jesus did in our Gospel reading. The idea of a final judgment was not new in Israel. That is why Jesus, Who called Himself by the same name God gave Ezekiel, “Son of Man,” uses this prophecy to describe the separation of sheep from goats at the end of time. God has long prepared His people for this event in salvation history. He is still preparing us now, if we have ears to hear.

Possible response: Heavenly Father, thank You for not leaving Your sheep without a shepherd. Every bishop’s staff reminds me of Your love.

Psalm (Read Ps 23:1-3; 5-6)

The psalm picks up the theme of Ezekiel’s prophecy and Jesus’ fulfillment of it: “The LORD is my shepherd; there is nothing I shall want.” How ironic that David, the first shepherd-king of Israel, wrote a beautiful poem that recognized the LORD as his own Shepherd. Even before the Incarnation, David experienced God’s loving kindness and protection in his life, making the comparison with how a good shepherd cares for his sheep. On this Feast of Christ the King, let us remember that Jesus will one day return as King over all the nations (He already rules as King in His Church) with a shepherd’s tender heart, and He will call His sheep to “dwell in the house of the LORD for years to come.”

Possible response: The psalm is, itself, a response to our other readings. Read it again prayerfully to make it your own.

Second Reading (Read 1 Cor 15:20-26, 28)

St. Paul fills out for us some more details of the return of Christ the King at the end of time. He tells us that not only will all those “who belong to Christ” be brought to eternal life, but all God’s enemies will be thoroughly vanquished—“every sovereignty and every authority and power.” The last of His enemies to be destroyed will be death itself. If we ever wonder why Jesus is taking so long to return, we can surmise that it has something to do with the royal battle happening now that is knocking out His enemies. We might be tempted to think, as we look around us, that it doesn’t look like the kingdom’s enemies are being defeated. However, did it look like sin, death, and the devil had been dealt a mortal blow while Jesus hung on the Cross? Looks can be deceiving.

When all has been accomplished, Jesus will hand over the kingdom to His God and Father. That is when His own will hear the words we long for: “Come, you who are blessed by My Father. Inherit the kingdom prepared for you from the foundation of the world.”

King Jesus, come!

Possible response: Lord Jesus, help me never to doubt the victory of goodness, truth, and life that You have already won.

corardens.com/blog/2014/11/17/feast-of-christ-the-king-year-a-november-23-2014/

*********************************************************************************************************

Christ the king & judge

by Fr. Bel R. San Luis, SVD
November 21, 2014

Tomorrow is the feast of Christ the King. When Jesus was crucified, a wooden sign (caratola) was nailed over his head with the inscription INRI, which in Latin means “Iesus Nazarenus Rex Iudaeorum”; in English “Jesus of Nazareth King of the Jews.”

By the way, among the people of Ilocos Norte like me, INRI also means “Ilocos Norte Region I,” making Jesus their kababayan.

* * *

Levity aside, is Christ really a king? Standing before Pilate, Christ did not deny that he was indeed a king. But then he said, “My kingdom does not belong to this world” (Jn 18,36). Jesus’ reply means he was not the kind of king Pilate imagined: a military or political ruler, but rather a spiritual ruler.

* * *

In this Sunday’s gospel, the figure that’s presented is a king who will judge us. He will decide on that final day who will or will not share his kingdom forever. It’s a dreadful scene. But for those who’re faithful to Jesus’ teachings, it will be a day of glory.

* * *

If you read carefully the parable of the Last Judgment (Mt. 25, 31-46), you will notice that our judgment will not depend on our intelligence, good looks, fame or fortune, nor even our long prayers. Obviously, these are important but they should be put at the service of the “least, last, and lost” of society. Hence, the question we shall be asked: How much have you done or not done for them?

* * *

Jesus as king will become visible in the last judgment but, according to the parable, he is already present among us–although hidden in the face of the poor, the hungry, the sick, the suffering.

The story is told about a Roman soldier Martin of Tours who lived in the 3rd century.

* * *

One cold day as he was entering a city, a beggar stopped him and asked for alms. Martin had no money, and the beggar was shivering cold. Martin took off his cloak, cut it in two and gave half of it to the beggar.

* * *

That night, in a dream, he saw Jesus wearing half of the Roman soldier’s cloak. Asked where he got it, Jesus replied, “My servant Martin gave it to me.” The story illustrates graphically Christ’s words: “Whatever you did to the least of my brethren, you did for me.”

* * *

Christ who “went about doing good” is our model for living. If we want to walk in his footsteps, we must look for opportunities to help people.

A Christian act may not be big or spectacular. It could mean finding time to visit old folks and relatives and listen to their “long-playing” stories; or being caring and understanding to members of the family despite their weaknesses. It could also mean providing our helpers and workers security for their old age like SSS or housing benefits.

* * *

If we want to enter Heaven, we have to do acts of mercy. It’s not that easy but that’s the only way we can become fully human and fully Christian.

mb.com.ph/christ-the-king-judge/

*********************************************************************************************************

ANG HARI NG AWA AT HABAG : Reflection for the SOLEMNITY OF CHRIST THE KING Year A – November 23, 2014 – YEAR OF THE LAITY

Kapistahan ngayon ni Kristong Hari. Ito ang hudyat ng katapusan ng taon ng Simbahan na nagpapaalala sa atin naman ng katapusan ng panahon. Isang malaking palaisipan pa rin sa atin kung ano nga ba ang mangyayari sa araw na ‘yon.  Para tayong mga estudyanteng naghihintay sa araw ng pagsusulit na magkahalong takot at pangamba ang nasa puso kung ano ba ang lalabas na mga katanungan. Ngunit kung iisipin, ang takot sa pagsusulit ay para lamang sa mga estudyanteng hindi nag-aral at naghanda.  Sa katunayan ay wala talaga tayong dapat katakutan sapagkat sa pagsusulit na ito ay ibinigay na sa atin ang katanungan. Ang ating exam ay “take home” at hindi “surprise test!” Kaya nga’t katamaran at katangahan na lamang kung hindi pa natin ito maipapasa. At ano ang katanungan?  Ito ang nilalaman ng ating pagbasa ngayon sa Ebanghelyo. May text message akong natanggap: “Sa isang bus. BOY: I hate it when I see a girl standing in a bus while I’m comfortably seated. GIRL: So what do you do? BOY: I just sleep… It hurts my feelings eh!”  Madalas din bang masaktan ang iyong damdamin kapag nakakakita ka ng mga taong nangangailangan ng tulong? Karaniwan ng tagpo marahil sa atin ang makakita ng lolang nagtitinda ng sampaguita sa harapan ng simbahan, o kaya nama’y mga pulubing may kapansanan na nakaharang sa daan, o mga batang gula-gulanit ang damit na haharang-harang sa daan at kakatok sa bintana ng iyong sasakyan.  Anung nararamdaman mo kapag lumalapit sila?  Napakadali silang iwasan, wag pansinin at dedmahin na parang wala kang nakikita at naririnig! Kung minsan nga nasisisi pa natin sila na tamad at umaasa na lamang sa awa ng iba.   Ayaw magbanat ng buto kaya’t kuntento na lamang sa pahingi-hingi!   Ngunit sa tuwing nababasa ko ang Ebanghelyo ng “huling paghuhukom” ay may takot na naghahari sa akin. Balikan natin ang mga salita ng Hukom: ‘Lumayo kayo sa akin, mga isinumpa! Kayo’y pasaapoy na di-mamamatay, na inihanda para sa diyablo at sa kanyang mga kampon. Sapagkat ako’y nagutom at hindi ninyo pinakain, nauhaw at hindi ninyo pinainom. Ako’y naging isang dayuhan at hindi ninyo pinatuloy; ako’y nawalan ng maisuot at hindi ninyo pinaramtan. Ako’y may sakit at nasa bilangguan at hindi ninyo dinalaw.’ Hindi ba’t sila rin ang mga taong nakakatagpo ko araw-araw?  Bakit natatakot akong tulungan sila?  Bakit nagdadalawang isip ako kung kikilos ba ako o hindi? Ang Kapistahan ng Kristong Hari ay muling nagpapaalala sa atin ng dalawang mahalagang dimensiyon ng ating buhay Kristiyano. Sa katunayan hindi sila magkahiwalay… magkadugtong sila. Ang tunay na pag-ibig kay Kristong ating hari ay dapat magdala sa atin sa tunay na pagmamahal sa kapwa nating nangangailangan. ‘Sinasabi ko sa inyo: nang pagkaitan ninyo ng tulong ang pinakahamak sa mga ito, ako ang inyong pinagkaitan.’ Wag sana nating paghiwalayin ang pagiging relihiyoso sa pagiging-tao. Ang pagiging maka-Diyos ay pagiging maka-tao din! Tunay kong mahal ang Diyos kung may pagmamalasakit ako sa kapwa kong nangangailangan.  Anga pagbisita ng ating mahal na Santo Papa sa taong darating ay magdadala sa atin ng AWA at HABAG ng Diyos.  Sa katunayan ay ito ng tema ng kanyang pagbisita:  “Mercy and Compassion”.  Nais niyang ipadama sa ating mga kapatid na nabiktima ng bagyong Yolanda na may Diyos na hindi nakakalimot at umaalalay sa kanila.  At para sa ating lahat, ito dapat ay magbigay ng patuloy na inspirasyon sa ating mga “ningas-kugon” na puso.  Ang pag-ibig ng Diyos ay dapat magpatuloy kahit mahigit isang taon na ang nakalipas ng maganap ang trahedya.  Muli nating buhayin at pag-alabin ang init ng Kanyang pagmamahal. Nawa ay pagharian ng pagmamahal ni Kristong Hari ang ating mga puso ng sa gayon ay maging bukas ito sa paglilingkod at ng mapagharian tayo ng kanyang pag-ibig. MABUHAY SI KRISTO NA ATING HARI… ANG HARI NG AWA AT HABAG! Ipinaskil ni kalakbay ng kabataan

kiliti-ng-diyos.blogspot.com/2014/11/ang-hari-ng-awa-at-habag-reflection-for.html

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See Today’s Readings:  Cycle A

Back to: Solemnity of Christ the King (Year A)

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