Thursday of the 33rd Week of the Year

Luke 19:41-44

The Lament for Jerusalem

OTHER HOMILY SOURCES:

In October 1996, I had the chance to visit Jerusalem. At the foot of the Temple wall I was able to walk through a newly open excavation. It was a strange feeling to stroll along the very street which King Herod had built for a better access to the Temple. A beautiful street, paved with huge, smooth marble slabs. If we only had such streets in Manila, I thought.

But at several places this beautiful street is destroyed by huge boulders. They were pushed down when the Romans destroyed the temple in 70 AD, one after another, until not one stone was left upon another – just as Jesus had predicted it 40 years earlier. It was a hair-raising experience to walk through the fulfillment of Jesus prophecy.

Jesus could not agree with the political intrigues and violent rebellion many Jews contemplated against mighty Rome which would end in destruction. He offered another way, a way of conversion, humility and peace. But his offer was rejected. And he wept thinking of the unspeakable miseries his blinded people were inviting.

In our times, God must be weeping daily when he sees the unnecessary miseries, pains and hurts his children are suffering in our country and all over the world. These sufferings are mostly caused by ignoring God or by foolish rebellion against his will. And so they suffer hunger and poverty, kidnapping and rape, murder by drug addicts and drunkards. There is so much needless miseries in our families because of infidelities and lack of effort to understand or forgive each other.

Christ has shown us the way out of these miseries. But like the people of Jerusalem we ignore him and prefer to go our own ways. And God weeps over us.

The boulders at the foot of the Temple in Jerusalem are the petrified tears of God. May not the day come when archaeologists will excavate our cities because we also “did not recognize the time of our visitation.” (Fr. Rudy Horst, SVD Bible Diary 2004)

*********************************************************

In October, 1996, I had the chance to visit Jerusalem. At the foot of the Temple wall I was able to walk through a newly opened excavation. It was strange feeling to stroll along the very street which King Herod had built to have a better access to the Temple, a beautiful street paved with huge, smooth marble slabs. If we only had such streets in Manila, I thought.

But at several places this beautiful street is destroyed by huge boulders.  They were pushed down when the Romans destroyed the Temple in 70 AD, one after another, until not one stone was left upon another, just as Jesus foretold in today’s gospel.

Jesus could not agree with the political intrigues and violent rebellion many Jews contemplated against mighty Rome which would end in destruction. He offered another way, a way of conversion, humility and peace. But His offer was rejected. And he wept thinking of the unspeakable miseries His blinded people were inviting.

In our times, God must be weeping daily when he sees the unnecessary miseries, pains and hurts His children are suffering in our country and all over the world. And so they suffer hunger and poverty, kidnapping and rape, murder by drug addicts and drunkards. There is so much needless misery in our families because of infidelities and lack of effort to understand or forgive each other.

Christ has shown us the way out of these miseries. But like the people of Jerusalem we ignore Him and prefer to go our own ways. And God weeps over us.

The boulders at the foot of the Temple in Jerusalem are petrified tears of God. May not the day come when archaeologists will excavate our cities and conclude that we also “did not recognize the time of our visitation. (Fr. Rudy Horst, SVD Bible Diary 2005)

**********************************************************

The ancient city of Pompei in Italy was destroyed when the volcano Vesuvius erupted on August 24, 79 AD only nine years after Jerusalem had been destroyed by the Romans. It remained virtually intact under the volcanic ash. Most of it has now been excavated, and tourists can walk through the streets like the local people at the time of Jesus. Visitors can see all the trappings of the everyday life and concerns that occupied the minds of the people right up to the very moment of their annihilation. Vesuvius still broods menacingly over the area, massive and ugly and yet majestic. I visited the site 1,920 years after the destruction of the city, armed with knowledge and hindsight which the residents did not have. Just as Jesus lamented the imminent destruction of Jerusalem, I saw Pompei in the light of its fate.

Archeologists have made casts of bodies by pouring liquid cement into the hollows formed in the ash when the bodies disintegrated and some of these ‘statues’ are on display. I was shocked by the expression of horror on the face of one man as he tried to flee, knowing that this was hopeless.

Jesus weeps because of His love for the city of Jerusalem and His wish for what might have been. The people’s lack of recognition of God in their lives and their preoccupation with themselves alone will make for the destruction of the city, which will come after their attempted total destruction of Jesus Himself.

Do we let our ‘urgent’ activities and amusements push Jesus to the side, as the people of Jerusalem seem to have done? Most of the opposition to Jesus and His disciples would appear not to be deliberate opposition to God but rather counteraction or defensive measures against what was seen as a threat to public order or people’s comfort zones.

The selfish, secularized culture of Jerusalem and Pompei were destroyed, but we know with hindsight that if we stay with Jesus we will not be destroyed because Jesus conquered death and we can too, as He is still with us today. If only we could put Jesus first in our lives! (Fr. Alan Meechan, SVD Bible Diary 2008)

***********************************************************

Yes, I can say, “I was there.” I had the privilege of being in the place marked Dominus Flevit, a word in Latin which means, “On this place the Lord wept.” I think, it was on a slope in Mount Hebron, overlooking the City of Jerusalem.

Bible scholars tell us that Jesus wept only two times in the Bible: the first was on the occasion when He saw the future destruction of the City of Jerusalem; the second, when Lazarus, the brother of Mary and Martha, died.

We can say that Jesus was not weak in the face of sufferings. He did not shed a tear when they scourged Him mercilessly; he did not weep when carrying the heavy cross, nor did he emotionally give way when He was hanging on the cross.

But with others, Jesus was emotionally demonstrative. He sympathized with people He loved, people He cared for but did not respond to His call, or people who did not give value to the good God had done for them. Such was the case when Jesus wept, while He was contemplating over Jerusalem, her coldness to God’s care and her impeding destruction. This weeping of Jesus would reveal to us that He was truly human, but he was also God be He rose from the dead by His own power (John 10:17-18).

Empathy, not just sympathy, is one of the qualities of a genuine Christian; it is not just a Feeling for others but putting oneself in the place of another. St. Paul, the great missionary apostle, mentions this along with other essential qualities in one of his letters: “Bless those who persecute; bless and do not wish evil on anyone. Rejoice with those who are joyful; and weep with those who weep. Live in peace with one another. Do not dream of extraordinary thing; be humble and do not hold yourselves wise,” (Rom 12:14-16).

St. Thomas Aquinas, one of the wisest theologians the Catholic Church ever had, mentions about the psychological meaning of weeping or crying in one of his writings, Summa Thologica. First, he posed the question, “What would you advice a woman who is about to cry?” his answer: “You should let her cry, for nothing gives her the greatest pleasure at the moment than to cry.” (Fr. Erasio Flores, SVD Bible Diary 2009)

****************************************************

November 17, 2016Thursday

Jesus lamented over Jerusalem. This is the context of our gospel today. Like Jesus, we as a Filipino people, also have our share of lamentations. We lamented over issues like PDAF and BSP, over the merciless killing of the 44 PNP-SAF members. We lamented because we know we have more as a nation but we get less as a people.

In the gospel, Jesus lamented because the people to whom He was sent to redeem did not listen to Him. They continued to be deaf and blind to his prodding to change, to repent and to recognize Him as the Son of God.

Thus, as Jesus lamented over the unbelief of the people, we should do likewise until our leaders listen and institute reforms for the betterment of our society and the common good. Let us not forget that Jesus fought all forms of oppression because He wanted His people to live happily in peace, prosperity, and justice.

Lamentation for its own sake does nothing good. Jesus really wants as to do our part as he did by His good actions and by being a good citizen. Remember, He paid his taxes too!

Finally, as Jesus lamented and did good deeds, He also prayed hard that these may bring true peace, prosperity and justice to all. These values are an experience of heaven on earth, a partaking of the Kingdom of God in our lifetime. (Fr. Ross Heruela, SVD | DWIMS, Tagaytay City Bible Diary 2016)

rveritas-asia.org/daily-reflection/1019-november-17-2016thursday

**********************************************************

November 22, 2012

St. Cecilia, virgin and martyr
(M) RED

Rv 5:1-10
Ps 149
Lk 19:41-44

Lk 19:41-44
The Lament for Jerusalem

41As he drew near [to Jerusalem], [Jesus] saw the city and wept over it, 42saying, “If this day you only knew what makes for peace—but now it is hidden from your eyes. 43For the days are coming upon you when your enemies will raise a palisade against you; they will encircle you and hem you in on all sides. 44They will smash you to the ground and your children within you, and they will not leave one stone upon another within you because you did not recognize the time of your visitation.”

REFLECTION:

The time of your visitation. Jerusalem in Hebrew means peace. Jesus weeps because the holy city fails to live up to its name. The inhabitants reject Jesus, the messenger sent by God. Despite the wondrous miracles Jesus has done, the people fail to recognize the time of God’s visitation. Jesus foresees the forthcoming destruction of the city whose people reject the Gospel values and ways of non-violence.

Truly human at the same time he is God the Son, Jesus shows the pain in his heart. The people persist in their hardness of heart and stubborn minds. They maintain their old ways and reject the Messiah of peace. War indeed comes to people whose options do not include the ways of peace.

Jesus may be weeping for us now. When life is not respected, when babies are rejected and aborted, when the sanctity of marriage is violated, when couples resort to contraception—yes, Jesus still weeps when we reject his Gospel and evangelical values.

Jesus’ lament echoes the sorrow of God that stems from his great love for his people.
Are you one with God in this sorrow for the sins of men and women?

ssp.ph/index.php/online-resources/366-days-with-the-lord/2043-november-22-2012

********************************************************

Beyond the historically touching account about Jesus shedding over Jerusalem, we come to realize the following:

  • Jesus loves us! John noted in his Gospel that Jesus wept for the death of Lazarus because He truly loved Lazarus as a dear friend. Lament touches us when something or someone that is involved is dear to our hearts. We never cry over anyone or anything that we are never attached to. If Jesus wept over the people of Jerusalem, it was because He genuinely desired their good and their salvation. Jesus’ tears give us a precious glimpse of what is in the heart of Jesus, and in the heart of God. God is Love. God loves humanity – that includes you and me.
  • Our peace is Jesus. Jesus is the Prince of Peace. Through His preaching, through His mighty works, through His grace of forgiveness and through the Sacraments, Jesus visits us with His peace, with His Divine assurances, no matter what. This is true It is the fruit of God’s intervention in our life and history.

But true peace is in the heart, inside us. True peace cannot be without spirituality and transcendence. (Fr. Domie Guzman, New Every Morning New Everyday, 2006:333-334).

*********************************************************

Wednesday, November 18, 2015

THURSDAY OF THE 33RD WEEK IN ORDINARY TIME (YEAR B) – LUKAS 19:41-44. UNSA MAN ANG MAGHATAG OG KALINAW SA ATONG KINABUHI? Nagpadulong sila sa Jerusalem, ug sa dihang nakita ni Hesus ang siyudad, nakahilak siya ug nakapamulong: “Kon nasayod ka pa unta kon unsa ang gikinahanglan alang sa kalinaw!’”. Gihilakan ni Hesus ang katawhan sa Jerusalem tungod kay nagdumili sila sa pagdawat sa Mesiyas; wala nila nakita ang Dios diha Kaniya, nga mao unta ang magdala og kalinaw sa ilang kinabuhi. Tungod sa pagdumili sa grasya sa Dios, ang siyudad sa Jerusalem nabungkag sa tuig 70 AD ubos sa gahum sa mga Romanhon. Ang nahitabo sa Jerusalem mahimo nga pahimangno para kanato. Dawaton gayod nato si Kristo diha sa atong kaugalingon, pamilya ug katilingban aron atong makab-ot ang tinuod nga kalipay, kalamboan ug kalinaw. Sakto ang caption: “No Jesus, no peace. Know Jesus, know peace.” Posted by Abet Uy

abetuy.blogspot.com/2015/11/thursday-of-33rd-week-in-ordinary-time.html

***********************************************************

Tuesday, November 17, 2015

Reflection for November 19, Thursday of the Thirty-third Week in Ordinary Time: Luke 19:41-44

Reflection: What will happen to us if we refuse to hear the wise counsel of our elders? For example, if we are advised to stop our vicious vices or to stop doing something which is immoral or wrong? If we continue to refuse to hear their wise counsel. Eventually these vices and the wrongdoing/s that we continue to do will take us down through sickness, embarrassment and so forth.

In the gospel for today, Jesus wept over Jerusalem and its people for they refused to hear His call of repentance and reform in their lives. Not only that they refused to listen to Jesus they also refused to listen to the prophets who were sent before Jesus. They instead mired themselves in sin similar to a beast miring itself in a pool of poisonous mud.

When we refuse to let Jesus come into our life and when we continue to refuse to hear His call of repentance. There would surely be no peace within us no matter how rich we are, how powerful we are. For as long as we refuse to hear His call we will have no peace we would still be living complicated lives that may eventually destroy us.

Jerusalem did not find peace and were destroyed by the Romans during the first revolt in A.D 70, because they refused Jesus, they did not recognized Him as the ultimate peace bearer. They instead continued to stray far from Him.

Jesus is always knocking in our hearts, always begging us to open our life to Him. For the reason that he will not only bring us peace He would also bring us contentment, serenity and other things that this world cannot give us.

If today you hear His voice  harden not your hearts. (Psalm 95) (Hebrew 3:15). – Marino J. Dasmarinas

mjdasma.blogspot.com/2015/11/reflection-for-november-19-thursday-of.html

********************************************************

GOD IS NEAR – As Jesus drew near, he saw the city and wept over it… – Luke 19:41

“Lola, para po sa inyo (Grandma, this is for you).” With her back turned on me, without looking, without a word, she grabbed the plastic bag containing a shirt and shawl. She was an old beggar who sat by the church door every day. Traces of life’s hardship are evident on her face. I felt the pain of compassion for her as she took the plastic bag. I saw a woman so used to receiving alms, and yet still eager to receive. She must have had experienced so many rejections already.

Poverty is like an enemy that crushes people’s hearts. It takes away peace in one’s being. Though the shirt and shawl may just be a little help for her, may they give her comfort and warmth during cold nights. May they bring her even just a taste of joy and peace within, and may she recognize God’s love through them.

Jesus draws near to each of us. Maybe not in the way we think. But each time He comes nearer, may we recognize Him and may He find an open heart ready to receive the love and peace He brings. Ma. Luisa De la Cruz (theessence_byluisa@yahoo.com)

Reflection: How open is your heart for Jesus? As He draws near to you, will He be pleased with what He will find there?

Dear Holy Spirit, cleanse my heart and open my eyes that I may always recognize Jesus. As He comes nearer to me, may I be drawn to Him. Amen.

kerygmafamily.com/modules/dailyreadings/read.php?date=2015-11-19

**********************************************************

HAVE YOU SEEN WHAT YOU’RE LOOKING FOR? – Question: Have you seen Stevie Wonder’s house?

Answer: Neither has he. Stevie Wonder is blind.

It is possible to have something right in front of you and still not be able to see it.

There are only two occasions where the Gospels record Jesus weeping: at the death of his friend Lazarus (see John 11:35) and in today’s Gospel. Coming within sight of the city of Jerusalem, Jesus wept over it (v. 41).

Today, Jesus beheld Jerusalem and wept over it. He wept for its failure to recognize the presence and see the manifestations of the Kingdom of God right in her midst. Jerusalem was waiting for the Messiah when, right in front of her, is the Kingdom of God personified in Jesus.

I once saw a poster showing Superman on one side and Clark Kent on the other. At the bottom it read: “Many girls dream of meeting Superman but walk past Clark Kent every day.” We dream of God manifesting Himself to us in a Superman-kind-of-way, in the process missing the many Clark Kents He sends our way. The world waited for a Messiah, but all it got was a “baby.”

What is my point? We ask for God’s blessings but oftentimes we want God to give it the way we want them, on our terms, on our conditions, on our calendar, according to our specifications.

Remember the story of the village guy who lost his house in a fire and prayed to God for help? When an ax fell from heaven, he ranted at God saying, “Are you mocking me? I didn’t ask for an ax!” God replied saying, “I sent you an ax so you can begin cutting trees and build yourself a house.” God’s blessings don’t always come the way we want them packaged. There is no doubt about it. God will manifest His providence and power. We just have to trust and sharpen our eyes to recognize the many Clark Kents He sends our way. Fr. Joel Jason

REFLECTION QUESTION: Have you been impatient and discouraged lately? Might not really be a case of God being silent, but you being blind.

Open our eyes, Lord. We want to see Jesus. To reach out and touch Him. And say that we love Him. Amen.

kerygmafamily.com/modules/dailyreadings/read.php?date=2015-11-19

*************************************************************

TOUGH LOVE – “If this day you only knew what makes for peace – but now it is hidden from your eyes.” – Luke 19:42

Janna lived a charmed life. So it was a big surprise to everybody who knew her when she traded that for an “adventurous” life characterized by lawlessness, homelessness and reckless abandon. Her reason? “Just because.”

Her devastated parents managed a few times to convince her to come back home but it became a tiresome hide-and-seek game for them — home today, gone again tomorrow — until tough love kicked in. Her parents told her that if she ran away again, she could no longer come back or seek their help in any way.

Jesus wept for the people of Jerusalem who did not welcome Him. Because of this, Jesus declared upon the city a calamity from which they will not be saved. This is the price they had to pay for not heeding the Messiah’s message of deliverance.

There is a consequence to every wrong choice that we make in life, and things can get really messy if we are not prepared to face  them. Yet there are those who choose this desolate path. Today’s Gospel reminds me of Janna, who settled for the consequences. Nova A. Sevilla (nova.svp@gmail.com)

Reflection: “And all these blessings shall come upon you and overtake you, if you obey the voice of the Lord your God.” (Deuteronomy 28:2)

May I always hear Your voice and heed Your call, O Lord. I want to walk with You all my life.

kerygmafamily.com/modules/dailyreadings/read.php?date=2016-11-17

**************************************************************

November 19, 2015

Thursday of the 33rd Week in Ordinary Time

1Mac 2:15-29, Lk 19:41-44

Be totally detached and totally involved

The Book of Maccabees continues to narrate the Jewish struggle to preserve their culture and religion from the onslaught of the Greek culture and their pagan religion. We could observe a gradual change in the attitude and approach of the Jews towards their foreign oppressors. It evolved from fear to reverence and then to sympathy and antipathy. Gradually passive resistance gave way to active defiance and then violence and rebellion surfaced. In today’s episode we find Mattathias killing a fellow Jew who yielded to the intimidation of their oppressor and also slaying the king’s envoy. He then gathered those who sympathized with him and escaped to the desert to wage guerrilla warfare to overthrow the foreign dominion. This naturally raises a question whether it is okay to commit murder for a just cause, i.e., whether end justifies the means? It was St Augustine who theorized and proposed the concept of “Just War”. Recently, Pope Francis was confronted by journalists with a similar question. They asked him whether it is okay to conduct a preemptive strike to incapacitate the Muslim terrorist group ISIS. Pope Francis replied, “War is not a solution and in war everybody loses”. Then he continued, “However, we have a right to defend ourselves and also a duty to stop the evil doers from committing crime”. Now, what exactly was the attitude of Jesus in this regard? When Peter tried to defend Jesus using his sword Jesus admonished him saying, “Put your sword back in its place, for all who draw the sword will die by the sword” (Mt 26:52). According to Jesus, our self-defense is of no avail unless and until God defends us. Therefore, are we supposed to wait for God passively? No, that is not what Jesus said or did. He did everything he could to stop the perpetuation of evil.

In today’s Gospel we find Jesus weeping over Jerusalem and predicting the forthcoming total destruction of that city. He wept over Jerusalem saying, “Jerusalem, Jerusalem, you who kill the prophets and stone those sent to you, how often I have longed to gather your children together, as a hen gathers her chicks under her wings, and you were not willing” (Mt 23:37). Inactivity, when duty calls is wrong. At the same time ego-driven activism; paying no attention to our fellow beings and God; is also equally wrong. “Be totally detached and totally involved” is the essence of Carmelite spirituality. Even while hiding in a cave from his enemies Prophet Elijah was burning with zeal for Yahweh. The great English poet John Milton after going blind wrote a famous poem titled On His Blindness. That sonnet’s last line is as follows: “They also serve who only stand and wait”. That poem is an eye-opener – the outcome of a mystic vision he had. In fact, both his classics, Paradise Lost and Paradise Regained were written after he became totally blind. It is our total availability that makes us the effective instrument in the hands of God. The warning of Jesus to the inhabitants of Jerusalem is relevant even to this day, “they will not leave one stone upon another within you because you did not recognize the time of your visitation.” Dr Kurian Perumpallikunnel CMI

navchetana.com/web/homilies.php?date=2015-11-19

**************************************************************

November 17, 2016

The woman we are remembering today so loved the poor that she could be compared to any other saint—even St. Vincent de Paul, who was made patron of all charitable societies by Pope Leo XIII—because, in fact, she was declared the Patroness of Catholic charities.

Born in Hungary in 1207, Elizabeth at 14 was married to Louis of Thuringia (a German principality), whom she dearly loved. She bore three children. After 6 years of marriage her husband died in the Crusades, and Elizabeth was grief-stricken.

Despite her royal rank, Elizabeth wore simple clothes and daily took bread to hundreds of beggars who came to her gate. Under the spiritual direction of a Franciscan Friar, she led a life of prayer and mortification. In 1228, after the death of her husband, Elizabeth joined the Third Order of St. Francis, spending the three remaining years of her short life caring for the poor in a hospital which she had founded in honor of St. Francis of Assisi (who had died two years earlier). Eventually her health deteriorated, and she died at 23 years old in 1234. She was canonized barely 4 years later.

schoolofthewordonline.com/scriptural-library/daily-gospel/english/item/3707-november-17-2016

***************************************************************

See Today’s Readings:  Year I,   Year II

Back to: Thursday of the 33rd Week of the Year

This entry was posted in zz. Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s